Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Note: You can take 10% off all Slashdot Deals with coupon code "slashdot10off." ×

Submission + - Real Ghost Story: The People I See->

An anonymous reader writes: Ever since I was ten I have noticed weird things that a normal 10 year old would not notice or see. I was ten when I saw my first spirit. I was visiting my grandmother for the summer, my first summer away from my family.

It was a couple weeks, and one night something weird happened. It was about 10:30 when I went to bed, my grandmother went to go to bed and she always closes my door. I went to sleep in the guest room, around 11 she went to sleep. About at midnight I was sleeping and I got a sense I was being watched. I open my eyes and there was a older gentleman about his late 70’s and, he was wearing a suit like 1800’s clothing nothing like what people were wearing, now this was in 2005 in Astoria, Oregon. I looked at for few seconds. He was standing in my doorway looking down the hall at my grandmothers room. He told me to watch my grandmother she was in danger. I got scared, knew it wasn’t a evil spirit it had a calm sense like he knew her, but I got scared, what 10 year old wouldn’t be scared.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - In Praise of the Solo Programmer

HughPickens.com writes: Jean-Louis Gassée writes that once upon a time, we were awestruck by the solo programmer who could single-handedly write a magnum opus on a barebones machine like the Apple ][ with its 64 kilobytes of memory and an 8-bit processor running at 1MHz. Once such giant was Paul Lutus, known as the Oregon Hermit, who won a place next to Jobs and Wozniak in the Bandley Drive Hall of Fame for his Apple Writer word processor. "Those were the days Computers and their operating systems were simple and the P in Personal Computers applied to the programmer," writes Gassée. "There’s no place for a 2015 Paul Lutus. But are things really that dire?"

As it turns out, the size and complexity of operating systems and development tools do not pose completely insurmountable obstacles; There are still programs of hefty import authored by one person. One such example is Preview, Mac’s all-in-one file viewing and editing program. The many superpowers of Apple’s Preview does justice to the app’s power and flexibility authored by a solo, unnamed programmer who has been at it since the NeXT days. Newer than Preview but no less ambitious, is Gus Mueller’s Acorn, an “Image Editor for Humans”, now in version 5 at the Mac App Store. Mueller calls his Everett, WA company a mom and pop shop because his spouse Kristin does the documentation when she isn’t working as a Physical Therapist. Gus recently released Acorn 5 fixing hundreds of minor bugs and annoyances. "It took months and months of work, it was super boring and mind numbing and it was really hard to justify, and it made Acorn 5 super late," writes Mueller. "But we did it anyway, because something in us felt that software quality has been going downhill in general, and we sure as heck weren't going to let that happen to Acorn."

Submission + - Ins0mnia Flaw Let Dangerous iOS Apps Run In Background 'Indefinitely'

Mickeycaskill writes: Researchers at FireEye discovered a “rare” loophole in iOS that could have allowed attackers to distribute malware through the App Store.

‘Ins0mnia’ allowed a potentially malicious application to run permanently in the background, accessing data and performing other tasks, even if a user closed the app and it was no longer visible in the task switcher.

iPhone and iPad apps can only run in the background for roughly three minutes before the application is terminated by iOS. This safeguard allows apps with legitimate permission to access functions to perform tasks, while preventing others from eavesdropping.

However Ins0mnia tricked iOS into believing the device was being debugged, meaning the time limit never expired. A piece of malware could have stolen information and sent it to a remote server without a user’s knowledge – not only compromising privacy, but harming performance and draining battery life.

Apple patched the vulnerability in iOS 8.4.1

Submission + - After five years, is Openstack ready?

Mickeycaskill writes: OpenStack is five years old this month, but is it ready for the mainstream?

The cloud platform, originally developed by NASA, is now viewed as a viable platform by many — not least Walmart and the NSA. It has been deemed a non-profit organisation by the IRS and is viewed by many as a democratizing technology.

At OpenStack Silicon Valley 2015, it's biggest conference yet, its 25,000 members across 167 countries, including Google and Intel and analysts debate whether Openstack is now ready for the big time.

