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Comment: Re:Don't google it. Bing it! (Score 1) 101

by Attila Dimedici (#47913259) Attached to: Court Rules the "Google" Trademark Isn't Generic
I am not sure why "google" works as a verb, but MS made a bad choice in "Bing". I'm sorry, but saying you "binged" it sounds slightly obscene...Of course, it also does not work because the following sentence would feel right, "Ray Rice is in trouble because he did a bit more than just bing his girlfriend (now wife)."

Comment: Re:BTW, this proves piracy is irrelevant for artis (Score 1) 559

Or maybe people just are not that interested in the music that is available? I do not pirate music, but I, also, do not buy music. I have several friends who pirate music...interestingly enough, they buy more music every year than I ever did.

Comment: Re:Cart FIRMLY in front of horse! CHECK! (Score 1) 437

You made the point I came here to make. Why don't we wait until Tesla actually does it before we ask why other companies don't? It is all very well and good to praise Tesla for making the effort, but before we condemn others for not making the same effort we should wait to see if Tesla succeeds. Once Tesla has this plant up and running we can analyze their results against what they had to do to obtain those results and then judge whether or not this is something other companies should implement. For example, if Tesla's solution depends on the factory being located in Reno, NV with annual rainfall of about 8 inches, do we really want all of our manufacturing (and the people employed doing it) located in areas with such low annual rainfall? I was hoping to get an average for the entire U.S., but the average rainfall east of the Mississippi is slightly about 30 inches, close to 4 times that of Reno.

Comment: Re:Wrong Title (Score 1) 496

Perhaps you can tell me the names of the "two groups advocating for women and Puerto Rican independence," because despite reading the article before I posted the comment you replied to and then reading it again when you linked to it in your reply, I can find no mention of the names of those groups.

Comment: Re:Wrong Title (Score 4, Informative) 496

Researcher Fired At NSF After Government Finds She Lied On Her Routine Background Check

Actually, it is more a matter of "Researcher Fired at NSF After Government Alleges She Lied On Her Routine Background Check." After reading the article, it appears to me that this is a story that bears paying attention to, but is probably not a scandal. The researcher in question did indeed have ties with a questionable organization. Since the article fails to name the two subsidiary organizations of which she was a member it is not possible to dismiss her claim that she was unfamiliar with their ties to the parent organization. On the other hand, the fact that she was a member of two separate groups which were fronts for a third group significantly increases the likelihood she was aware that they were affiliated with the parent group. Especially when you combine that with her knowing members of the group who carried out an attempted robbery of a Brinks' truck, one of them well enough to carry on correspondence with him while he was in jail.
It is still possible that she was unaware of the ties, but by the time she was interviewed for the background checks, she should have been. After all, at that point she spent a significant amount of time corresponding with a member of the group who went to jail for a highly publicized crime related to the organizations of which she had been a member. On the other hand, the article certainly makes it seem like the information against her is somewhat sketchy.

Comment: Re:so (Score 1) 150

by Attila Dimedici (#47835893) Attached to: Hackers Break Into HealthCare.gov
As someone else pointed out, your answer sounds oh so logical, but suffers from the problem of being false. The VA received a much lager increase in resources than it did patients.
So, explain to me again why I should believe this Administration official when they claim that no private personal information was stolen during this breach? Bear in mind that this official answers to the same people as the IRS officials who claimed that Lois Lerner's emails had been lost due to a hard drive crash, only to admit that backups existed when a judge insisted they testify under oath about exactly what had happened (the judge making it clear that he would hold the specific people who testified accountable for the accuracy of their statements).

Comment: Re:Definition of "Lie"? (Score 2) 150

by Attila Dimedici (#47833331) Attached to: Hackers Break Into HealthCare.gov
No, he was either lying, or he intentionally did not listen to his advisers who were trying to tell him that people would not be able to keep their insurance or their doctors. Well, it is also possible that he assumed that people had voluntarily chosen doctors and insurance they did not like, so would be perfectly happy to give it up for insurance which covered less and cost more and doctors who delivered poorer service (largely because new regulations would require the doctors to spend more time filling out forms for bureaucrats than actually treating their patients).

If you hype something and it succeeds, you're a genius -- it wasn't a hype. If you hype it and it fails, then it was just a hype. -- Neil Bogart

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