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Comment Re:performance (Score 1) 141

According to the page that you have linked, "Below is a partial list of categories in which people have published after joining Google. There is also a list organized by year, and an atom feed is also available. "

These are not research projects specifically funded by Google, but rather published by people working at Google.

Comment Re:Kernel locking (Score 2) 135

Put simply, when you have many independent bits of code competing for finite shared resources/time within the kernel (this is different than code just running in user space), you have to put locks on them so that only 1 thread can access them at a time. Once a lock is released then the another thread gets a turn. With a big lock, only one lock exists for every resource. Although a thread may only need access to a single resource, all of the resources get locked.

The alternative is to implement more fine-grained locks on each resource or set of resources. This allows two threads that are using different kernel resources to potentially execute in parallel. The danger is it's more complex and requires careful coding to avoid deadlock or race conditions. That help?

http://blog.internetnews.com/skerner/2010/11/linux-2637-kills-the-big-kerne.html

Consumer Reports Creates Viruses to Test Software 241

Maximum Prophet writes to mention an MSNBC article about a Consumer Reports plan to test anti-virus software by creating viruses. Security companies are objecting, on the grounds that it's a generally accepted practice not to create viruses for any reason. From the article: "Consumer Reports didn't create thousands of new viruses from scratch. Rather, it took a handful of existing viruses and created hundreds of slight variants, changing the malicious programs just enough to evade detection by an antivirus program with a list of known threats. That's a common trick in the virus writing world; it's standard for a successful virus to inspire dozens of variants. "

How iTunes Hurts Weird Al 495

Johnny X writes "Weird Al Yankovic recently said he makes far less money when you buy from iTunes than when you buy an actual CD. This guy did the math and showed that Weird Al could be losing up to 85% of his record sales income due to the 'weird' ways the record companies compute digital sales. Are all artists getting the shaft like this?"

It is impossible to travel faster than light, and certainly not desirable, as one's hat keeps blowing off. -- Woody Allen

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