Submission + - Many Drivers Never Use In-Vehicle Tech, Don't Want Apple Or Google In Next Car->

Lucas123 writes: Many of the high-tech features automakers believe owners want in their vehicles are not only not being used by them, but they don't want them in their next vehicle, according to a new survey by J.D. Power. According to J.D. Power's 2015 Driver Interactive Vehicle Experience (DrIVE) Report, 20% of new-vehicle owners have never used 16 of 33 of the latest technology features. The five features owners most commonly report that they "never use" are in-vehicle concierge (43%); mobile routers (38%); automatic parking systems (35%); heads-up display (33%); and built-in apps (32%). Additionally, there are 14 technology features that 20% or more of owners don't even want in their next vehicle. Those features include Apple CarPlay and Google Android Auto, in-vehicle concierge services and in-vehicle voice texting. When narrowed to just Gen Yers, the number of vehicle owners who don't want entertainment and connectivity systems increases to 23%.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant opens in Hawaii

AmiMoJo writes: There's a big difference between the warm, shallow seawater lapping up against a beach and the icy depths of the ocean. Now, researchers are turning that temperature difference into energy at energy plants all over the world. The newest one opened up in Hawaii last Friday, where it expects to generate around 105kW constantly. OTEC plants operate 24/7, are suitable for base load, and are dispatchable, meaning they can vary their output according to demand. The pilot plant is the largest in the world, with Makai, the developer, signed up to deliver a 1MW plant to the Japanese island of Kyushu and develop a 100MW plant with Lockheed Martin.

Submission + - Giant Data Center Stacks Kit In Underground 'City'->

An anonymous reader writes: Lefdal Mine is building Europe's biggest data center with up to a million square feet of space in a maze of underground passages in a Norwegian mountain. IT kit in shipping containers will be stacked along underground "streets" (or three traditional data centers) in the former mine. It will be cooled with seawater from the fjord alongside, and powered by hydroelectric energy. IBM is the anchor tenant with a lease to deliver disaster recovery services from the site
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Deep Learning Pioneer on the Next Generation of Hardware for Neural Networks->

An anonymous reader writes: While many recognize Yann LeCun as the father of convolutional neural networks, the momentum of which has ignited artificial intelligence at companies like Google, Facebook, and beyond, LeCun has not been strictly rooted in algorithms. Like others who have developed completely new approaches to computing, he has an extensive background in hardware, specifically, chip design, and this recognition of specialization of hardware, movement of data around complex problems, and ultimately, core performance, has proven handy.

He talks in depth this week about why FPGAs are coming onto the scene as companies like Google and Facebook seek a move away from "proprietary hardware" and look to "programmable devices" to do things like, oh, say, pick out a single face of one's choosing from an 800,000 strong population in under five seconds.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - 3D-printed microfish– capable of removing and sensing toxins->

jan_jes writes: Researchers developed a multipurpose fish-shaped microrobots — called microfish — that swim around efficiently in liquids, are chemically powered by hydrogen peroxide and magnetically controlled. These proof-of-concept synthetic microfish will inspire a new generation of “smart” microrobots that have diverse capabilities such as detoxification, sensing and directed drug delivery. The technique used to fabricate the microfish provides numerous improvements over other methods traditionally employed to create microrobots with various locomotion mechanisms, such as microjet engines, microdrillers and microrockets.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Inside the booming, unhinged, and dangerous malvertising menace->

mask.of.sanity writes: A feature on the online malicious advertising (malvertising) menace that has become an explosively potent threat to end-user security on the internet. Experts say advertising networks and exchanges need to vet their customers, and publishers need to vet the third party content they display. Users should also consider script and ad blockers in the interim.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - You Can Now Be "Buried" On The Moon

Dave Knott writes: Space burials are longer the stuff of science fiction (and wealthy science fiction TV show creators.) The cremated remains of more than 450 people have been shot into orbit. Yet, despite the promise of space being a unique "resting place," almost every tiny vial of remains ever sent there has come back down to Earth or burned up upon re-entry. This wouldn't have happened had the ashes landed on Earth's moon — a fact that hasn't been lost on the companies pioneering this futuristic funeral technology. The San Francisco-based company Elysium Space officially launched its 'lunar memorial' service earlier this month, and will soon be sending the remains of a U.S. Army Infantry Soldier's mother upwards as part of its first ever moon burial.

