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Submission + - Microsoft Removes The Option To Opt Out of Windows 10 Free Upgrade (

schwit1 writes: Microsoft is now forcing users running Windows 7 and 8/8.1 to avail the free upgrade to Windows 10, according to many reports from users still on the old operating systems.

Previously, the old versions of Windows would prompt users to upgrade for free; however, it was up to them if they accept the upgrade or not. But now the recent popups just inform the users that their upgrade is ready and will be installed after a specific time period.

Electronic Frontier Foundation

DOJ Often Used Cell Tower Impersonating Devices Without Explicit Warrants 146

Via the EFF comes news that, during a case involving the use of a Stingray device, the DOJ revealed that it was standard practice to use the devices without explicitly requesting permission in warrants. "When Rigmaiden filed a motion to suppress the Stingray evidence as a warrantless search in violation of the Fourth Amendment, the government responded that this order was a search warrant that authorized the government to use the Stingray. Together with the ACLU of Northern California and the ACLU, we filed an amicus brief in support of Rigmaiden, noting that this 'order' wasn't a search warrant because it was directed towards Verizon, made no mention of an IMSI catcher or Stingray and didn't authorize the government — rather than Verizon — to do anything. Plus to the extent it captured loads of information from other people not suspected of criminal activity it was a 'general warrant,' the precise evil the Fourth Amendment was designed to prevent. ... The emails make clear that U.S. Attorneys in the Northern California were using Stingrays but not informing magistrates of what exactly they were doing. And once the judges got wind of what was actually going on, they were none too pleased:"

Misconfigured Open DNS Resolvers Key To Massive DDoS Attacks 179

msm1267 writes with an excerpt From Threat Post: "While the big traffic numbers and the spat between Spamhaus and illicit webhost Cyberbunker are grabbing big headlines, the underlying and percolating issue at play here has to do with the open DNS resolvers being used to DDoS the spam-fighters from Switzerland. Open resolvers do not authenticate a packet-sender's IP address before a DNS reply is sent back. Therefore, an attacker that is able to spoof a victim's IP address can have a DNS request bombard the victim with a 100-to-1 ratio of traffic coming back to them versus what was requested. DNS amplification attacks such as these have been used lately by hacktivists, extortionists and blacklisted webhosts to great success." Running an open DNS resolver isn't itself always a problem, but it looks like people are enabling neither source address verification nor rate limiting.
The Media

What Does It Actually Cost To Publish a Scientific Paper? 166

ananyo writes "Nature has published an investigation into the real costs of publishing research after delving into the secretive, murky world of science publishing. Few publishers (open access or otherwise-including Nature Publishing Group) would reveal their profit margins, but they've pieced together a picture of how much it really costs to publish a paper by talking to analysts and insiders. Quoting from the piece: '"The costs of research publishing can be much lower than people think," agrees Peter Binfield, co-founder of one of the newest open-access journals, PeerJ, and formerly a publisher at PLoS. But publishers of subscription journals insist that such views are misguided — born of a failure to appreciate the value they add to the papers they publish, and to the research community as a whole. They say that their commercial operations are in fact quite efficient, so that if a switch to open-access publishing led scientists to drive down fees by choosing cheaper journals, it would undermine important values such as editorial quality.' There's also a comment piece by three open access advocates setting out what they think needs to happen next to push forward the movement as well as a piece arguing that 'Objections to the Creative Commons attribution license are straw men raised by parties who want open access to be as closed as possible.'"

Submission + - Is there something wrong with the Adapteva Supercomputers? ( 1

Art Popp writes: I need for a super computer to do some very branch-diverse AI experimentation for gaming AI development. I can't afford EC2 for an extended period. Caught up in the magic of GPU computing, I now have 5 CUDA books fully digested and an Nvidia 580GTX completely idle (except for Portal nights), and it turns out it's going to be nightmarishly tricky to bend a GPU to my needs because of the inherent dislike SIMD architectures have for this kind of code. I just came across the Parallella Kickstarter and backed it. The 64 individual cores, the non-SIMD layout, the decent memory throughput and the simple C programming interface make it sound pretty awesome, but CUDA was the wrong flavor of awesome for my needs. Is there a reason there aren't more backers for a $200 supercomputer? Or should I buy three?

