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Comment: Re:Ticket ToS (Score 2) 226

by Arathon (#47677471) Attached to: Posting Soccer Goals On Vine Is Illegal, Say England's Premier League
this is pertinent, but doesn't affect copyright law, which in most countries exists regardless of and completely separate from most contractual agreements.

as I mentioned elsewhere, they might have standing to eject you from the stadium over a breach of this contract, but that doesn't mean copyright law is applicable.

Comment: probably BS (Score 1) 226

by Arathon (#47677453) Attached to: Posting Soccer Goals On Vine Is Illegal, Say England's Premier League
It would certainly be a violation of copyright law to repost a broadcast of the game. But taking your own video seems like creating a derivative work, if nothing else.

They would be within their rights to ban the usage of video recording devices inside the stadium, because it is ultimately private property and you've paid to see a performance. They would probably even be within their rights to sue you for breach of contract by making nonuse of recording devices a condition of your ticket price. But failing that, and failing a willingness to sue over it, I don't see how it could fall under copyright law.
Iphone

iPhone 5 Teardown Shows Boost To Repairability 171

Posted by Soulskill
from the if-it's-broke,-fix-it dept.
iFixit has posted a detailed teardown of the new iPhone 5. While the casing still uses Apple's proprietary pentalobe fasteners, the good news is that Apple has made the screen much easier to remove. Once the fasteners have been removed, the screen will lift out easily through the use of a suction cup. The screens are by far the most common parts of iPhones to break, and this change turns a complicated 38-step procedure that takes about 45 minutes at minimum into a quick, 5-10 minute job. The teardown also shows the iPhone 5 battery to be very similar to the iPhone 4S's, suggesting that the improvements to battery life come from other hardware and software changes. We get a look at the new A6 processor running the phone, which is a custom design based on ARMv7. iFixit also looks at the Lightning connector assembly; unfortunately, it includes the loudspeaker, bottom microphone, Wi-Fi antenna, and headphone jack as well, so fixing any one of those parts individually will be difficult. Whatever you think of Apple's decision to move to Lightning instead of micro-USB, it seems their switch away from the 30-pin connecter was necessitated by size constraints.
Handhelds

Amazon Debuts Kindle Paperwhite, Kindle Fire HD In 2 Sizes 307

Posted by timothy
from the plus-they-wash-your-back dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes "Amazon used a Sept. 6 event in California to debut a range of products, including a front-lit [not back-lit, as originally reported] Kindle e-reader with a higher-resolution screen, an updated Kindle Fire, and the new Kindle Fire HD in two screen sizes. First, Bezos showed off a new version of the Kindle e-reader, the Kindle Paperwhite, complete with a front-lit, higher-resolution screen (221 pixels-per-inch and 25 percent more contrast, according to Amazon). The device weighs 7.5 ounces and is 9.1mm thin; battery life is rated at eight weeks, and the screen brightness is adjustable. He then showed off the updated Kindle Fire, before moving to the Kindle Fire HD, which features a choice of 7-inch or 8.9-inch screens, dual stereo speakers with Dolby Digital Plus, two antennas for better Wi-Fi pickup, and a Texas Instruments OMAP 4470 processor (which Bezos claimed could out-perform the Tegra 3). The Kindle Fire HD's 7-inch version will retail for $199 and ship Sept. 14, while the 8.9-inch version will cost $299 and ship Nov. 20. An 8.9-inch, 4G LTE-enabled version with 32GB storage will be available starting Nov. 20 for $499, paired with a $49.99-a-year data plan."
Space

Launch Your Own Nanosatellite Into Space 119

Posted by samzenpus
from the my-first-satellite dept.
First time accepted submitter Rozine writes "Ever wanted to launch your own satellite into space? Thanks to a project at the Cornell Space Science Lab, now you can. In the words of the grad student leading the project, Zac Manchester, 'What better way of showing off your uber-geek credentials than having your own spacecraft?' Zac hopes that by shrinking the size of each spacecraft and using advancements in computer and solar cell technology, satellites can follow the path of the personal computer revolution, opening up space for the masses. For small donations you will receive mementos, but for $300 and up you will get your very own satellite to be launched into space. Perfect for slashdotters and school projects everywhere!" We covered this project in its infancy back in July. I'm glad to see it gained traction.

