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Comment: Re:slashvertized service is commercial (Score 1) 51

by Aryeh Goretsky (#47373815) Attached to: IEEE Launches Anti-malware Services To Improve Security

Hello,

Software vendors are not charged for submitting to the CMX, and the Taggant System is free for packer authors, as well.

It is the developers of anti-malware software who are paying for access to the CMX and Taggant System metadata, since they get the most value out of using that information. They are essentially underwriting the costs for everyone else in order to help provide a mechanism that helps clean up the ecosystem.

While there are probably some anti-malware software developers for whom this would be a big investment, there are probably a lot for whom it is not, and since this is being done under the auspices of the IEEE, I wouldn't be surprised if there wasn't some provision for academia, too.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Comment: Re:Taggant (Score 1) 51

by Aryeh Goretsky (#47373455) Attached to: IEEE Launches Anti-malware Services To Improve Security

Hello,

I believe the idea is to allow legitimate developers of packers, cryptors, etc. a means of identifying their software. I would not expect those folks on the malware side of things to take any action as a result of this activity under the IEEE's auspices as it does not apply to them.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Comment: Re:Taggant (Score 1) 51

by Aryeh Goretsky (#47373441) Attached to: IEEE Launches Anti-malware Services To Improve Security
Hello,

It probably won't help much, if at all, but the number of legitimate applications which are self-modifying is comparatively very rare compared to those which done.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

In reply to "Anonymous Coward" at Wednesday July 02, 2014 @12:34AM:

how will this help against self rewriting applications

+ - IEEE launches anti-malware services to improve security

Submitted by Aryeh Goretsky
Aryeh Goretsky (129230) writes "The IEEE Standards Assocation has launched an Anti-Malware Support Service (AMSS) to help the computer security industry respond more quickly to malware.

The first two services available are a Clean file Metadata Exchange [PDF], to help prevent false positives in anti-malware software, and a Taggant System [PDF] to help prevent software packers from being abused.

Official announcement is here."

Comment: detection (Score 3, Informative) 41

by Aryeh Goretsky (#47337845) Attached to: Saudi Government Targeting Dissidents With Mobile Malware

Hello,

The SHA-256 hash for the file is 8e64c38789c1bae752e7b4d0d58078399feb7cd3339712590cf727dfd90d254d.

According to VirusTotal, at the time the report was released, it was being detected by by the following anti-malware programs:

  • Avira AntiVir - Android/FakeInst.ES.4
  • Baidu-International - Trojan.Android.FakeInst.bES
  • ESET - a variant of Android/Morcut.A
  • Kaspersky - HEUR:Trojan-Spy.AndroidOS.Mekir.a
  • ThreatTrack VIPRE - Trojan.AndroidOS.Generic.A

Five out of fifty-three program, or a little under 10%. Currently, detection is at 13/53, according to this report.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

The Military

The Revolutionary American Weapons of War That Never Happened 133

Posted by samzenpus
from the pipe-dreams dept.
An anonymous reader writes There have been many US military machines of war that seemed to be revolutionary, but never make it out of the prototype stage. As Robert Farley explains: "Sometimes they die because they were a bad idea in the first place. For the same reasons, bad defense systems can often survive the most inept management if they fill a particular niche well enough." A weapon can seem like an amazing invention, but it still has to adapt to all sorts of conditions--budgetary, politics, and people's plain bias. Here's a look at a few of the best weapons of war that couldn't win under these "battlefield" conditions.

Comment: Why does MojoKid only submit links to HotHardware? (Score 5, Interesting) 113

Hello,

Why does MojoKid only submit articles which link to HotHardware reviews? Is HotHardware a Dice.Com site? Is MojoKid a Dice.Com employee?

A disclaimer would be nice about paid editorial content or when linking to sister sites in the Dice Holdings portfolio, etc.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Earth

Scientists Race To Develop Livestock That Can Survive Climate Change 291

Posted by timothy
from the just-need-to-outrun-you dept.
Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Evan Halper writes in the LA Times that with efforts to reduce carbon emissions lagging, researchers, backed by millions of dollars from the federal government, are looking for ways to protect key industries from the impact of climate change by racing to develop new breeds of farm animals that can stand up to the hazards of global warming. ""We are dealing with the challenge of difficult weather conditions at the same time we have to massively increase food production" to accommodate larger populations and a growing demand for meat, says Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. For example a team of researchers is trying to map the genetic code of bizarre-looking African naked-neck chickens to see if their ability to withstand heat can be bred into flocks of US broilers. "The game is changing since the climate is changing," says Carl Schmidt. "We have to start now to anticipate what changes we have to make in order to feed 9 billion people," citing global-population estimates for 2050." (More below.)

Comment: Backups for home and SOHO (Score 1) 76

by Aryeh Goretsky (#46283237) Attached to: A Primer on Data Backup for Small- to Medium-Sized Companies (Video)

Hello,

My day job is at a security software company (anti-malware). We don't do anything in the backup space (either develop software, resell someone else's software, etc.) but I did write a paper on the subject of backups for them, because not every computer problem is a virus. It is more geared towards home users or home-based businesses than the video, above, because I figured that businesses already have some idea about backups—whether or not they are doing them properly is entirely another question, though.

The paper is basically an overview of backup technologies that might be applicable to a single PC or a small LAN, and is completely vendor neutral (like I said, no ties to anyone/anything in the backup space). It is also specific to on-premise backup technologies, as opposed to cloud, because those are the types of backup technologies with which I am experienced.

Anyways, if you are interested, or want to share it with a friend, family member, et cetera, here's the the paper: Options for backing up your computer [PDF, 862KB]

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

One of the most overlooked advantages to computers is... If they do foul up, there's no law against whacking them around a little. -- Joe Martin

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