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Editor-in-Chief of the Next Web: Adblockers Are Immoral 618 618

lemur3 writes: Hot on the heels of the recent implementation of Canvas Ads (allowing advertisers to use the full page) Martin Bryant, the Editor-in-Chief of The Next Web, wrote a piece that, ostensibly, calls out mobile carriers in Europe for offering ad blocking as a service. He writes: "Display ads are still an important bread-and-butter income stream. Taking delight in denying publishers that revenue shows either sociopathic tendencies or ignorance of economic realities." While referring to those using ad blocking as sociopathic is likely not to win many fans, this mindset seems to be prevalent in certain circles, as discussed previously on Slashdot. Martin closes his piece with a warning: "For all their sins, ads fuel much of the Web. Cut them out and you're strangling the diversity of online voices and publishers – and I don't think consumers really want that."

Comment I have the solution (Score 1) 285 285

Get your own domain name.
Pay for your own hosting.
Post whatever you want.
Move to a new host any time you feel the need.

Problem solved.

IMHO, it's foolish to trust a free service to host something you care about and want to see continue indefinitely.

Comment Re:libressl-2.1.3 (Score 1) 97 97

Just because one compiler for one platform fails to support a popular C extension doesn't mean the library isn't portable.

Except that the one platform is Windows, which accounts for the vast majority of desktop PC's and laptops, and a significant chunk of servers. And the one compiler is the standard for Windows, used by the vast majority of Windows developers.

You don't have to like this, but it is the truth.

In my opinion, any software that can't compile on Windows using the native toolchain doesn't qualify as "portable". That doesn't make it bad software. It just isn't "portable" software.

Comment Re:libressl-2.1.3 (Score 1) 97 97

libressl supports pretty much any unix-like OS

Oh good, both Country and Western.

I know there's a guy working on Windows support as well.

Let me know what the guy working on Windows support actually gets it working. Until then it doesn't count. And by "working", I mean working with the Microsoft toolchain, which like it or not, is the official and most widely used toolchain for Windows.

Comment Re:libressl-2.1.3 (Score 5, Insightful) 97 97

libressl is NOT portable. Supporting BSD and Linux is not the definition of "portable" (see also: "We play both types of music: Country and Western"). The libressl code depends on the non-standard #include_next preprocessor directive, so it can only build with GCC (and probably clang, which emulates many GCC-isms). Forget about building on Windows using Microsoft's C compiler.

OpenSSL remains the only portable SSL library that can be used by both open source and commercial developers alike. Which is really a shame, because OpenSSL sucks. All the bad things the libressl people have said about OpenSSL are absolutely true.

Communications

The Slow Death of Voice Mail 237 237

HughPickens.com writes: Duane D. Stanford reports at Bloomberg that Coca-Cola's Atlanta Headquarters is the latest big company to ditch its old-style voice mail, which requires users to push buttons to scroll through messages and listen to them one at a time. The change went into effect this month, and a standard outgoing message now throws up an electronic stiff arm, telling callers to try later or use "an alternative method" to contact the person. Techies have predicted the death of voice mail for years as smartphones co-opt much of the office work once performed by telephones and desktop computers. Younger employees who came of age texting while largely ignoring voice mail are bringing that habit into the workforce. "People north of 40 are schizophrenic about voice mail," says Michael Schrage. "People under 35 scarcely ever use it." Companies are increasingly combining telephone, e-mail, text and video systems into unified Internet-based systems that eliminate overlap. "Many people in many corporations simply don't have the time or desire to spend 25 minutes plowing through a stack of 15 to 25 voice mails at the end or beginning of the day," says Schrage.

In 2012, Vonage reported its year-over-year voicemail volumes dropped 8%. More revealing, the number of people bothering to retrieve those messages plummeted 14%. More and more personal and corporate voicemail boxes now warn callers that their messages are rarely retrieved and that they're better off sending emails or texts. "The truly productive have effectively abandoned voicemail, preferring to visually track who's called them on their mobiles," concludes Schrage. "A communications medium that was once essential has become as clunky and irrelevant as Microsoft DOS and carbon paper."
Google

Spanish Media Group Wants Gov't Help To Keep Google News In Spain 191 191

English-language site The Spain Report reports that Google's response to mandated payments for linking to and excerpting from Spanish news media sources — namely, shutting down Google News in Spain — doesn't sit well with Spanish Newspaper Publishers' Association, which issued a statement [Thursday] night saying that Google News was "not just the closure of another service given its dominant market position," recognising that Google's decision "will undoubtedly have a negative impact on citizens and Spanish businesses. Given the dominant position of Google (which in Spain controls almost all of the searches in the market and is an authentic gateway to the Internet), AEDE requires the intervention of Spanish and community authorities, and competition authorities, to effectively protect the rights of citizens and companies." Irene Lanzaco, a spokeswoman for AEDE, told The Spain Report by telephone that "we're not asking Google to take a step backwards, we've always been open to negotiations with Google" but, she said: "Google has not taken a neutral stance. Of course they are free to close their business, but one thing is the closure of Google News and quite another the positioning in the general index." Asked if the newspaper publishers' association had received any complaints from its members since Wednesday's announcement by Google, Mrs. Lanzaco refused to specify, but said: "Spanish publishers talk to AEDE constantly."

Comment Re:Thank you! (Score 2, Interesting) 125 125

... check out OpenBSD before checking out FreeBSD, and I cannot stress this enough. FreeBSD developers don't use their own operating system; they run it in a Virtual machine on their Macs, and it shows.

