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Officials Sue Couple Who Removed Their Lawn 819

Hugh Pickens writes "The LA Times reports that Orange County officials are locked in a legal battle with a couple accused of violating city ordinances for replacing the grass on their lawn with wood chips and drought-tolerant plants, reducing their water usage from 299,221 gallons in 2007 to 58,348 gallons in 2009. The dispute began two years ago, when Quan and Angelina Ha tore out the grass in their front yard. In drought-plagued Southern California, the couple said, the lush grass had been soaking up tens of thousands of gallons of water — and hundreds of dollars — each year. 'We've got a newborn, so we want to start worrying about her future,' said Quan Ha, an information technology manager for Kelley Blue Book. But city officials told the Has they were violating several city laws that require that 40% of residential yards to be landscaped predominantly with live plants. Last summer, the couple tried to appease the city by building a fence around the yard and planting drought-tolerant greenery — lavender, rosemary, horsetail, and pittosporum, among others. But according to the city, their landscaping still did not comply with city standards. At the end of January, the Has received a letter saying they had been charged with a misdemeanor violation and must appear in court. The couple could face a maximum penalty of six months in jail and a $1,000 fine for their grass-free, eco-friendly landscaping scheme. 'It's just funny that we pay our taxes to the city and the city is now prosecuting us with our own money,' says Quan Ha."

Submission + - OpenBSD lack of security (fsdaily.com)

An anonymous reader writes: FSDaily has an interesting opinion piece on OpenBSD. OpenBSD long believed to be one of the most secure operating systems is scrutinized for their security practicies including the strlcpy library calls, there only considering remote code exection to be vulnerabilities and most of all their complete rejection of any extended access control. It is a very interesting article with an interesting comparison to the Linux approach to security, and rasies good questions as to which one is truly better. In the end I think both are needed, and both projects could learn from each other.

Submission + - The (Involuntary) Unification of Linux (lunduke.com) 1

jbChrisLAS writes: A look back over the last few years of Desktop Linux usage shows stunning trends that would seem to indicate a process of natural selection for desktop Linux, one that's leading to a unified Linux Desktop.

"People should have access to the data which you have about them. There should be a process for them to challenge any inaccuracies." -- Arthur Miller