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Comment: Re:So many reasons not too... (Score 1) 157

by Anaerin (#46750359) Attached to: Will This Flying Car Get Crowdfunded?

3) More like a helicopter than an aeroplane? Nope. Airplanes are MUCH easier to fly than a helicopter; the average person cannot do this.

Perhaps they're thinking of a Gyrocopter (or Autogyro). That has the advantage of small size (No need for large fixed wings) without the complication of dealing with a collective stick system.

Personally, I was always interested in the "Land Shark" project (Archive.org link, as the original has since disappeared). The idea was to have a tadpole-style trike that, when on water, would use it's turbine-shaped rear wheel hub to propel it as it hydroplaned on the front wheel's lowered mudguards. Simple, and effective, but unfortunately it never got off the ground. A shame, really.

Comment: Re:They talk very big (Score 4, Informative) 62

Okay, here's the deal. You want a phone, so you buy a base unit (that probably has the screen). Once you've done that, you choose what CPU (Single-core? Dual-core? Quad-core? Octa-core?) you want, how much RAM (512MB? 1GB? 2GB?), how much storage (16GB? 32GB? 64GB?), what kind of camera (None, 2MP, 4MP, 16MP with telescopic zoom lens?), Location system (Cell Tower Only? A-GPS? GLONASS + GPS + Compass?), Radios (Bluetooth? Wifi (a? n?), cellular radio (None? CDMA? GSM/Edge? UMTS? LTE?), card reader, and battery you want.

Want to update at a later time? Not a problem! Swap out that tired old dual-core ARMv7 for the latest dohexa-core 64-bit ARMv11! Running out of RAM too often? Throw another 2GB in there. Find you're taking more pictures than you thought? Swap out the basic 4MP shooter for a 28MP beast! Want to do work with 3D mapping? Add a second camera!

The idea is to make phones as modular as (or even more so than) a home PC.

Comment: Issues, and fixes (Score 1) 2219

by Anaerin (#46181687) Attached to: Slashdot Tries Something New; Audience Responds!

Speaking purely from a look perspective, there are a mess of problems.

  • Huge amounts of whitespace on either side. This is 2014, and there are a million tutorials on how to make a fluid design.
  • Complete lack of contrast. I have no problem with the text contrast, but there's so little difference between comments, and between stories, no delineation or separation.
  • Basic problems - Some fonts in the CSS are defined as "Helvetica sans-serif". There needs to be a comma in there, Chris!
  • In slashdot comments, there are 3 levels of display: Open, summarized and hidden. In the new beta, there are again 3 options: Open, closed and hidden. "Closed" is not as versatile as "summarized".
  • Using JQuery to get the comments I have little-to-no problem with. But slashdot's main point is the long list of comments. The current AJAX system is limiting, at the very least (only grabbing 100 comments), and while it does have some options, it seems that none of those are available here. I had some issues with sorting this out with pure CSS (the Javascript was interfering with it), but I believe it is possible to implement this comment folding properly.

I've done a fair amount with pure CSS (Userstyle for Stylish here), including fixing the acres-of-whitespace width issue (Though I could do more if the source was in a better order), and bringing back the nicely contrasting bars to comments. I'm sure there is more that could also be done, and I'm seriously considering playing with GreaseMonkey to sort out some of the more egregious Javascript problems, but that's going to remain something on the back burner for now. This is obviously a beta site, and a work-in-progress, and I'm only doing this as a personal amusement in my spare time. I'll gladly answer any questions on this, and I'm certainly more than willing to lend a hand to make one of my favourite sites better.

There is much potential here. Unfortunately, a cannonball at the top of the Eiffel Tower also has much potential. Only time will tell how this is going to work out. But for the moment, it seems, SlashDot Beta is not ready for prime time. Heck, at this stage I'd barely call it a beta.

Comment: Re:Does it fix the comment threshold? (Score 1) 188

by Anaerin (#46178897) Attached to: Build an Open-Source Electric Car In About One Hour
No, you're not missing anything. What I can do (with CSS) is make it so that items that are "Removed" by the filter are instead collapsed down to their titles. I might be able to do even more than that, but that's all I've come up with so far. I'll let you know if I manage any more.

