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Comment: Re: And in other news... (Score 2) 506

by Anarchy24 (#46359533) Attached to: Quebec Language Police Target Store Owner's Facebook Page
I'm a first-generation Quebecois in America (ugh!) and my French = NULL. I studied it some on my own as a kid and took it for 5 years in school. I also studied Latin for 2 years, and German and Chinese for 1. I tried, I really did.
I can't speak a single damn one of them and can barely read a tourist map.
I studied linguistics for 2 years and was very good at it, but it simply feels impossible to learn another language. The amount of rote memorization, unusual grammar, and idioms makes the task seem insurmountable; I'm done trying. I guess I'm just lazy.

A joke they told in my language classes was that a person who spoke three languages was trilingual, a person who spoke two was bilingual, and a person who spoke one was an American. Without having exposure to many different languages at an early age - not just exposure but living amongst them - Americans are pretty much doomed when it comes to learning a second language. Before the age of 4 children can acquire just about any language with ease, and this decreases until the age of 11 or 12 or so - after that, its really really hard to learn another.

It sucks living in New York City and feeling like I'm the only person who doesn't speak another language, but that's just life. At least I speak only English and not only French.

Comment: Re:Programming as a vocation! (Score 1) 491

by Anarchy24 (#46348063) Attached to: Do We Really Have a Shortage of STEM Workers?
I'd love to have your big corporate budget, but I don't.
I'd love to have your department full of programmers, but I don't.
I'd love to have your nice long deadlines, but I don't.
I'd love to have a professional development budget - hell, **I** want some professional development!

I don't have the time to train someone. When I have 100 resumes to flip through, and 20% look even remotely qualified, shouldn't I be able to find at least ONE programmer who knows wtf they're doing?? If I don't hire someone, I end up doing the project myself, working with technology that I don't know. If I can do it, why can't someone else?! Do your damn job - you learn by NEEDING to learn something new to get the job done, and by DOING it. I'm not going to "train" you by doing the job for you.

Comment: Re:Programming as a vocation! (Score 1) 491

by Anarchy24 (#46347359) Attached to: Do We Really Have a Shortage of STEM Workers?
I am a systems engineer/project manager in the software dev institute of a major research university - I don't expect to hire an out-of-the-box worker, and I want the project to be just as much a learning experience for them as it is a paid job, by giving them the opportunity to analyze and propose their own solutions under my leadership/guidance. If there is a particular technology they want to learn and that I agree is a good tool for the job, then by all means I encourage them to use it. I need them to be interested enough and self-motivated enough to learn the skills they need to get the job done. Otherwise it'll just be me reading the manual and telling them how to do the job; in that situation, it's easier for me to do it myself.

When hiring, my three basic criteria are: are you smart, are you motivated, and have you done any projects on your own time (which speaks to the previous two). It's usually easy to tell if they're fluffing a skill or not because if they have actual experience, they are specific about which technologies they've used. A candidate who puts "Linux" isn't the same as one who lists "Debian"

Comment: Re:Programming as a vocation! (Score 1) 491

by Anarchy24 (#46346845) Attached to: Do We Really Have a Shortage of STEM Workers?
Compsci has basically nothing to do with computers, and that's half the problem. Students think that when they take up computer science, they'll be studying, you know, actual technology. It is far more useful to an employer (me) that a worker can write SQL (3rd year DB students with +90% GPAs who cant GROUP a query?!), not just use some query-building IDE software for a class project that does the heavy-lifting for them. I need someone who can intersect and transform arrays - they can't even do that. The crap I did at the age of 15, these college students have never even seen before! I don't expect them to have that experience, but comon, if you want to work in this field you gotta know SOMETHING outside the classroom!

This is why I can't find qualified students. If I need someone to sniff a network, it's far more useful to me that they know how to use a damn sniffer than for them to know the OSI model but can't make heads or tails of a packet payload. Is the OSI model useful? Sure. Does it get the job done? Not at all.

Comment: Programming as a vocation! (Score 5, Interesting) 491

by Anarchy24 (#46344993) Attached to: Do We Really Have a Shortage of STEM Workers?
Colleges teach high-level theories and models and UMLs and chess board Java CS projects - useless to 99.9% of tech employers. So many compsci students I see come into class half-asleep, barely pay attention in class, and don't seem to think much about it once they leave the classroom. They think they're going to make a ton of money as .NET developers by using drag-and-drop software like Visual Studio. I am looking to hire 3 student programmers right now, and even amongst our best candidates, they can't write a simple 4-line script to output a file to screen. They are very, very smart students, but they don't have any skills! Employers need workers with practical experience, and in general WANT workers who have lots of experience with specific software. Colleges don't teach software suites, they teach theories. Programming and information technology should be taught as vocations... high-paying, of course.

Comment: Mark sees a future without Facebook (Score 1) 199

by Anarchy24 (#46291033) Attached to: Facebook To Buy WhatsApp
Younger people ( say 35 ) have been fleeing Facebook in droves, because it's been around a while, and not "cool" when your PARENTS have joined, friended you, friended your friends, and then gossip more to you about what they're doing than you know yourself. Because they're old and have no life. I deal with this every day. Needless to say, Mark is keeping 'Whatsapp' separate because he knows that Facebook will be toast within the next 10 years and he doesn't want to drag this investment down by attaching it to an ailing brand. Wise move.
Television

US Cord Cutters Getting Snubbed From NBC's Olympic Coverage Online 578

Posted by Soulskill
from the all-about-the-benjamins dept.
Monoman writes "The Washington Post reports, 'The 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics start tonight. But if you're among the 9 percent of U.S. households who have broadband but don't subscribe to paid television, it will be nearly impossible to (legally) watch the games online this year. ... That's because while NBC is streaming all of the events live online, full access to the livestream will only be available to paying cable subscribers. And thanks to a $4.38 billion exclusive deal NBC struck with the International Olympics Committee (IOC) in 2011 for the privilege of broadcasting the Olympic games in the U.S. through 2020, cord-cutters don't have a lot of options.' Is this a money play by Comcast/NBC to get some subscribers back? Should the FCC step in and require NBC to at least provide a stream of their OTA content?"

Comment: Re:Gah-bage! (Score 1) 396

by Anarchy24 (#44893293) Attached to: <em>GTA V</em> Makes $800 Million In 24 Hours
Pacman is boring and repetative. I was tired of it 20 years ago, and even the nostalgia of playing it on a full-sized console wears off after feeding it quarters. It's boring. Ladybug was cool though. And at least Donkey Kong and Frogger took skill. I'd take the old Street Fighter or Mortal Kombat over any GTA, any day.

"Stupidity, like virtue, is its own reward" -- William E. Davidsen

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