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Comment: Re:Do we really need this? (Score 1) 47

Do we really need yet another file server distro?

I'm a little more confused around the goal. It's designed to share eBooks in places that have no infrastructure, maybe not even a reliable electrical grid. Okay... but share with what? People in those parts of the world aren't running around with iPads.

Comment: Re:I'm not convinced (Score 1) 387

by Anonymous Psychopath (#48169755) Attached to: Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

What's interesting to me is that big, audacious ideas that succeed are so often led by people with borderline, clearly flawed personalities. Napoleon, Edison, Disney, Hitchcock, Patton, Jobs, Gates, Balmer, the list goes on and on.

You had me until Balmer.

Why? MS unarguably owns the enterprise desktop productivity suite with an iron fist. Hard to call that anything but success (for him, anyway).

Comment: Re:I'm not convinced (Score 1) 387

by Anonymous Psychopath (#48164471) Attached to: Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

"One of the reasons we have this culture of strong language, that admittedly many people find off-putting, is that when it comes to technical people with strong opinions and with a strong drive to do something technically superior, you end up having these opinions show up as sometimes pretty strong language," he said. "On the Internet, nobody can hear you being subtle."

Excuses, excuses. One can easily be heard and still be professional if he wants to. Linux alone is so cool and influential that the leader of the project will certainly get noticed even without peppering everything with insults and cursing.

Could it be different is a really interesting question, mostly because it's impossible to answer. Big projects that span decades are the result of thousands of decisions, perhaps hundreds of thousands of interactions. Linus has found a certain style that appears to work for him and the team closest to him so I won't say it's wrong, but if his style were different would he have attracted different people to that inner circle, and would those people have been more effective or less? Can't say.

What's interesting to me is that big, audacious ideas that succeed are so often led by people with borderline, clearly flawed personalities. Napoleon, Edison, Disney, Hitchcock, Patton, Jobs, Gates, Balmer, the list goes on and on.

Comment: Re:What about books? (Score 1) 406

by Anonymous Psychopath (#48141329) Attached to: Flight Attendants Want Stricter Gadget Rules Reinstated

Why were books, magazines and newspapers never banned before? They're just as much of a distraction (at least, they used to be until smartphones took over). Heck, they give away magazines in every seat pocket.

My thoughts exactly. I was expecting the in-flight magazine folks and SkyMall to be the ones pushing the issue. The only time I'd read them is takeoffs and landings.

What they ought to do is build the safety briefing into their mobile apps. They know when I've boarded the plane, so they could simply set a timer that triggers ten minutes later and prompts me to look at a video or something on my mobile. Frequent flyers would still ignore it, but at least the flight attendants wouldn't get their knickers in a bunch.

I feel for them sometimes. It must be hard to perform the briefing, especially the part where you have to demonstrate how a seatbelt works. The seatbelt design hasn't changed since before many of them were born, yet they are still required to stand there and demonstrate.

Comment: Re:We don't know the details (Score 1) 742

by Anonymous Psychopath (#48084797) Attached to: Complain About Comcast, Get Fired From Your Job

There probably aren't any recordings. It's typically only the contact center that records conversations. The article says the firing was a result from an ethics investigation launched when Comcast called to complain about him. It implies that the ethics violation centers around him using his position with his employer to further his claim against Comcast. Say, for example, he obtained the controller's name and contact information using his employee's resources. Or maybe he implied he could make an error that would cost Comcast just as Comcast had done to him. Or maybe it's just as he presented it and Comcast used their leverage to get rid of an annoyance. I've no idea, really, but there has to be a lot more to this story than just what's in the article. It's impossible to draw any real conclusions.

Comment: Re:It's true (Score 1) 267

by Anonymous Psychopath (#48022851) Attached to: Former GM Product Czar: Tesla a "Fringe Brand"

It's a fringe brand in that Ferrari is a fringe brand. I don't think most people wouldn't want one but I don't know a soul who has one. Very few have seen them. They aren't exactly a larger brand. IF they can mass produce a model in a reasonable price range comparable to a modern model of car it will take off. Right now it is in the fringe but I don't think it will stay there. That's exactly what the guy in the article said. He didn't say Tesla was a bad idea or that it won't take off, he said it's not there yet but this next model could very well take it there.

It will be exciting to see where we go from here.

It depends on where you live. In California they are almost commonplace, especially in the metro areas. A closer cousin to Tesla than Ferrari would be Audi, BMW, Mercedes, Porsche, etc. They are expensive and only the affluent can afford them, but not so crazy expensive that you need to be a CEO or rock star.

Comment: Re:geek or not ~ pfSense (Score 1) 238

Yup, pfSense is Good Stuff. On the hardware side it'll run on damn near anything. I run mine on an old Celeron machine with traffic shaping, no issues. I don't know that I'd want more than one or two simultaneous VPN users with that compute capacity, though.

Comment: Re:One Sure Way (Score 1) 275

by Anonymous Psychopath (#47884273) Attached to: California Tells Businesses: Stop Trying To Ban Consumer Reviews

Review sites like Yelp and the sort will throw up every roadblock at any attempt by any court to de-anonymize a user.

Courts don't like being messed with. They try that a few times, and they'll eventually get smacked-down, hard.

In short, it's impossible to identify a poster

Bull.

Identifying and prosecuting are two different things. The former can be impractical, the latter can be impossible.

First, the company damaged carries the legal and financial burden of just bringing suit. That probably involves hiring an attorney and possibly a detective. Small companies will often not have those capabilities.

Then, assuming they can find them, they have to serve the offender. Good luck getting that done in Mumbai.

Then, assuming the offender don't show up to defend themselves and you win your case, you have to collect on the damages. Again, good luck with that.

New crypt. See /usr/news/crypt.

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