Comment: LINPACK/LAPACK/Netlib (Score 2) 314

by Arathon (#37527420) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Successful Software From Academia?
right up front: I know about this only because I work for these guys, but...

there's a whole host of Linear Algebra-related software written for high performance computing environments that is attributable largely to various teams of academics throughout the past 30 or so years. It is my understanding that these libraries get used by most anyone doing high-performance computing.

http://www.netlib.org/lapack/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPACK

Comment: SmugMug (Score 1) 680

by Arathon (#34948830) Attached to: How Do You Store Your Personal Photos?
$40/year, unlimited storage, unlimited uploads, will keep things private, and unlimited traffic for the photos you want to share. They use Amazon's S3 server system, which is the platinum standard in digital archival safety. Plus, they're cooler than Flickr. The only way this doesn't work is if your internet connection isn't pretty decent. Then, keeping up with the uploads could become a pain.
Data Storage

How Do You Store Your Personal Photos? 680

Posted by timothy
from the and-where-do-you-put-the-negatives? dept.
mxhf writes "I just came back from a four-week vacation to Mexico. This is the country for Aztecs and Maya Ruins and we visited plenty of them. Needless to say we took thousands of pictures with two cameras. Having arrived back home I realize that my hard-disk does not have enough space left to hold the additional 16GB that I collected on the other side of the globe. Now, my hard disk already is 250GB. I work exclusively on a laptop and do not want to change this. I know that there are larger disks today. But I figured that the time has come to finally move my image collection from my laptop to somewhere else. But where should I go? So, how do you store your photo collections? And how do you keep backups? These are obviously images that I want to keep for my life. So the need to survive fires, burglaries, etc. I think the amount of data I have rules online storage out. Should I just get two USB disks and leave one at a reasonably save location? I think this must be a common problem today. And yes — before you ask — I do know that the first thing to do is to go through your collection and dump what is not worth keeping."
Idle

Halo Elite Cosplay Puts Others To Shame 115 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the using-your-time-wisely dept.
AndrewGOO9 writes "Pete Mander, a special effects artist from Ontario, Canada seems like he might have either had way too much time on his hands or just really enjoys Halo. Either way, this is one of those costumes that makes all of the cosplayers at a con feel like their best efforts just weren't quite up to par."
It's funny.  Laugh.

Newsweek Easter Egg Reports Zombie Invasion 93

Posted by kdawson
from the it-takes-braaains dept.
danielkennedy74 writes "Newsweek.com becomes the latest in a long list of sites that will reveal an Easter egg if you enter the Konami code correctly (up, up, down, down, left, right, left, right, b, a, enter). This is a cheat code that appeared in many of Konami's video games, starting around 1986 — my favorite places to use it were Contra and Life Force, 30 lives FTW. The Easter egg was probably included by a developer unbeknownst to the Newsweek powers that be. It's reminiscent of an incident that happened at ESPN last year, involving unicorns."
Microsoft

Microsoft "Courier" Pictures 230

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the bandwagon-or-shark-jumping dept.
tekgoblin writes to let us know that Gizmodo has some early shots of the new prototype "Courier" booklet (foldable tablet) on the way from Microsoft. "Courier is a real device, and we've heard that it's in the 'late prototype' stage of development. It's not a tablet, it's a booklet. The dual 7-inch (or so) screens are multitouch, and designed for writing, flicking and drawing with a stylus, in addition to fingers. They're connected by a hinge that holds a single iPhone-esque home button. Statuses, like wireless signal and battery life, are displayed along the rim of one of the screens. On the back cover is a camera, and it might charge through an inductive pad, like the Palm Touchstone charging dock for Pre."

The meta-Turing test counts a thing as intelligent if it seeks to devise and apply Turing tests to objects of its own creation. -- Lew Mammel, Jr.

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