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Comment Re:Distraction? (Score 4, Interesting) 371

you said

I can't see how this would be anything but a distraction and counter-productive.

TFA said

"The presence of these girls have greatly improved their job efficiency and motivation."

Personally, I find that when I'm happy I'm far more productive than when I'm unhappy.
"Wasting" time improving my mood could easily result in more useful work being done overall.

Comment Re: Sue them (Score 1) 224

It's not like you have to hire a team of lawyers to prove libel, and the lawyer's costs would be recoverable if you won the suit.
Plus if they've sent out hundreds of these take down notices, that would be a pretty big class - I bet you could find a lawyer who would work on that kind of class action suit on a contingency basis.
They might try and drag the suit out for years, but they have to pay their lawyers too, it's going to cost them a lot more than it would cost you.

Comment Why just online? (Score 1) 318

I'd like to delete everything about my prior-to-18 life, including yearbook photos I didn't want taken in the first place.

Instead of removing stuff from the internet, how about giving people a new identity when they come of age?
Let them pick a new name, issue a new drivers license/id card, SS number, etc.

Comment Re:Accuracy not speed. (Score 1) 371

When a house is burning down, the fire department shouldn't step back and let the dust settle.
When someone reports a house is burning down, the firetrucks should roll right away.
But when they get to the house and there is no fire, they shouldn't hack down the door and start spraying water everywhere.

The lesson here is "news sources are unreliable", not "delay is a good idea".

Comment Re:Why? (Score 1) 301

ref 2; one person reported 15% of their CDs were beginning to fail, and 85% were not.
This is supposed to be evidence that not-failing is atypical?

Links to stories are easy to find these days, here's one from the other side;

A testament to the durability of Audio CDs is a natural aging study conducted by the Library of Congress. The study found discs that, despite exhibiting both unacceptable levels of BLER and uncorrectable errors, remained playable and failed to exhibit noticeable audio defects. [19]

DVD rot has been debunked as a chronic problem, yet it remains a persistent urban legend. [20] While there have been documented cases of deterioration in specific discs, they appear to be the result of poor manufacturing. [21]

Personally, I trust the Library of Congress analysis, but hey - believe what you want.

The shortest distance between two points is under construction. -- Noelie Alito