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Comment: Re:Missing Option: I HATE fireworks. (Score 2) 328

by metlin (#47386677) Attached to: On 4th of July:

Yes, because anyone who cannot afford to pay for a baby sitter should forego ever eating out or watching a movie.

And the reason you find more babies out is for a few reasons:

1. Families are smaller and there is less of grandma and grandpa living 'round the block. As such, you are left with no family help.

2. Economic realities make childcare extreme expensive, even in double income families.

3. Single parents are also a lot more common, and the single parent already has someone taking care of the kid during the day. They can't magically "leave" the kid behind for everything that they do, just because other assholes in public find them to be an inconvenience.

If I can't get a sitter, I'll do my best to calm my baby when I'm out in public. If you don't like it, you can bugger off.

Comment: Re:Missing Option: I HATE fireworks. (Score 1) 328

by metlin (#47385865) Attached to: On 4th of July:

You know, I cannot understand the recent cultural backlash against babies.

Yes, babies cry. They cry at night, they cry in restaurants, and they cry on airplanes. They cry when they are hungry, when they are tired, when they're pooping, and when they need a diaper change. And often, they cry for apparently no reason at all.

As a father of a four month old, I can tell you that we parents aren't exactly pleased to hear our babies cry, either. We don't want our kids to be in pain, and we want them to be happy. We are acutely conscious of bothering others, and we feel helpless about the whole thing.

But you know what's worse? Assholes who cannot stop complaining about crying babies. Guess what? It's how human beings are. You cried too. So did every human being who's ever lived.

So, get over it. Babies cry. Live with it. If you don't like it, find a place without any humans who procreate. And show some empathy, for crying out loud.

Comment: Re:How about a home brew dynamic DNS system? (Score 1) 495

by Nethead (#47357533) Attached to: Microsoft Takes Down No-IP.com Domains

Because us lower 4 digits don't like to re-invent the wheel:)

Nice setup though, I'll keep those tips in mind if I need to roll my own. I'm looking for a client and server package that can be installed quickly on a client computer/router. A client end that could run on OpenWRT would be really sweet.

Comment: How about a home brew dynamic DNS system? (Score 2) 495

by Nethead (#47357359) Attached to: Microsoft Takes Down No-IP.com Domains

I've looked a bit but never really found a package to do this, although it's been a few years. I've got a BSD box, a static IP and some domain names. How would I set it up so that other hosts could use this in a dynamic way to set forward DNS records if they were on an ISP's ever changing DHCP addresses?

In other words, how can I roll my own no-ip.com system without being a Vixie level hacker?

Comment: Re:Write your name with a pen? (Score 2) 81

Yes, clearly I was unaware of this fact when I made this comment. Because, you know, it's an all-or-nothing world where people offering product features tell their users to do it their way or stick it.

If you cannot offer a helpful suggestion when someone questions something they aren't comfortable with, perhaps you should cut down the snark and just ignore the comment.

Comment: Write your name with a pen? (Score 4, Insightful) 81

Really? Some of us really enjoy our books -- as someone who has a personal library with ~4,000 books, I would be appalled if I had to write on any of their pages with a pen.

Not because I am planning on selling any of them, but because to me, I just see it as damaging the book.

A good many of them are autographed or antiquarian books, and the last thing I'd ever want to do is sign them with a *pen*.

I find the whole deal oddly disturbing -- maybe it's just me as a bibliophile, but writing on a book sounds like a sacrilege.

Comment: Re:Be polite (Score 1) 286

by Nethead (#47339069) Attached to: What To Do If Police Try To Search Your Phone Without a Warrant

I've run into this before as a DirecTV installer. Had biscuits and tea with a very nice East European family after I performed the install, which can be sometimes more invasive than a police search, they don't drill holes in your outside walls often or tear your media center apart. I saw that it was expected and they went to a lot of work to provide a nice sit & chat time. It took about 15 minutes of trying to understand very bad English, smile, nod, and make-nice, but it seemed very important to them. It was a bit odd at the time since I had a trainee with me (maybe the best lesson she learned) but ten years later and I still recall it with a warm heart. I see why you decided on this path.

I'm an atheist with a very Catholic upbringing. I'm very glad that I've had the service and humility of the Church teachings (and very awesome parents) to show me how to love my fellow humans. I try to be as warm and inviting to any that enter my home, or anyone that I meet day to day. Not that I'm always great at that, but I'm trying.

It's nice to know there are others out there doing the same.

Comment: Re:They should do it here: (Score 1) 104

by Nethead (#47338963) Attached to: Protesters Launch a 135-Foot Blimp Over the NSA's Utah Data Center

Never mind, upon further Googling it seems that they are shutting down the Yakima Research Facility. (Or as the locals called it, the ball bearing plant.)

http://q13fox.com/2013/04/04/n...

In a 2002 interview with the Newhouse News Service, Bamford said the Yakima facility obtained about 2 million intercepts per hour at that time.

"Those who will be able to conquer software will be able to conquer the world." -- Tadahiro Sekimoto, president, NEC Corp.

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