Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:It's a trap? (Score 4, Interesting) 203

by Ansoni-San (#35184912) Attached to: <em>Crysis 2</em> Leaked Over a Month Before Launch

... This is a ridiculously huge blunder for such a huge company and they've pointed fingers at piracy before ...

Finally, someone talking about the main point. Exactly. This has nothing to do with piracy at all; along with any damage caused. They fucked up, plain and simple.

The tone of their response to the leak just sounds like posturing, by a management that may be looking to either impose some hair-brained DRM scheme, or more than likely *hang on to their jobs*. Ridiculous.

It's this new breed of management that is turning the PC gaming platform to shit and FUD.
Piracy is like the new "the dog ate my homework" for the 21st century.

Comment: Re:Why not html forms? (Score 1) 216

by Ansoni-San (#30663390) Attached to: Adobe Security Chief Defends JavaScript Support
You sound like a back-end programmer that is bitter his crappy HTML table-generator doesn't cut it anymore.

1. It's W3C not WC3.
2. Why should a non-geek care about W3C standards? They can still code in any broken HTML they feel like if the browser displays it properly. The only reason they'd care is if they're trying to pass it off as professional or paid work. In which case they should work to the quality their client requires or stop lying about their skills

All UI programming is complicated and tricky, this is well known. As languages become more and more abstracted from the nitty-gritty details of interacting with the OS, they become more and more focused on abstract concepts such as objects and their interactions. HTML defines objects (nodes, their attributes, types), CSS and JS define how they interact. If you are so narrow-minded in regards to the tools you use to define or implement your solution then I'm afraid you don't have a very bright future in this field.

Try your hand at some real UI programming for local applications for a while and you'll realise that HTML/CSS/JS is really the UI toolkit you wish you always had. See how long it takes you to write a UI engine to achieve custom behaviour it would have taken an hour or two to achieve using HTML/CSS/JS.

Comment: Re:Lessig on what plex is really important (Score 1) 106

by Ansoni-San (#30614484) Attached to: Codeplex 100 Day Deadline Passes Unremarked
Bullshit. Those people that Microsoft employ already had degrees / education in the field they work in.

You think that if Microsoft wasn't around they'd suddenly lose all interest in their industries? You think that computers aren't a commodity? Someone or something would _have_ to fill the space. And that something and those companies would provide jobs.

The only way that argument holds is if the size of the industry was completely dependant on Microsoft, and that if they were not here people would simply do without computers. A ridiculous idea.

Microsoft don't make any wild innovations, whether they have great products or not. They don't provide anything irreplacable to the industry at all. If they disappeared tomorrow I fail to see any huge change in the nature of the industry, apart from the practical issues of an abandoned platform. Actually I can see a lot of good, healthy change coming from it, as long as it happened slow enough.

Comment: Re:Americans have no correct 'english'. (Score 1) 95

by Ansoni-San (#29584027) Attached to: AT&amp;T Calls Google a Hypocrite On Net Neutrality
Actually no, it's simple really. English is the language spoken in England, and however it evolves there. "English" is pretty accurate on its own. Nothing can change that fact...It's right there in the word!
Other dialects? great! But when it comes to nitpicking about the definition of "English", there's no argument.

Comment: Re:Really? (Score 2, Informative) 73

by Ansoni-San (#28657905) Attached to: Facebook Sued Over Data Access

If you want a copy of any information that you post on facebook, keep a copy on your own computer. Facebook provides a free service, and if they don't think there's any value in you being able to take that data out, then that's their perogative.

I don't know where you are but in the UK there's this thing called the Data Protection Act[wikipedia.org]
So at least here it's not their perogative as to if you get to take your data out. The most they can charge you for it is £10.

Comment: Re:Acid 3 test (Score 1) 437

by Ansoni-San (#28353601) Attached to: Opera 10.0 Released, With Integrated Web Server Functionality

I would pitch Acid 3 compliance in this manner: This web browser is 100% compliant with the proper web rendering standards. The more compliant your web browser is, the less likely your web browser will break. You can take that to the bank. You spend less time with a broken browser, and more time enjoying a cold one.

Except, you know, Opera isn't 100% compliant with CSS 2 or 2.1, and Acid 3 doesn't test for 100% compliance.

Comment: Re:awkward fact, may ruin exciting story (Score 1) 503

by Ansoni-San (#28337883) Attached to: Mono Squeezed Into Debian Default Installation
Well if you kill Tomboy there'll be no Gnote. So it makes no sense to consider Gnote an alternative to Tomboy.

All that Tomboy and Gnote users will be left with are these developers which have clearly demonstrated their lack of software design skills, leadership, or vision. Which indeed hurts everyone because it means one less high quality Unix/Linux desktop app.

Comment: Re:My opinion (Score 1) 440

by Ansoni-San (#25405987) Attached to: Microsoft Considers "Instant On" Windows
At work it sometimes takes me an hour to get in. Yes, it's because the network is crap even though we've got money falling out of our asses. (I guess IT doesn't get any, or they're too lazy to improve things)

Either way, there's your anecdotal evidence. Just as useful as your's. GP was talking about a work environment, which usually means a network.
NASA

+ - Radical Transparency at NASA?!

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Aaron Rowe over at Wired has an article about a couple of young scientists at NASA's Ames Research Center working to open source the space program through software development and other ways to allow the public to participate in real NASA programs. According to Robert Schingler, the NASA CoLab project manager, "CoLab is building an infrastructure to encourage and facilitate direct participation from the talented and interested public..." Apparently, the group holds weekly meetings on their island in the popular online virtual world Second Life. This should be of real interest to Slashdotters. The article also notes that there will be a massive science and technology party at NASA Ames this Friday night open to the public. I don't know about you, but as my first opportunity to visit the inside of a NASA center, I'm sure going!"

Some people have a great ambition: to build something that will last, at least until they've finished building it.

Working...