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Comment: Re:Sanity? (Score 1) 432

by Aryden (#48269765) Attached to: Ken Ham's Ark Torpedoed With Charges of Religious Discrimination
Yes, the people who wrote it, although not writing their persona views into it, published numerous papers, articles, and even books describing their opinions that government and religion should have nothing to do with one another. And more to your point, "in order to form a well regulated militia" also doesn't mean what the NRA would like it to mean.

Comment: Re:grrr (Score 1) 57

by Aryden (#48259929) Attached to: Taking the Census, With Cellphones
Let's say out of 435 Reps, you have 215 Dems, and 220 Republican. Then there is this shift you speak of. The party in power would then make sure to gerrymander the "new" districts so that it STAYS that way rather than a massive intermixing of voters. So, nothing would really change other than where the rep came from.

Comment: Re:grrr (Score 1) 57

by Aryden (#48256401) Attached to: Taking the Census, With Cellphones
Sorry, keep them where they are in terms of politically assigned districting. i.e transfer 19 reps to Wyoming, then gerrymander them back to being in the same "transplanted" districts. In other words, moving them from CA to WY would have no real effect as the party in power would redraw the lines to suit their desires.

Comment: Re:Sanity? (Score 1) 432

by Aryden (#48256251) Attached to: Ken Ham's Ark Torpedoed With Charges of Religious Discrimination

This is why we have a Supreme Court that rules whether or not a state law violates the constitution of the United States. This has been proven since its inception and continues to be proved regularly. see: same sex marriage. Any state that decided to pass a law stating that X religion is the religion of the state and has rights and privileges within the state that no other religion enjoys, would be struck down by SCOTUS as unconstitutional and you know it.

"The "Establishment Clause," stating that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion," is generally read to prohibit the Federal government from establishing a national church ("religion") or excessively involving itself in religion, particularly to the benefit of one religion over another. Following the ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution and through the doctrine of incorporation, this restriction is held to be applicable to state governments as well."

see also the 14th Amendment

Comment: Re:grrr (Score 1) 57

by Aryden (#48252915) Attached to: Taking the Census, With Cellphones
Not with the way in which Congress has rigged the law in regards to the count of reps from each state. The only real way it would change is if half of CA left for Wyoming. Even then, the math they use would STILL keep them where they are and they would gerrymander the districts to reflect the new population lines.

Comment: Waste (Score 1) 182

by Aryden (#47965727) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Who Should Pay Costs To Attend Conferences?
In general, just about every conference I've been to has been a waste of money. The only real benefits I have gleaned from them have been free software for development use and/or making contacts. In general, the information that I would receive from the confs. is more readily accessible online or through books. An example would be a yearly conference that I used to attend for a particular software that I develop. On average, the conference + hotel + travel would run me about $6000. It was a massive waste as, all we really spent time doing was drinking and chumming around. In 3 years, I might have had 1 or 2 actual lectures or Q&A sessions that had any real benefit.

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