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Comment: 5 days during the aftermath of Hurricane Ike (Score 3, Informative) 328

by Arrowmaster (#35218530) Attached to: In case of a blackout, batteries etc. will give me ...

When Hurricane Ike caused massive wind speeds and damage to the midwest, we were without power from Sunday to Thursday due to all the downed power lines all over the state. I ran a laptop, wireless router, and cable modem off of a 300watt inverter plugged into my car the entire time. I had to go outside and run the car for 30 minutes every 12 hours to keep the battery charged but I never once lost internet access. The neighbors couldn't believe I still had working high-speed internet access in that kinda situation.

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 1) 162

by Arrowmaster (#31594756) Attached to: How To Evade URL Filters With (Not-So) Fancy Math

No. Dotted-decimal notation is the only acceptable way to represent an IPv4 address in a URI according to RFC 3986. That RFC even specifically mentions that many implementations that process URIs make use of platform-dependent system routines, such as gethostbyname() and inet_aton(), to translate the string literal to an actual IP address and that may allow ways around filtering software.

If it is explicitly against the RFC then browsers shouldn't allow it.

http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#page-20
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#section-7.4

Comment: Re:And the lesson people don't learn is... (Score 1) 162

by Arrowmaster (#31594746) Attached to: How To Evade URL Filters With (Not-So) Fancy Math

We don't. Dotted-decimal notation is the only acceptable way to represent an IPv4 address in a URI according to RFC 3986. That RFC even specifically mentions that many implementations that process URIs make use of platform-dependent system routines, such as gethostbyname() and inet_aton(), to translate the string literal to an actual IP address and that may allow ways around filtering software.

If it is explicitly against the RFC then browsers shouldn't allow it.

http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#page-20
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#section-7.4

Comment: Re:Redundant Array of INEXPENSIVE Disks (Score 1) 227

by Arrowmaster (#28683369) Attached to: Building a 10 TB Array For Around $1,000
After I had yet another Western Digital harddrive die making an 8/11 or 72% failure rate over 5 years, I just ordered parts for a new computer including a hardware RAID from Newegg yesterday.

8x SAMSUNG F1 RAID Class HE103UJ
1x 3ware 9650SE-8LPML
1x 3ware BBU-MODULE-04 Battery Backup Unit

For $1,829.90 to make a 7 drive hardware RAID 6 array with 1 hotspare, but it seems I went with a lot higher quality parts than they did. And I included the price of the controller...

After my horrible experiences with consumer Western Digital drives (6x 250GB PATA and 2x 500GB SATA dead in the last 5 years), I wasn't about to touch these new consumer 2TB "Green" drives or the cursed Seagate 1.5TB drives so I went with the more expensive HE103UJ's. I hope they are worth it since this will be my first experience with a RAID. In the past I just used everything as separate drives since they weren't purchased all at once and I've paid greatly for that mistake.

It's not an ULTRA CHEAP RAID but I think it should be a fairly high quality one at least.

Fear is the greatest salesman. -- Robert Klein

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