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Comment: Re:Heartbleed (Score 1) 205

by dissy (#48918877) Attached to: Serious Network Function Vulnerability Found In Glibc

How many years was Heartbleed around before anyone noticed? Apparently "many eyes" were not reading that bit of code.

Even you admit heartbleed *WAS* around (not *IS* around) and thus was found and fixed.
Clearly at least two eyes reviewed the code, found the bug, and it is now fixed as a result.

That is two more eyes than is searching through closed source code.
Two is still greater than zero so it is still a net positive.

Comment: MDisc (Score 1) 245

by bill_mcgonigle (#48918659) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Medium For Personal Archive?

Asking myself the same question, I went with MDisc technology, in the BluRay capacity, in addition to my hard drive backups. MDisc uses an inorganic pigment as opposed to the organic dyes that are common on CD/DVD/BluRay recordables (and degrade over time).

I'll do an MDisc burn every year and move it offsite, to keep with the 4TB ZFS drive I rotate offsite weekly. The MDisc won't get my mp3 or mp4 files, but the stuff I can't recreate.

My best idea currently is to write PAR files of loop-back mounted LUKS volumes and include the PAR software source and ISO of the distro on the disc, in case I need the data in 20 years (emulators should be readily available for 2015 hardware).

I needed a BluRay writer anyway, so I went with this LG and it's been a great drive so far, and at the right price point for me.

Comment: Re:Success! (Score 0) 94

by bill_mcgonigle (#48915879) Attached to: FCC Fines Verizon For Failing To Investigate Rural Phone Problems

Until the fines are set to a level to remove all profit and THEN put a punishment on top, large business will continue to flout the law because it's more profitable.

You're absolutely right on the theory, but then take the next step to recognize that it's the purpose of government to ensure their profits and help them take money from us (in addition to the FCC taking money from us directly and giving it to the telco corporations).

This is evidenced by these fines never having been at a level such as you describe and, more recently, the move to no-plead agreements between prosecutors and corporations. You'll be shouting from your wheelchair in a retirement home that the government should increase fines on corporations to be proportional to their income, unless the fundamental bases of the system are changed.

Of course, if you do something wrong on the scale of millions of dollars of damage, you go to prison. If a corporation does something similarly wrong, they pay out some pocket change. Because "corporations are people, my friend."

Comment: Re:You know... (Score 3, Informative) 32

by bill_mcgonigle (#48911117) Attached to: Getting Charged Up Over Chargers at CES (Video)

Every dollar store sells USB wall chargers

Speaking of that - maybe everybody knows this already but it had escaped my attention - I was getting annoyed that my phone charges very fast with the Samsung charger/cable but rather slowly with the well-rated 2A charger I bought off Amazon.

The issue was my dollar-store cables. Long story short, there is 28/28 gauge wire inside cheap cables and the resistance means they can only pull 500mA. The electronics at both ends are smart enough to figure this out. What you need is a
28/24 cable and then you can get a fast charge.

I'm using Galaxy Charging Current Lite to measure my existing USB cables and tossing the ones that can't handle at least 1.3A. This helps with my over-stuffed box of USB cables too.

Comment: Re:Consumers? No just whiny fanboys (Score 1) 113

by dissy (#48908997) Attached to: NVIDIA GTX 970 Specifications Corrected, Memory Pools Explained

As an owner of a GTX 970 card, all I can say is I can run Shadow of Mordor at full 1920x1080 res with the "ultra" texture setting and it never dips below 30fps, usually getting 45-60.

The additional fact I got the card as an open-box return at the local computer store for $220 makes things a no-brainer for me even if the allegations of 3.5gb vram were true.

There is no game in existence that a 980 or titan card can play that my 970 couldn't, even if I had to bump the settings down to just "very high".

If I bought a thousand of the things for super computer style multi-GPU number crunching, then I would probably be more upset and yelling a bit louder at Nvidia.
As a gamer I just can't see myself getting any worked up over this.

Comment: Re:Salary versus cost of living in each city (Score 0) 136

by bill_mcgonigle (#48892555) Attached to: By the Numbers: The Highest-Paying States For Tech Professionals

The gag is that the seriously wealthy aren't worried about Obama's new tax policies, because they can afford a tax lawyer who can prove that they earn nothing.

If you haven't been paying attention for the past few millennia, the purpose of government is to transfer resources from the masses to the few. I know, they don't tell that to the masses in their indoctrination centers, but if you look at all available evidence, it's pretty clear.

