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Submission + - Linus Torvalds: Apple's HFS+ is probably the worst file-system ever (itworld.com)

sfcrazy writes: It’s been long since we heard a good rant from Linus Torvalds. Linux doesn't rant much, but when he does he hits the nail and he doesn't mince worlds and this time he targeted Apple's HFS+. Linus says, "The true horrors of HFS+ are not in how it’s not a great filesystem, but in how it’s actively designed to be a bad filesystem by people who thought they had good ideas."

Submission + - Why don't all consumer motherboards use SODIMMs?

bluefoxlucid writes: I have an extra SODIMM from upgrading a Mini-ITX, which could go into a DDR3 laptop; I also have an extra 8GB DDR3 DIMM, which can go into a desktop. As far as I can tell, they have the same timing, speed, heat concerns, capacities, and cost. Standardizing SODIMMs would make the market demand easier to predict, stabilizing supply-side risk and reducing costs to manufacturers. SODIMMs on desktop boards would reduce space usage, allowing for more slots or bigger on-board feature chipsets. Why don't desktops use SODIMMs rather than DIMMs?

Submission + - What most people get wrong about science

StartsWithABang writes: Convinced that the risks of nuclear power are too great for the world? That air travel is unsafe? That GMOs are poisoning our world and our bodies? That fluoridated drinking water causes long-term harm? That climate change isn't a manmade thing? Or that vaccines cause more harm than good? Unless you're willing to drop your ideology and completely cast it aside, you'll never accept what science says about these issues, and therefore you're preventing us all from making a better world. Cut it out!

Submission + - Why Munich will stick with Linux (opensource.com)

Jason Hibbets writes: "There are many solved problems in open source. Groupware is not one of them," Georg Greve, co-founder and CEO of Kolab System starts off his post highlighting recent features of the latest release of the Kolab groupware project. He calls out a few newly elected politicans that don't like the current set-up, but says that thousands of users don't have the same experience. "In other words: The very problem used to criticise the LiMux desktop is already being solved."

Submission + - U.S. Military Drones Migrating to Linux (linuxgizmos.com)

DeviceGuru writes: Raytheon is switching its UAV control system from Solaris to Linux for U.S. military drones, starting with a Northrop Grumman MQ-8C Fire Scout helicopter. Earlier this month Raytheon entered into a $15.8 million contract with the U.S. Navy to upgrade Raytheon’s control systems for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), according to a May 2 Avionics Intelligence report. The overhaul is designed to implement more modern controls to help ground-based personnel control UAVs. Raytheon’s tuxified version of its Vertical Takeoff and Landing Unmanned Air Vehicle (VTUAV) Tactical Control System (TCS) will also implement universal UAV control qualities. As a result the TCS can be used in in all U.S. Navy, Air Force, Army, and Marine Corps UAVs that weigh at least 20 pounds. By providing an open standard, the common Linux-based platform is expected to reduce costs by limiting the types of UAV control systems that need to be built and maintained for each craft.
Censorship

Submission + - The ISP--The Uncommon Carrier

Anon-Admin writes: Every time there is a question of an ISP monitoring, censoring, or blocking content some one comments about Common Carrier requirements. It is true that most do not make attempts to claim Common Carrier Status. There are many pros and Cons to being a common carrier and it is best summed up in Geoff Huston's article The ISP — The Uncommon Carrier

"Today the short-term expedient measures abound. There is enormous pressure on ISPs from both the Internet's user base and numerous legislatures to take an active position of being responsible — and liable, for the content on the networks and the actions of their clients. If left unchecked, this will have severe longer-term consequences for free speech, basic personal privacy, and uncensored, nondiscriminatory, universal access to the Internet. And when the user base comes to recognize the debased value of such a compromised communications system, they will inevitably look to other means of communication that have retained their essential integrity as a common carriage service."

Maybe we should push for ISP's to be covered as Common Carriers. What do you think?
Education

Submission + - Linux as a Short-Lived Project

LinuxNut writes: Continuing their historical series looking at the early Linux kernels, KernelTrap is discussing the 0.02 and 0.03 kernels released in late 1991. Though the actual source code has been lost to time, the article offers an interesting collection of emails by Linux creator Linus Torvalds about his new operating system, 'for hackers by a hacker.' Version 0.02 was the first usable release, gaining the ability to run programs such as gcc if compiled on Minix. Version 0.03 fixed buffer-cache issues that made it possible to compile gcc from Linux. Interestingly enough, at this point Linus thought of Linux as a short-lived project saying, 'wait for Hurd if you want something real. It's fun hacking it, though (but I'm biased).' Though not short-lived, Linux has continued to prove to be fun to hack.

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