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Comment Re:Seriously?? (Score 5, Insightful) 138

I do, why am I wrong?
Typical usage : I log onto distant machine, start working in command line (vim, python, matlab -nodesktop), then at some point I will need to display a couple of graphs or images. That's a relatively small graphical payload for which I *do not* want to use VNC. With ssh -X I get the windows to be displayed locally just as if I was doing the work on my light-weight terminal.

Submission + - Thirty Meter Telescope likely never gets built ... in Hawai

An anonymous reader writes: After years of doing everything the state of Hawaii demanded in order to get permission to build the Thirty Meter Telescope, a state judge today ordered that the whole process should start over again.

Since this order was instigated by the protesters, and that it appears the government favors those protesters, it appears that there is no chance TMT will ever get approval to build in Hawaii. Though the university consortium building the telescope says they want to go through the new process to get permission, they are wasting their time. It will never happen. The peasants with the pitchforks and burning torches, terrified of new knowledge while preferring the worship of a mountain, are in control in Hawaii.

Comment Nope... (Score 1) 105

you need four things: the largest aperture possible, the best-quality optical systems and cameras/CCDs, the least interference from the atmosphere, and the analytical techniques and power to make the most of every photon

Nope, you only need the best acquisition method possible to get out the most information per photon. This is not equivalent to having the best CCD camera or the best optical system. It actually can be the opposite now that we have a lot of processing capabilities (of both light beams and digital imaging).
We can, for instance, make high resolution images from low resolution sensors while being less sensitive to noise; or even introducing known aberrations in the system to correct for the shortcomings of traditional imaging techniques.

Submission + - Firefox 44 Deletes Fine-Grained Cookie Management (mozilla.org)

ewhac writes: Among its other desirable features, Firefox included a feature allowing very fine-grained cookie management. When enabled, every time a Web site asked to set a cookie, Firefox would raise a dialog containing information about the cookie requested, which you could then approve or deny. An "exception" list also allowed you to mark selected domains as "Always allow" or "Always deny", so that the dialog would not appear for frequently-visited sites. It was an excellent way to maintain close, custom control over which sites could set cookies, and which specific cookies they could set. It also helped easily identify poorly-coded sites that unnecessarily requested cookies for every single asset, or which would hit the browser with a "cookie storm" — hundreds of concurrent cookie requests.

Mozilla quietly deleted this feature from Firefox 44, with no functional equivalent put in its place. Further, users who had enabled the "Ask before accept" feature have had that preference silently changed to, "Accept normally." The proffered excuse for the removal was that the feature was unmaintained, and that its users were, "probably crashing multiple times a day as a result" (although no evidence was presented to support this assertion). Mozilla's apparent position is that users wishing fine-grained cookie control should be using a third-party add-on instead, and that an "Ask before accept" option was, "not really nice to use on today's Web."

Comment Demo... (Score 4, Informative) 51

They have released this demo : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kw0-JRa9n94 which looks pretty decent. You can find some artifacts (mainly the occlusion of the little robot which could be better). The depth of field looks pretty cool in the second part and the resolution seems decent (at least for the 1080p camera and for the few frame it is actually in focus, might not be perfect for the eye though).
I have no idea on the volume/weight of the device though.

Submission + - India and France form partnership to land on Mars (examiner.com)

MarkWhittington writes: The Economic Times noted that France has entered into an agreement with India to facilitate space cooperation with a plan to land a probe on Mars in the near future. India has already demonstrated that it is a space power to be reckoned with. The South Asian country recently orbited the Mangalyaan around the Red Planet, studying its atmosphere. Before the Mars mission, India orbited the Chandrayaan-1 around the moon. India plans to land the Chandrayaan-2 on the lunar surface sometime in 2017.

Submission + - Paris Treaty Could Broaden EPA's Authority Over Greenhouse Gases (insideclimatenews.org)

mdsolar writes: A decades-old and little-used provision of the Clean Air Act intended to make the United States a good environmental neighbor could now be employed to comprehensively control the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new analysis.

Authored by a team of professors, attorneys and environmental scholars specializing in climate change, the study analyzes a section of the Clean Air Act intended to safeguard international borders from air pollution. Their prescription could provide the most potent approach for achieving the targets of the Paris climate agreement, the analysts say.

"The time is ripe for EPA to consider use of its authority for international air pollution control," the study urged.

The provision has been part of the Clean Air Act since it was passed in the early 1970s. It authorizes the EPA to require states to address emissions that endanger public health or welfare in other countries––if those countries extend the same protections to the U.S.

Submission + - New Mersenne Prime Discovered, Largest Known Prime Number: 2^74,207,281 - 1

Dave Knott writes: The Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search (GIMPS) has discovered a new largest known prime number, 2^74,207,281-1, having 22,338,618 digits. The same GIMPS software just uncovered a flaw in Intel's latest Skylake CPUs, and its global network of CPUs peaking at 450 trillion calculations per second remains the longest continuously-running "grassroots supercomputing" project in Internet history. It is almost 5 million digits larger than the previous record prime number, in a special class of extremely rare prime numbers known as Mersenne primes. It is only the 49th known Mersenne prime ever discovered, each increasingly difficult to find.

Submission + - General Motors Launches a Bug Bounty Program - Minus the Bounty (securityledger.com)

chicksdaddy writes: General Motors (GM) has become the latest "old economy" firm to launch a program to entice white hat hackers and other expert to delve into the inner workings of its products in search of security flaws, The Security Ledger reports. (https://securityledger.com/2016/01/gm-launches-bug-bounty-program-minus-the-bounty/)

The company launched a bug bounty on January 5th on the web site of Hackerone (https://hackerone.com/gm), a firm that manages bounty programs on top of other firms, promising “eternal glory” to security experts who relay information on “security vulnerabilities of General Motors products and services.”

Despite a $47 billion market capitalization, however, GM is not offering monetary rewards – at least not yet. A page on Hackerone detailing how vulnerability reporters will be thanked reads “Be the first to receive eternal glory,” but does not spell out exactly what rewards are proffered. Judging from the description of the program, the "prize" for reporting a vulnerability to GM appears to be a promise by GM not to sue you for finding it.

The company earned immediate praise from security researchers Chris Valasek and Charlie Miller, whose research exposing security holes in vehicles manufactured by Fiat Chrysler attracted worldwide attention. “Great step in the right direction to Massimilla and the whole GM team,” wrote Chris Valasek of Uber (https://www.twitter.com/nudehaberdasher) in a Twitter post, an apparent reference to Jeff Massimilla, GM’s Chief of Cybersecurity. Valasek said offering security researchers a contact and a way to disclose vulnerabilities was important, even in the absence of a monetary reward.

Still, some researchers are skeptical that firms are willing to “walk the walk” when it comes to addressing and fixing reported vulnerabilities. “If we waited for Chrysler before disclosing the jeep hack, I bet it still wouldn’t be fixed,” wrote Valasek’s research partner Charlie Miller (https://www.twitter.com/0xCharlie) on Twitter.

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