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Comment: Re:Of course. (Score 1) 1174

by Anemophilous Coward (#39807405) Attached to: TSA Defends Pat Down of 4-Year-Old Girl

Then there is this brilliant new policy from the TSA:

The statement noted that the agency recently implemented modified screening procedures for children age 12 and younger to further reduce the need for pat-downs of children, such as multiple passes through a metal detector and advanced imaging technology.

I know the results are still not 100% conclusive, but *multiple* passes through the "advanced imaging technology" means more potential x-rays or backscatter radiation applied to our children. So that is how this security theatre works - radiate enough of the population at very young ages so that they develop medical problems sooner and either die or become incapable of physical action later in life.

Comment: Re:Augmented reality (Score 1) 173

by Anemophilous Coward (#28992313) Attached to: Mind-Blowing Interfaces On Display At SIGGRAPH 2009

I believe I read a paper by Mann that didn't use gaze tracking per se, but rather a camera mounted on the headwear itself would be used to recognize people and places. The camera would be effectively in the middle of the glasses you wore, so it captured a fairly wide angle of vision in front of you. The whole apparatus was programmed such that you could store images of people or objects in a database and access them wirelessly.

The whole point wasn't that you had to rely on you gaze anymore - the camera was always on and seeing everything in its field of view. If something or someone came into its view and the software successfully completed a pattern match, then the heads up display would display a note showing the object (e.g. putting a persons name above their head). In this sense, you could be focused on something else and the computer finds an object for you and brings it to your attention. You could look towards a large crowd of people and the computer would find your friends in there before you could. This could be expanded by adding additional cameras/sensors around your head, giving you eyes in the back of your head. A new sense if you will, augmenting your existing ones. Cool stuff for sure.

Software

How To Kill an Open Source Project With New Funding 187

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the money-still-the-root-of-all-evil dept.
mir42 writes "The OpenSource multimedia authorware project Sophie, formerly hosted by USC Los Angeles, may just have been killed by new funding. The original funding organization, Mellon Foundation, approved a grant to redevelop the four year project from scratch in Java. The grant was awarded to a Bulgarian company based on their proposal, which is simply an exact description, including the UI and the artwork, of the current Sophie. Being an OpenSource project, this isn't strictly illegal, but let's say, not nice and definitely not innovative, coming from a former sub-sub-contractor on the project. Some of the original, now laid-off developers started OpenSophie.org trying to salvage the project. As the current version is still somewhat buggy and slow, it might just be enough to alienate all potential users of Sophie to the point that nobody will even try to use the next version. Have others faced similar situations? How would you deal with a situation like this?"
Google

+ - Custom Time: Gmail's new email feature

Submitted by Anemophilous Coward
Anemophilous Coward (312040) writes "Wow, what a great new Gmail feature, you now are able to backdate your email you send to people. That way it will chronologically appear in the correct place you want it to within their inbox. You even have the option to have it marked as read already. Even more reason to make use of the wonder that is Gmail. Plenty of great testimonies to its usage and explanations into how the technology works can be found at the link above."
Wii

+ - WiiMote used to control MS Virtual Earth 3D

Submitted by Anemophilous Coward
Anemophilous Coward (312040) writes "Someone has developed yet another fun use for the WiiMote. From the Intro: Virtual Earth is the 3D interface to Microsoft's Live Maps service. Normally this control is loaded via the web browser and allows interaction with a keyboard, mouse, and Xbox 360 controller. In this article, we will take the Virtual Earth control out of the web browser, use it in a WinForms application, and control it with a Nintendo Wii Remote (Wiimote) There is an included video link as well showing the work in action. An older article from last October, but still quite cool."
Networking

+ - How do slashdotters manage email on their laptops?

Submitted by
dotancohen
dotancohen writes "I'll soon be getting a new Dell laptop that'll be running Fedora Core 5 or 6. I need to access the email stored on my home box from the laptop, and also to read new email sent to me while I'm not home (and the home box is shut down). If I run an IMAP server at home, then I can't read the mail when the home box is down. But if I pull from the POP3 server (and leave the mail on the server) then I won't be able to sort and file the mail while on the go. Is there anyway to sync the mail accounts between two linux boxen, assuming that I'm using the same mail client? I currently use Kmail, but I might switch to Eudora in April/March when it becomes available for Linux.

Thanks in advance."
Media (Apple)

+ - iTunes Visits Skyrocket 413% On Christmas Day

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Hitwise today announced that the market share of visits to the iTunes website was up 413 percent on Christmas Day 2006 (December 25, 2006) versus Christmas Day 2005 as new iPod owners flocked to the web to download iTunes. The market share of visits to Zune.net showed an increase of 1,030 percent on December 25, 2006 versus the previous Monday (December 18, 2006). However, this strong initial performance was overshadowed by the iPod."
Programming

+ - Build Ajax into your Web apps with Rails

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Ruby on Rails provides an excellent platform for building Web applications. Discover how to use the built-in Asynchronous JavaScript(TM) + XML (Ajax) features of the platform to give your application the Web 2.0 rich user interface experience. Even if you don't envision yourself shipping a Rails application, I recommend that you download one of the Instant Rails or Locomotive applications and try it out."
Books

+ - Can you tell a story in shellscript?

Submitted by Anonymous Cowboy
Anonymous Cowboy (666) writes "Maddox Kent has written a novel called Living Things, published via Bob Young's post-Red Hat venture Lulu.com — and a whole chapter is written in a script language inspired, according to the author, by the bash shell. A significant portion of the novel takes place in an MMO, and there's even reference to a "GTA-Persistent" thirty-odd years from now... Ender's Game arguably made videogames into a literary device: are there any other novels (bar the Halo/Splinter Cell spinoffs) that feature games as a significant factor? If cinema can grasp gaming as a storytelling device (The Last Starfighter, Tron, even Hackers at a pinch) why is it still so rare in literature? We are always badgering gamemakers to tell better stories: Tom Clancy aside, who outside the industry is willing to engage with games as a storytelling medium?"

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