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Comment: Re:Thank you! (Score 2, Interesting) 125

by Anon E. Muss (#48289669) Attached to: OpenBSD 5.6 Released

... check out OpenBSD before checking out FreeBSD, and I cannot stress this enough. FreeBSD developers don't use their own operating system; they run it in a Virtual machine on their Macs, and it shows.

Citation needed.

Suspend/resume has been broken there since 2008, and drivers for any recent Intel graphics adapter will not run (you cannot switch from Xorg to a console and back) properly.

Yeah, it can suck to run a server-focused OS on a desktop/laptop.

FreeBSD devs do not care about their OS

This is objectively false. Any devs working for free must care, of they'd hack on something else. Any devs being paid must have an employer who cares. The problem is that the people hacking/funding FreeBSD don't care about the same parts of the system that you do.

Comment: Re:are the debian support forums down? (Score 3, Informative) 286

by Anon E. Muss (#48176459) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Stop PulseAudio From Changing Sound Settings?

... the way systemd has turned into something similar to the bloated beast that is the Windows 'svchost.exe' ...

+1 to the anti-systemd sentiment.

-1 to using svchost.exe to make your case. svchost is just a container process. The real issue is the Windows architecture/philosophy that encourages a proliferation of services.

(I like Unix and I like Windows. Each has their place. Trying to turn one into the other is a big mistake.)

Comment: Good luck with that (Score 1) 139

by Anon E. Muss (#47783659) Attached to: Australian Consumer Watchdog Takes Valve To Court

Option #1: Valve has no physical presence in Australia, and tells the Australian government to go fuck themselves. Government responds by banning Valve from doing business in Australia. Good luck enforcing that. To the extent they do manage to enforce it, it will be taking action against Australian citizens, since they have no power over Valve.

Option #2: Valve doubles prices in Australia. Y'all can have all the consumer protection you want, but you're going to pay for it.

Comment: The fix is to delete the font cache (Score 5, Informative) 179

by Anon E. Muss (#47675037) Attached to: Microsoft Black Tuesday Patches Bring Blue Screens of Death

The way to fix this is to delete \Windows\System32\FNTCACHE.DAT. The file will automatically be regenerated on the next boot.

(Information found on Microsoft Support Forum and used to successfully fix my own system.)

How do you delete the file if you can't boot?

(1) Press F8 during boot to get to the Windows boot manager advanced options screen.
(2) Select "Repair".
(3) Provide password for a local account that's a member of the Administrator group.
(4) Select "Command Prompt".
(5) Find drive letter assigned to Windows partition (may not be C: in the repair environment!).
(6) Delete \Windows\System32\FNTCACHE.DAT.
(7) Exit command prompt and reboot system.
(8) Fixed!

----------

And now, since this is /., here is the required Windows bashing...

This bug demonstrates the danger of running your GUI in kernel mode (win32k.sys). One stray pointer can ruin your whole day. In this case the pointer was sufficiently invalid to cause a bugcheck. A stray pointer that silently scribbles on other kernel data structures is even worse.

"Those who would give up essential Safety, to purchase a little temporary Performance, deserve neither Performance nor Safety."

Comment: The Mill (Score 2) 125

I think NVidia tied their hands by retaining the ARM architecture. I suspect the result will be a "worst of both worlds" processor that doesn't use less power or provide better performance than competitors.

In order execution, exposed pipelines, and software scheduling are not new ideas. They sound great in theory, but never seem to work out in practice. These architectures are unbeatable for certain tasks (e.g. DSP), but success as general purpose processors has been elusive. History is littered with the corpses of dead architectures that attempted (and failed) to tame the beast.

Personally, I'm very excited about the Mill architecture. If anybody can tame the beast, it will be these guys.

Comment: Re:Legally correct decision with awful results (Score 1) 303

Splits in the circuits are more common than you might imagine, and the Supreme Court doesn't always resolve them. A lot depends on how substantial the split is. Minor differences don't always get resolved.

In any event, this case isn't "ripe" for appeal to the Supreme Court yet. The Supremes rarely get involved until all lower court proceedings have been exhausted, and this case just got sent back for retrial on the issue of fair use. The process can be maddening for the individual litigants, but it makes sense for the legal system overall.

