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Comment: Re:Fantastic ROI (Score 1) 275

by Angrywhiteshoes (#46594253) Attached to: Operation Wants To Mine 10% of All New Bitcoins
Realistically, you have a small point. It's hard to dump large sums. But I can see you probably aren't in the cryptocoin mining community. When I first came up on my huge dump, I had a problem getting rid of them for what I felt it was worth at the time. So... I traded coin-to-coin evenly for every alt-coin that could be sold for cash and was selling. Then dumped for cash on those markets. Granted, my operation was not up to this scale, but at the time, I was making it rain.

Comment: How does this stop me from sharing from a USB? (Score 1) 467

by Angrywhiteshoes (#44047273) Attached to: Altering Text In eBooks To Track Pirates
Is there something I don't know about the reader software on my computer? Is it leaking info about what books I'm reading?

On the other hand, how does anyone know if I put it in dropbox and share my dropbox folder with someone? Or rename the file or strip any identifying meta-data and just host it on a private website that requires password to view?

There's lots of things that don't make sense to me about how this will actually thwart piracy by striking fear into people's hearts. But then again, I (and we) are probably not the intended target(s) of that fear.

Comment: Re:Seems like crossing a line (Score 1) 239

by Angrywhiteshoes (#44041505) Attached to: BitCoin Mining, Other Virtual Activity Taxable Under US Law

If I were to do business in Japan and moved money in and out of a Japanese account for my business in Japan, does the IRS have the right to tax my business in Japan?

The IRS taxes on US business activity... in US currency. Not sure I agree with the IRS getting involved with something like this especially since I think they really don't understand what they are getting involved in.

The IRS taxes Americans on American income. Bitcoin is income for most people involved. They should pay taxes on it.

I already claim it as income.

Comment: Re:Misleading summary (Score 1) 306

The summary "By Algorithm, Not Human Review" implies that the algorithm is somehow evaluating pictures. In fact from TFA it is clear all it is doing is looking for copes of known existing images by hash-code. If it were examining images I would be worried about false positives, but as it just looks for know child porn I cannot see any down-side - this is a good move.

So they store CP and search for CP at the same time? Why is that good?

Comment: Re:I was an ACM President, here is my advice (Score 1) 66

by Angrywhiteshoes (#43897103) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To Start and Manage a University LUG?

Your core will eventually disappear

College is a revolving door and the 5 core members who really tied the group together will graduate and you will be left with people who don't care as much. I saw this happen to ACM while I was at my school before I got involved with some friends forming the "new core," then we graduated and my dept chair emailed me saying "ACM is now dead." So you need to ALWAYS be advertising and finding people who are interested, or you'll have a huge hole in your group. You'll also be trying to find a way to make things go back to how they were and recapture that magic, it won't happen. Don't get discouraged.

You have to include any possible new active people in your "core" as soon as possible. Then you intentionally leave them the room to operate. Creating a culture that passes on this model of passing on responsibilities and power is the single hardest thing. Create traditions. Create expectation that some thing _must_ be done (one of these should be finding a new "core" to keep on going). If you don't do that the group will die. Other option is to not care about it, and just do as you feel like. If the group dies when you leave then it dies. The people coming after yuo can then find their own groups or whatever.

Exactly, my standpoint was that ACM is a professional group and should live on, without having to be resurrected every few years. But cores are important and will be replaced, it's just that while you're a part of the core, and everyone else leaves you will feel like you're the only one who cares and it will get very discouraging to the point where you'll think "what's the point?" If it dies after HE leaves, no big deal, if it dies while he's still there, it can be disheartening.

Comment: Re:I was an ACM President, here is my advice (Score 1) 66

by Angrywhiteshoes (#43897067) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To Start and Manage a University LUG?

I know for sure Google, Fedora and Microsoft (I know... but it has perks for the club) have ambassador programs and will provide funding and raffle prizes that can be used for fundraising to keep the club going.

It may be my lack of Google skills, but I can't find any evidence of a Red Hat corporate presence in Ghana. (and both surprised and slightly disappointed to find very few pictures of Ghaneans wearing fedoras instead but I digress...)

I will bite on this.

Something I found in the past is, if there is no presence where you live, contact the company and create the presence there. They will often work with you for loads of promotion that will cost them almost nothing.

Ambassador Programs
http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Ambassadors
http://www.google.com/intl/en/jobs/students/proscho/programs/uscanada/ambassador/ (find your region)
http://www.microsoft.com/de-ch/students/en/getInTouch/MicrosoftOnCampus/Ambassadors/default.aspx#fbid=6Weg8o4CBmr
http://www.apple.com/education/campusreps/

Don't forget to contact other major distros and see if they have anything similar or would donate some shirts, dvds, usbs, keychains or ANYTHING to your group to help promote Linux.

Sign your team up for Dreamspark and get Microsoft OSs running as VMs on top of linux so you can know about the issues involved with running MS services in VMs. They also have something like "Microsoft Services for Unix." It's always good to know your "enemy."

