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Submission + - The Future of Farming (

eldavojohn writes: With hunger being a major problem in the world, PopSci offers eight innovations in farming that are currently being tested and implemented. They are: farming the desert, soil sensors to cut fertilizer/water waste, genetically engineering rice, using nitrogen collecting microbes in place of fertilizer, gathering extensive data on land to improve usage, robot labor, biochar (nutrients for plants while sequestering carbon) and supercrops like a super resistant, super nutritious bioengineered cassava (also known as yucca). While some of the estimates on these things are five or six years into the future, many are already in place and available.

Submission + - Facebook, Twitter DDOS Linked To Georgian Blogger ( 1

hardsix writes: "Facebook has has confirmed that it also suffered a DDOS attack on Thursday and has pointed the finger at the account of one Georgian blogger — known as Cyxymu — who appears have been the target of the denial of service attack. "It was a simultaneous attack across a number of properties targeting him to keep his voice from being heard," said Max Kelly, chief security officer at Facebook. Security researchers have pointed out that the attack appears to conicide with the anniversary of the escalation of the conflict between Russia and Georgia last year in South Ossetia. But also pointed out how fragile Twitter appears to be if an attack on one user could bring it down. "This raises the astonishing thought that a vendetta against a single user caused Twitter to crumble, forcing us to ask serious questions about the site's fragility," said Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant at security software specialist Sophos."
The Internet

Submission + - The Real Difference Between Cheap and Free 1

An anonymous reader writes: The Times is reporting on an interesting spat between Malcolm Gladwell, author of The "Tipping Point", "Blink" and "Outliers", and Chris Anderson, Wired contributor and author of The Long Tail: Why The Future of Business is Selling Less of More.

The source of conflict is a fascinating review of Anderson's book by Gladwell in the New Yorker, in which Gladwell addresses Anderson's argument that technology applies an inexorable downward pressure on the price of intellectual, property. Regardless of whose position you agree with, the debate is an interesting one, even though I've yet to see an answer to the question that if it really is a race to the bottom, what happens to society once we get there?

Submission + - Stem cells now extracted from fallopian tubes (

Andr T. writes: "The Journal of Translational Medicine published today an article written by Brazilian scientists claiming they were able to fully develop stem cells from human fallopian tubes:

The possibility of using stem cells for regenerative medicine has opened a new field of investigation. The search for sources to obtain multipotent stem cells from discarded tissues or through non-invasive procedures is of great interest. It has been shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) obtained from umbilical cords, dental pulp and adipose tissue, which are all biological discards, are able to differentiate into muscle, fat, bone and cartilage cell lineages. The aim of this study was to isolate, expand, characterize and assess the differentiation potential of MSCs from human fallopian tubes (hFTs).

Does this mean we could have stem cell research without ethical problems? It has already been shown that stem cells can be extracted from ubilical cords, dental pulps and adipose tissue as well.""


Oklahoma Ambulances Debut Sirens That You Can Feel Screenshot-sm 128

djupedal writes "Booming like a 1980s video game, the Howler can even make liquids ripple — Oklahoma's largest ambulance company will become the first ambulance service in the nation to outfit its entire fleet with new Howler sirens, designed to emit low-frequency tones that penetrate objects within 200 feet — such as cars — to alert drivers." This is all well and fine, but I wonder what they plan to do when their sirens call up one of the big worms from deep below?

Submission + - Time Machines Can Break Quantum Cryptography (

An anonymous reader writes: Quantum physics offers James Bond and his ilk much more than a bit of solace--it permits quantum encryption, a completely spyproof way to send coded information. Eavesdropping by a third party can always be detected. But now physicists have suggested that quantum codes may be breakable. The feat involves a trick that even Bond hasn't mastered yet — time travel. By taking advantage of hidden paths to the past — routes that are predicted by some of Einstein's equations — a nemesis could eavesdrop on a quantum-coded message without being detected.

All Finagle Laws may be bypassed by learning the simple art of doing without thinking.