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Comment: Re:Correction: (Score 1) 338

by Aqualung812 (#47728137) Attached to: FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

People that live in not so profitable areas need to pay more for living there, not offset the cost on other customers that have done nothing to deserve it.

Many of those people live in not so profitable areas because they are growing food for people in the profitable areas. Not everyone in a rural area is there to get away from it all.
Also, there are many young people that would LOVE to move away from the sticks, but without access to the Internet at a young age, they'll be stuck on the farm, at Walmart or in the energy business.

Comment: Why do cats get to run free? (Score 1) 110

by Aqualung812 (#47648893) Attached to: Connected Collar Lets Your Cat Do the War-Driving

Only loosely on-topic, but why is it socially acceptable for many cat owners to simply let them have the run of the neighborhood?

As a dog owner, I have to keep my dogs strictly controlled, but neighbor's cats will shit all over the place and cause my dogs to go nuts as it flaunts across the front porch.

Is it just because OMG DOG ATTACKS?

Comment: Re:So 60% positive ? (Score 2) 256

by Aqualung812 (#47615507) Attached to: 40% Of People On Terror Watch List Have No Terrorist Ties

You're misunderstand the point. This is simple logic.

A terrorist can have an affiliation with a group, or act independently.

So, a person can be in three states:
A: not a terrorist,
B: a terrorist without group affiliation
C: a terrorist with an affiliation.

The list contains 60% of the people in group C. 40% are either A or B. All of the ones that are B still fit the criteria for the watch list, so those are valid. There isn't enough info to tell us if the distribution is 60% C, 40% B, and 0% A (which would be perfect), or if there is some other mixture where people in group A are listed but shouldn't be, so we don't know how inaccurate the watch list is.

Comment: Re:It's almost sane(really) (Score 1) 502

by Aqualung812 (#47583651) Attached to: Judge: US Search Warrants Apply To Overseas Computers

As EU law would NOT allow me to release that information...

Is that a true statement?
My understanding, which may be wrong, is that EU law would not compel you to release that information. However, if you chose to (because you wanted to be released from jail in the US), then the EU would not prevent you.

Comment: Re:It's almost sane(really) (Score 1) 502

by Aqualung812 (#47583499) Attached to: Judge: US Search Warrants Apply To Overseas Computers

Your case is only true if Dutch law PREVENTED YOU from accessing your own system.

You own the computer, therefore your access of the system is legal.

You are in US custody, and can be compelled to provide items under court order.

You then legally access your own system remotely, then retrieve the items in question.

Comment: Re:It's almost sane(really) (Score 1) 502

by Aqualung812 (#47582455) Attached to: Judge: US Search Warrants Apply To Overseas Computers

Ok, so we agree. I accept and agree that you could try to gain asylum in Amsterdam as soon as you walk off the plane.

Now, take your analogy to what TFA is actually talking about. You could SSH or RDP to your computer sitting in Amsterdam from a US government computer in the states, and hand it to them after logging in. As you said, the action (the command on the computer you are using) is wholly performed on US soil.

Agree?

Comment: Angry Proliferation Game (Score 1) 224

by Aqualung812 (#47582395) Attached to: China Confirms New Generation of ICBM

You're missing one critical piece in this example: the red button doesn't destroy the planet, it sends a message to other humans outside the room to destroy the planet.

This is how I understand both the US and Russian system to function, but I don't know about the Chinese system. I would hope the designers of these systems realize that leaving this decision up to a politician alone is not the right answer, as the other systems have recognized.

Comment: Re:It's almost sane(really) (Score 1) 502

by Aqualung812 (#47582309) Attached to: Judge: US Search Warrants Apply To Overseas Computers

Let's run with that analogy:

You're presently in the US, the house you own is in Amsterdam.

You'd be correct that the US can't force the Dutch to execute a search warrant.

That is completely irrelevant, though. You're in the US and perhaps in jail awaiting trial. You've been issued a valid order by a US court to permit US law enforcement into your home in Amsterdam. If you interfere, are you not obstructing US justice?

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