Comment: I was an ACM President, here is my advice (Score 5, Informative) 66

by Angrywhiteshoes (#43893553) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To Start and Manage a University LUG?
This is my experience, I know your club will be slightly more topic focused than an ACM club but these are some issues I had as a leader and member of several computing clubs in my time. I hope it helps.

Scheduling
You have to find a balance in your schedules. One of the main things clubs will suffer from is either having too many meetings and not having enough content to fill them up or having not enough meetings and people forgetting about it, either way, you will lose members because of these two things. This is not just ACM but in the hackerspace I attend in my town that had "organized meetings" that ended up being nothing and sometimes just me sitting there alone wondering if anyone was going to show up for the talk on the calendar, and even the speaker doesn't show up.

Don't get discouraged
You're going to have people showing up looking for answers to homework problems or with general class problems and are looking for some magical device to help them pass their courses. You will also have people showing up looking for free refreshments. You will get people who think joining your club is going to somehow lead to an internship somewhere or that you'll help them in their career. They will all eventually stop coming, you must not take it personal and keep going.

Content
Keep your content on track and don't write checks you can't cash. Working in a group where people are bogged down by coursework already and have little to no time to commit will often bullshit with you and say they're up for a task then not deliver when it matters. So what I mean by this is don't promise anything to the group or outside groups (we had a president do this before and it made us look bad), don't promise help with web pages or anything like that. These things happen like "hey can you help me with [thing]?" then you feeling like a good chance for outreach are like "sure" and you're in trouble and looking like a total jackass now.

Make sure you can get guest speakers to come and talk about something related to projects you're working on. It will be exciting to hear about how maybe someone implements [thing] in the real world and what to look out for when doing real world implementations. You can learn a lot about things like hardening servers and so on by asking a working engineer about dos-and-don'ts in the work force.

Keeping content on track can be hard, you start forgetting what the point of the club is as it turns into a more social event (which isn't bad) but you will lose members and focus very easily and eventually your club will die. So maybe set aside social time after the main meeting content is done, this will allow people to mingle and get some good technical information from your meetings.

Your core will eventually disappear
College is a revolving door and the 5 core members who really tied the group together will graduate and you will be left with people who don't care as much. I saw this happen to ACM while I was at my school before I got involved with some friends forming the "new core," then we graduated and my dept chair emailed me saying "ACM is now dead." So you need to ALWAYS be advertising and finding people who are interested, or you'll have a huge hole in your group. You'll also be trying to find a way to make things go back to how they were and recapture that magic, it won't happen. Don't get discouraged.

Leadership
You are just some guy who likes linux. People are going to look to you as a leader and expect you to have answers. Don't bullshit. My first experience at ACM involved a "Linux seminar" where the president was giving the talk. He didn't know anything about linux. He somehow became the Fedora ambassador at the school (probably because no one else knew about the position) so he decided to try to get us all to install fedora and was trying to show us how to configure it. He never used linux before. He made a real ass of himself and a few friends of mine and myself ended up finishing the talk for him from the audience by taking over the A part of the Q&A that erupted. Long story short, if you don't know, don't pretend. That meeting I described really killed the clubs image to the CS department students.

Ambassadors
Take ownership of these positions in the school if you can and throw release parties. You can often get the parent company to sponsor the event. I know for sure Google, Fedora and Microsoft (I know... but it has perks for the club) have ambassador programs and will provide funding and raffle prizes that can be used for fundraising to keep the club going.

Pressure
Do not pressure your new members to wipe out their existing Windows OS for linux, they will be fearful of this. They are curious and want to learn, but still want to play League of Legends and whatever. The best thing I found was using virtualbox to install VMs that they can mess around in. You will gain new members a lot easier if you have a "noob meeting" where you do an intro to setting up a VM and getting them going with linux and easing them in. Then, they will become very active members.

Also, at times you will feel some pressure. Drink a beer and play some league of legends, it's not worth worrying about, it should be fun.

Comment: Re:National ID Requirement For Registration (Score 1) 559

by Angrywhiteshoes (#43852723) Attached to: Criminal Complaint Filed Against Facebook After Girl's Death
They should just setup booths in 7-11s where the clerk can sign you up for facebook when you buy a slurpee.

Side note: I'm not sure about the allure of a website that is an ultra watered down form of social interaction which is 99% self-shot photos and posting really old memes that they just found out about.

Comment: I still play my NES (Score 1) 335

by Angrywhiteshoes (#43822859) Attached to: Can the Wii U Survive Against the PS4 and Xbox One?
I still have an NES, SNES, N64 and Gamecube. I have owned PS2, Xbox, Xbox360 but not anymore. Could there be a particular reason why I keep my Nintendo systems and not my Sony or Microsoft systems? Yes, the games on the PS2, Xbox, Xbox360 are not fun, they will never be "classic" aside from maybe Halo (in my opinion). No one is going to look back and be like "Man, MW2-Extra FPS rage edition was a classic, I want to play that until I die." But they will continue to play Super Mario Bros iterations and The Legend of Zelda saga. That's just half of my 2 cents because I just woke up and saw people semi-flaming my favorite console company of all time. Sorry they don't put out gorey FPS and overly sexy games.

Would you people stop playing these stupid games?!?!?!!!!

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