Submission + - Why Can't Industry Design an Affordable Hearing Aid? 1

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Tricia Romano writes in the NY Times that over the last 10 years, purchasing a hearing aid had become even more difficult and confusing than buying a new car — and almost as expensive. "I visited Hearx, the national chain where I had bought my previous aids. There, a fastidious young man spread out a brochure for my preferred brand, Siemens, and showed me three models. The cheapest, a Siemens Motion 300, started at $1,600. The top-of-the-line model was more than $2,000 — for one ear. I gasped." A hearing aid is basically just a microphone and amplifier in your ear so it isn’t clear why it costs thousands of dollars while other electronic equipment like cellphones, computers and televisions have gotten cheaper. Russ Apfel, an engineer who designed a technology now found in all hearing aids, says there is no good reason for the high prices. “The hearing aid industry uses every new thing, like digital or a new algorithm, to raise prices,” says Apfel. “The semiconductor industry traditionally reduces the cost of products by 10 to 15 percent a year,” he said, but “hearing aids go up 8 percent a year annually” and have for the last 20 years."

Submission + - Microsoft Windows 8 devices not exactly flying off the shelves ( 1

girlmad writes: Doesn't sound like Microsoft’s Windows 8 has got off to a great start in the UK, with computer retailer Currys and PC World struggling to shift devices running the new software. The store on Oxford Street in London was yet to sell one device running Windows 8 by midday today. It seems that the hype created in the build-up to Microsoft's launch has already blown over.
Red Hat Software

Submission + - ARM, AMCC Team on Server (

Nerval's Lobster writes: "Red Hat announced Oct. 25 that it had teamed up with both ARM and ARM licensee Applied Micro Circuits Corp. to develop a 64-bit server design based on the ARM architecture, a day after another ARM server partnership was struck.

ARM and AMCC said that they planned to develop a server that would be based on the AppliedMicro X-Gene “server on a chip” design. It wasn’t immediately clear if the two companies would be developing the server design themselves, or if they would need to partner with a third company.

For its part, Red Hat said that it was interested in the work, and planned to have a “Fedora 19 [Linux] remix” out in time for the 64-bit designs, expected later in 2014."


Submission + - Sunseeker Team Building a Two-Passenger Solar-Powered Airplane (

Zothecula writes: Piloted solar flight has been a reality for some time, with even international flights (as made by the Solar Impulse) now possible. Up to this point, such voyages have been a strictly solo affair, however the team originally responsible for the Sunseeker II intends to change this by manufacturing what’s billed as the world’s first two-seater solar aircraft – a motor glider named the Sunseeker Duo.

Submission + - ARM Launches 2nd Generation Mali-T600 GPUs Promising 50% Performance Boost (

DavidGilbert99 writes: "ARM has launched its second generation of mobile GPU designs hoping the new Mali-T600 series architecture will help boost penetration in the smartphone and tablet market.

Cambridge-based ARM Holdings says that the new generation of GPU designs will provide a "dramatically improved user experience for tablets, smartphones and smart-TVs" with each of the three new designs promising a 50 percent performance boost over the current generation of GPUs."


Rhode Island Affiliates Banned From Sales 532

Rand Huck writes " has now added Rhode Island to its blacklist of affiliates in response to its proposed budget changes to enforce a tax on Internet sales, which includes commissions on their affiliate program by content providers based in Rhode Island. The first state to be blacklisted was North Carolina, for the same reason. If you go to a Rhode Island-based or North Carolina-based website that advertises goods as an affiliate, that website will no longer have the goods available because otherwise would be forced to pay sales tax to the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations or the State of North Carolina. The state's rationale is, if someone clicks to buy a good from via a site based in Rhode Island, it's equivalent to buying a good from a brick and mortar chain store located in Rhode Island."

Freshman Representative Opposes "TSA Porn" 620

An anonymous reader writes "Not content to simply follow the 'anything to protect American lives' mantra, freshman Representative Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) has introduced a bill to prohibit mandatory full body scans at airports. Chaffetz states, 'The images offer a disturbingly accurate view of a person's body underneath clothing ... Americans should not be required to expose their bodies in this manner in order to fly.' He goes on to note that the ACLU has expressed support for the bill. Maybe we don't need tin-foil sports coats to go with our tin-foil hats. For reference, the Daily Herald has a story featuring images from the millimeter wavelength imager, and we've talked about the scanners before."

A rock store eventually closed down; they were taking too much for granite.