Comment: Legally correct decision with awful results (Score 5, Informative) 303

(I actually read the court ruling before posting this)

tl;dr version: The results will likely be awful, but the decision appears legally correct.

Google won at trial because the judge decided that the Java API was not copyrightable. I absolutely believe that API's should not be copyrightable, but that isn't what the law says. Copyrightability has a very low threshold. The trial judge screwed up by applying legal standards related to fair use to the question of copyrightability. The appeals court was correct to reverse.

The case now goes back to the district court. There will be a new trail with a new jury, but the only issue will be whether Googe's copying of the Java API is fair use. The original jury deadlocked on this question. Fair use decisions are very subjective, so it's hard to predict how this will turn out. All I can say is that I hope Google wins.

P.S. None of this decision was related to patents. Oracle lost on their patent claims at trial, and that stands.

Comment: Re:It's a trap! (Score 2) 171

by Anon E. Muss (#41896225) Attached to: GM Brings IT Dev Back In House; Self-Driving Caddy In the Works
At the macro level, adding employment to Detroit would be a good thing. At the micro level, it could be a bad thing for individuals who take a job at GM, and then find themselves working in conditions that make Dilbert look good by comparison. I understand "any port in a storm, and any job in a recession." But if you have a choice, would you really want to go to work for somebody who is absolutely hated by many of his prior employees?

Comment: Re:At the end of the day (Score 5, Insightful) 387

by Anon E. Muss (#41155499) Attached to: Why Juries Have No Place In the Patent System

The jury saw that, and decided that that was wrong.

And therein lies the problem. The point of a trial is to decide what is LEGAL. It's great when Right and Wrong correspond to Legal and Illegal, but it doesn't always work out that way. One reason it doesn't is because right vs. wrong can be very subjective, but legal vs. illegal is supposed to be very objective.

I'm concerned that this jury simply got offended that "Samsung copied Apple", and didn't fully consider the prior art that would make such copying perfectly legal. The foreman saying they wanted to "send a message", in clear violation of the judge's instructions, calls the result into question.

Comment: The fight is really all about the codec (Score 2) 211

by Anon E. Muss (#40953689) Attached to: Microsoft Picks Another Web Standards Fight

From a purely technical perspective, Microsoft's proposal may actually be the better choice. The problem is that CU-RTC-Web doesn't mandate a codec, and lets the peers negotiate. Microsoft spins this as being flexible, and at a purely technical level, it is. The problem is that if the standard doesn't mandate some reasonable baseline codec, you're going to end up with implementations that can't talk to each other. Microsoft knows this, and they doesn't care.

Google isn't exactly a Saint either. They know full well that Microsoft and Apple won't implement VP8 (for semi-defensible technical/legal reasons, as well as evil intent). WebRTC with VP8 is unlikely to ever be available on iDevices, and that's a significant chunk of the market. Google knows this, and they don't care.

Linux

+ - [Videos] Linaro engineers talk about the status of Linux on ARM-> 2

Submitted by
Charbax
Charbax writes "Some of the worlds best developers work at Linaro optimizing the future of Linux on ARM. In this 4-hour video series several of them describe software solutions for the upcoming ARM big.LITTLE architecture (ARM Cortex-A15 and ARM Cortex-A7), demonstrate how Linaro Android 4.0.4 runs twice as fast as stock Android 4.0.4 on the TI OMAP4430 Pandaboard, talk about the future of Android, unify the ARM bootloader, combine multiple ARM SoCs into one Linux Kernel for ARM. Canonical works to support ARM Servers, Mark Shuttleworth talks about the opportunity that ARM constitutes for Ubuntu on Laptops and Servers. The CTO of Linaro talks about the next billions of ARM Powered devices that they are working to optimize Linux for."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Sucks for Lightsquared (Score 5, Insightful) 178

by Anon E. Muss (#39043817) Attached to: FCC Bars Lightsquared From Using Airwaves

Really, the FCC and/or the GPS equipment manufacturer should be the ones being penalised.

As a practical matter, there's no way to do that. If you allow Lightspeed to operate, you penalize the USERS of the (allegedly) badly designed GPS devices. It does suck to be Lightspeed, because GPS really is much more important than them.

Economists state their GNP growth projections to the nearest tenth of a percentage point to prove they have a sense of humor. -- Edgar R. Fiedler

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