Sure, they throw a few bones to the dogs to make sure they don't turn on their owners, but look at every available trend and analyze the data.

Comment: Re:I have an even better idea (Score 0, Troll) 304

by bill_mcgonigle (#48892529) Attached to: Government Recommends Cars With Smarter Brakes

Let's just enforce existing laws and get dangerous drivers off the road.

Correct.

THERE IS NO RIGHT TO DRIVE.

Stop acting brainwashed. The Right to Travel is a fundamental human right. Go check out the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that your government probably signed on to if you don't believe me. It does not mean that humans have a right to crawl through the muddy forests to get from place to place - it means all humans have the fundamental right to travel in the common manner of a society. Whether that's a donkey cart or an SUV with DVD Entertainment System or an Airbus A340.

There are even places where automobile travel is the only allowed method of travel - we have an area around here where the local road was taken over for an Interstate and the only way in or out is an exit.

If you are a dangerous driver you can and should be taken off the road.

Correct. There's a mechanism for that.

No person shall ... be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law

The Right to Travel is a fundamental liberty and we have a way to deal with taking away liberties for the protection of society. It doesn't require parroting some bullshit statist rhetoric your phys ed. teacher told you in high school.

Now your insurance company - they ought to have a lot to say about your competency as a driver. Sadly, they almost never do, except in aggregate, such as very high insurance rates in MA where the passing grade on a DMV test is 60%. You ought to be able to save $400 a year if you score 95% or better, but no ... that wouldn't be _fair_. Regulators gotta regulate, whether it does harm or not, so everybody pays high rates and the incentives to improve are eliminated.

Comment: Re:Why would anyone buy something from those catal (Score 3, Insightful) 65

by bill_mcgonigle (#48892427) Attached to: Smartphones, Tablets and EBay Send SkyMall To Chapter 11

Long before those things ever existed people weren't buying SkyMall's useless, overpriced crap.

Obviously false, since people don't stay in a business for decades just to piss away money.

However, the economy is the worst it's been in 60 years (vis-a-vis age-discounted labor participation rates) and so there's just less of a pool of money to waste.

Skymall took some cream off the top but we're down to whole milk now.

Smartphones might have helped it along, but there are people posting here about reading the catalog for entertainment because they couldn't figure out how to bring a book with them on the airplane. Those people aren't planning ahead on their phones either.

Comment: Re:What's the difference between China and EU? (Score 1) 211

by bill_mcgonigle (#48892401) Attached to: China Cuts Off Some VPNs

And if anyone thinks they should be, let them and their loved ones be the first victims, for "their cause".

That's certainly a risk. Not a huge one, but a real one. One in a million is not zero.

This is why freedom requires courage and bravery, and an acceptance of personal responsibility. To be sure, such concepts are anathema to many individuals.

Then perhaps the rest of us in the world can then live better lives.

You mean to say 'safer' lives. A life without freedom is never better for people who value it.

It may be that we'll all be happiest if people who do not value freedom separate themselves from those who do. If only there were a Natural Rights Republic somewhere that the freedom-loving people could flock to ... maybe China will take those who want a centrally-planned society.

Comment: Re:Once more (Score 1) 100

by dissy (#48889009) Attached to: U.S. Gas Stations Vulnerable To Internet Attacks

>We have to ask why everything NEEDS to be internet connected. A local connection to the sensors will allow the station to determine when they need to refill said tanks. Not much point in putting it out there on the big scary internet. :D

It isn't a "need", it is only a "want"

Just imagine the cost difference between a fleet of IT people posistioned in every city the gas station chain does business in, paying their US pay rates - compared to a poor lone indian guy on the other side of the planet being paid a tiny fraction of US pay rates, not multiplied by the number of employees (or multiplied by one technically) able to manage all 100000 pumps owned by the chain.

The psychopaths at the top of the gas station chain companies get to keep that unspent money for themselves, so the less they pay out the better it is in their mind.

Of course you both get what you pay for, and must suffer the consequences of your own choices and actions once made, but it's pretty rare either of those factors even pops into their minds - and when it does the only reaction is to beef up the golden parachute package for when the inevitable happens.

The point is the whole intention here is not to do things right but to save money and raise profits without concern for the future or security of the company as a whole.

Going by those terms, not only do the pumps need to be on the Internet, but does make them more short term profits, so clearly is the correct solution to their incorrect and needless problem.

Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the streets after them. -- Bill Vaughn

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