Comment: Re:I think (Score 1) 188

by Anaerin (#46178825) Attached to: Build an Open-Source Electric Car In About One Hour

Block images from stock image servers? They're annoying on all news sources/blogs, not just slashdot beta.

If the stock images have a common server (or url start) then you could. Or you could use an ad blocker for this.

Replace each stock image with the top result from a google image search for "stick figure" and the ALT text? Might as well have fun with it.

No, I'm afraid not. But if you wanted to do such a thing, you could configure yourself a squid proxy to do that kind of thing.

Replace "on hover" and "on mouseover" with "on click"? Just because I ran my pointer over a menu bar as opposed to navigating around it does not mean my desire was to spend the next 10 seconds trying to get the resulting popup menu to go away.

No, those are Javascript events, and CSS can't touch them. However, if this (and the second request above) is the kind of thing you want to do, you can use GreaseMonkey to inject your own custom Javascript, which could do all those funky things you want.

Comment: Re:Does it fix the comment threshold? (Score 1) 188

by Anaerin (#46175233) Attached to: Build an Open-Source Electric Car In About One Hour

Does it make the site remember your saved comment threshold preference and only send you the comments above the threshold you have in your profile?

Does it avoid having to use the slider on every page to specify the slider?

This is my main beef with beta, the rest I can work around or live with.

Doing some supplemental testing, I'm not sure what your beef is. On my machine (Running current FireFox Nightly), When you set your preferred threshold (using the dropdown above the comments), the value you specify gets set in a cookie, which then gets re-loaded on each subsequent page view. So I'm not sure where these issues are coming from. The code is there (and working) to do it.

Comment: Re:Does it fix the comment threshold? (Score 1) 188

by Anaerin (#46174957) Attached to: Build an Open-Source Electric Car In About One Hour

Does it make the site remember your saved comment threshold preference and only send you the comments above the threshold you have in your profile?

No, because it's just CSS. However, I'm thinking this could be solved with a little greasemonkey tweaking.

Does it avoid having to use the slider on every page to specify the slider?

Again, no. It's just CSS.

Does it avoid the need to have Javascript enabled for the domain?

I believe it will work without Javascript enabled. Of course, you won't HAVE any comments then, as they're loaded with Javascript. But these days, a vast majority of the web requires Javascript to function.

Does it use your computer resources to hide thresholds you are not interested in?

Again, no. But I'm spotting a theme here...

This is my main beef with beta, the rest I can work around or live with.

So, your problem seems to be that the new site isn't using your saved preference for what comments to display. This is something that is (at the moment) beyond the capabilities of my little stylesheet tweaks.

Comment: Where's the option to comment on the article? (Score 1) 237

by Anaerin (#46167415) Attached to: Update on the March of Progress: How Slashdot's New Look Is Shaping Up

There's so many things wrong here, so I tried to fix it. My fixes are published in a Userstyle for Stylish and Chrome here

If the side rail was in the source code before the main content, I could float it properly so the article and comments expand to use the empty space underneath. Unfortunately, it's not, so you'll have to make do with the dead space. Sorry.

If you want to contact me about this fix, feel free to do so. I should be contactable through here, or you can find my e-mail address in the linked userstyle.

Comment: What's unusual about this? (Score 5, Interesting) 1009

by Anaerin (#45941887) Attached to: Windows 9 Already? Apparently, Yes.
Microsoft has always attempted to follow an "Every 3 years" release schedule for new consumer operating systems, and they've pretty much kept to that schedule, apart from skipping a release in 2004:
  • 1995: Windows 95
  • 1998: Windows '98
  • 2001: Windows XP
  • 2004: Skipped
  • 2006: Windows Vista
  • 2009: Windows 7
  • 2012: Windows 8
  • 2015: Windows 9

So why is everyone acting so surprised when they keep following this trend?

Those who can, do; those who can't, simulate.

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