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Comment Re:Then you're gonna love this... (Score 1) 1244,_the_Damned
I love Amber, but as far as "forgotten" Fantasy goes, I'd recommend Dilvish and the sequel, The Changing Land.
The Changeling and Madwand duo of novels is also good, but I haven't read them in a decade. As soon as I finish Stephenson's REAMDE and Richard K. Morgan's latest, I think it is time to visit the local used book store!

Comment Re:Bought or just acquired? (Score 1) 298

My Father once told me, "Son, if you do not have enough time to read, then you do not have enough time."

As a bit of an insomniac myself, I find I have plenty of time to read each night. My fiancee and I frequent the local used book stores and I find you can get a whole fistful of classic Sci-Fi paperbacks quite cheaply as many are sold at their 70's-era cover price. (And they inflation only helps the banks! ;)

Google Street View Shoots the Same Woman 43 Times 106

Geoffrey.landis writes "Terry Southgate discovered that his wife Wendy appears on the Google Street View of his neighborhood not once or twice but a whopping 43 times. From the article: 'It seems as if the Street View car simply followed the same route as Wendy and Trixie. However, Wendy was a little suspicious that the car was doing something on the "tricksie" side. Several of the Street View shots show Wendy looking with some concern towards the car that was, well, to put it politely, crawling along the curb. "I didn't know what it was doing. It was just driving round very, very slowly," Wendy told the Sun.' The next best thing to being a movie star — a Street View star!"

Comment Re:Dragged along for the ride (Score 1) 347

The cynic in me can't help but agree with you, but this is the first "evidence" I've seen that such a thing can even work consistently. Given, these are all "staged" successes, but I have to admit that I am now a little more convinced that someday the USA could shoot down a few of those Chinese / Russian / Pakistani(?) nukes in an incoming ICBM attack.

Also, WarGames was being shown on the big screen for it's 25th anniversary here recently, which reminded me that "close" only counts in horseshoes, hand grenades and global thermonuclear war.

Submission + - Sapphire Delivers new sub-$150 ATI GPU

Kyle Bennett writes: "HardOCP runs the a new Sapphire Radeon X1950 GT (new GPU from ATI that is only sold by Sapphire currently) through it paces and shows where the X1950 GT delivers some great high resolution gaming at up to 1600x1200 resolution. This video card may change your mind about the sub-$200 "budget" category. And it is not from NVIDIA, which given the Vista driver situation, is a plus. [H] says, "The Sapphire Radeon X1950 GT can be had for $154.99 USD from Newegg, with a $10 mail-in rebate. This compares directly to what you can find a GeForce 7900 GS for. For this price the Sapphire Radeon X1950 GT is a tremendous value.""

Viacom Turns to Joost, Spurns YouTube 139

Vincenzo writes "Viacom has signed a deal with Joost that will see content from MTVI, Comedy Central, and CBS distributed on the new P2P distribution service. The move comes just two weeks after demanding YouTube pull over 100,000 videos offline. 'Joost's promise to protect their copyrights was a major factor in Viacom's decision, and also a stumbling block in their discussions with YouTube/Google. At the moment is it quite easy to download and store video content from YouTube, but no such exploit for Joost is known to exist.' It's also a 'secure' distribution medium in the eyes of many in the entertainment industry, since users can't upload content themselves.'"

12 Crackpot Ideas That Could Transform Tech 213

InfoWorldMike passed us a link to an entertaining article with a sort of 'top 12' innovative technologies that could change the world. Some of the techs include solid-state drives, holographic and phase-change storage, artificial intelligence, e-books, desktop web apps, and quantum computing/cryptography. For each of these technologies, expert observers weigh in on the potentials and pitfalls of these disciplines. Here are Esther Lim's comments on e-books: "Another issue, besides the prohibitive cost and cumbersome nature of e-documents, concerns the vast portion of the contracts that were signed and agreed upon before e-books came onto the scene ... That raises questions not just in terms of what rights the user has, but what rights the publisher has vis-à-vis the copyright holder." We've discussed almost all of these technologies on the site at one point or another. Which is the most important? Which one do you think we'll never 'get right'?

UK's Blair Dismisses Online Anti ID-Card Petition 377

An anonymous reader writes "Prime Minister Tony Blair has responded personally via email to 28,000 online petitioners opposing the UK's planned identity card scheme, and has closed the online petition. The email reads: 'We live in a world in which people, money and information are more mobile than ever before. Terrorists and international criminal gangs increasingly exploit this to move undetected across borders and to disappear within countries. Terrorists routinely use multiple identities — up to 50 at a time... ID cards which contain biometric recognition details and which are linked to a National Identity Register will make this much more difficult.'"

"Today's robots are very primitive, capable of understanding only a few simple instructions such as 'go left', 'go right', and 'build car'." --John Sladek