Citation needed.

Suspend/resume has been broken there since 2008, and drivers for any recent Intel graphics adapter will not run (you cannot switch from Xorg to a console and back) properly.

Yeah, it can suck to run a server-focused OS on a desktop/laptop.

FreeBSD devs do not care about their OS

This is objectively false. Any devs working for free must care, of they'd hack on something else. Any devs being paid must have an employer who cares. The problem is that the people hacking/funding FreeBSD don't care about the same parts of the system that you do.

Comment Re:are the debian support forums down? (Score 3, Informative) 286 286

... the way systemd has turned into something similar to the bloated beast that is the Windows 'svchost.exe' ...

+1 to the anti-systemd sentiment.

-1 to using svchost.exe to make your case. svchost is just a container process. The real issue is the Windows architecture/philosophy that encourages a proliferation of services.

(I like Unix and I like Windows. Each has their place. Trying to turn one into the other is a big mistake.)

Government

Conservative Groups Accuse FCC of Helping Net Neutrality Advocates File Comments 283 283

jfruh writes Conservative groups opposed to net neutrality have a beef with the FCC, claiming the commission helped pro-net neutrality advocates file comments on the subject without similarly helping opponents. In other news out of this camp, it turns out American Commitment, an advocacy group with ties to the Republican billionaire Koch brothers, sent out 2.4 million letters to Congress opposing net neutrality but only collected about 814,000 signatures. The group then generated three letters to Congress for each person signing the petition, one letter to each of the signer's two senators and one to each signer's representative.
Cloud

Native Netflix Support Is Coming To Linux 178 178

sfcrazy writes: Native support for Netflix is coming to Linux, thanks to their move from Silverlight to HTML5, Mozilla and Google Chrome. Paul Adolph from Netflix proposed a solution to Ubuntu developers: "Netflix will play with Chrome stable in 14.02 if NSS version 3.16.2 or greater is installed. If this version is generally installed across 14.02, Netflix would be able to make a change so users would no longer have to hack their User-Agent to play." The newer version of NSS is set to go out with the next security update.
Music

U2 and Apple Collaborate On 'Non-Piratable, Interactive Format For Music' 358 358

Squiff writes U2 and Apple are apparently collaborating on a new, "interactive format for music," due to launch in "about 18 months." (A direct interview is available at Time, but paywalled.) Bono said the new tech "can't be pirated" and will re-imagine the role of album artwork. Marco Arment has some suitably skeptical commentary: "Full albums are as interesting to most people today as magazines. Single songs and single articles killed their respective larger containers. ... This alleged new format will cost a fortune to produce: people have to take the photos, design the interactions, build the animations, and make the deals with Apple. Bono’s talking point about helping smaller bands is ridiculous ... There's nothing Apple or Bono can do to make people care enough about glorified liner notes. People care about music and convenience, period. As for “music that can’t be pirated”, I ask again, what decade is this? That ship has not only sailed long ago, but has circled the world hundreds of times, sunk, been dragged up, turned into a tourist attraction, went out of business, and been gutted and retrofitted as a more profitable oil tanker."

Comment Good luck with that (Score 1) 139 139

Option #1: Valve has no physical presence in Australia, and tells the Australian government to go fuck themselves. Government responds by banning Valve from doing business in Australia. Good luck enforcing that. To the extent they do manage to enforce it, it will be taking action against Australian citizens, since they have no power over Valve.

Option #2: Valve doubles prices in Australia. Y'all can have all the consumer protection you want, but you're going to pay for it.

Comment The fix is to delete the font cache (Score 5, Informative) 179 179

The way to fix this is to delete \Windows\System32\FNTCACHE.DAT. The file will automatically be regenerated on the next boot.

(Information found on Microsoft Support Forum and used to successfully fix my own system.)

How do you delete the file if you can't boot?

(1) Press F8 during boot to get to the Windows boot manager advanced options screen.
(2) Select "Repair".
(3) Provide password for a local account that's a member of the Administrator group.
(4) Select "Command Prompt".
(5) Find drive letter assigned to Windows partition (may not be C: in the repair environment!).
(6) Delete \Windows\System32\FNTCACHE.DAT.
(7) Exit command prompt and reboot system.
(8) Fixed!

----------

And now, since this is /., here is the required Windows bashing...

This bug demonstrates the danger of running your GUI in kernel mode (win32k.sys). One stray pointer can ruin your whole day. In this case the pointer was sufficiently invalid to cause a bugcheck. A stray pointer that silently scribbles on other kernel data structures is even worse.

"Those who would give up essential Safety, to purchase a little temporary Performance, deserve neither Performance nor Safety."

Comment The Mill (Score 2) 125 125

I think NVidia tied their hands by retaining the ARM architecture. I suspect the result will be a "worst of both worlds" processor that doesn't use less power or provide better performance than competitors.

In order execution, exposed pipelines, and software scheduling are not new ideas. They sound great in theory, but never seem to work out in practice. These architectures are unbeatable for certain tasks (e.g. DSP), but success as general purpose processors has been elusive. History is littered with the corpses of dead architectures that attempted (and failed) to tame the beast.

Personally, I'm very excited about the Mill architecture. If anybody can tame the beast, it will be these guys.

At these prices, I lose money -- but I make it up in volume. -- Peter G. Alaquon

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