The company's website further explains how the lunar burials will work:
"You receive a kit containing a custom ash capsule to collect a cremated remains sample. After we receive the ash capsule back from you, we place your capsule in the Elysium memorial spacecraft. The latter is eventually integrated to the Astrobotic lander during the designated integration event. From here, the lander is integrated onto the launch vehicle. On launch day, the remains are carried to the moon where the lander will be deployed to its dedicated location, preserving our memorial spacecraft for eternity."

Because Elysium can only send a small portion of cremated remains to the moon (less than a gram), participants aren't actually paying to have their loved ones literally buried on the moon. However, this has not deterred the company from launching the service, charging $11,950 per "burial".

Submission + - Rovio Prepares for Another Round of Staff Lay-offs->

on4play writes: Angry Birds developer Rovio has announced that it is to lay-off an additional 260 staff. This follows the company letting go of 110 staff late last year.

This latest round of lay-offs affects an estimated 38% of the company's remaining workforce (last year's lay-offs accounted for 16% of the total workforce at the time), so it represents a considerable reduction in staff numbers.



"Fundamental changes are needed to ensure Rovio succeeds in its global ambitions to be the leading entertainment company with mobile games at its heart," said studio boss Pekka Rantala.

"This is personally a difficult decision. However, it is certain that a leaner and more agile Rovio is absolutely necessary to move forward and take the company to new successes in the future."

Full Article — http://www.vgchartz.com/article/260704/rovio-prepares-for-another-round-of-staff-lay-offs/

Link to Original Source

Submission + - The Nations That Will Be Hardest Hit by Water Shortages by 2040

merbs writes: Water access is going to be one of the most pressing issues of the 21st century. As climate change dries out the already dry areas and makes the wet ones wetter, we’re poised to see some radical civilizational shifts. For one, a number of densely populated areas will come under serious water stress—which analysts fear will lead to strife, thirst, and even violent conflict. With that in mind, the World Resource Institute has assembled a new report projecting which nations are most likely to be hardest hit by water stress in coming decades—nations like Bahrain, Israel, Palestine, and Spain lead the pack.

Submission + - How To Keep Microsoft's Nose Out Of Your Personal Data In Windows 10->

MojoKid writes: Amid the privacy concerns and arguably invasive nature of Microsoft's Windows 10 regarding user information, it's no surprise that details on how to minimize leaks as much as possible are often requested by users who have recently made the jump to the new operating system. If you are using Windows 10, or plan to upgrade soon, it's worth bearing in mind a number of privacy-related options that are available, even during the installation/upgrade. If you are already running the OS and forgot to turn them off during installation (or didn't even see them), they can be accessed via the Settings menu on the start menu, and then selecting Privacy from the pop-up menu. Among these menus are a plethora of options regarding what data can be gathered about you. It's worth noting, however, that changing any of these options may disable various OS related services, namely Cortana, as Microsoft's digital assistant has it tendrils buried deep.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - British idea for a suborbital flight might have started a space program in 195-> 1

MarkWhittington writes: The BBC reported on a hitherto little-known proposal in the early 1950s to use a modified V2 rocket to put a Briton into space in a suborbital flight similar to that taken by American astronauts Alan Shepard and Gus Grissom a decade later, The thing could have been done technically. Unfortunately, Great Britain’s economy was all but ruined by the Second World War. What government funding that was available was being used for aviation and nuclear technology development. Britain was also in the process of creating a welfare state, which left little for a space program.
Link to Original Source

If all else fails, immortality can always be assured by spectacular error. -- John Kenneth Galbraith

Working...