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Submission + - Sent to jail because of a software bug.

toshikodo writes: The BBC is reporting a claim that some sub-postoffice workers in the UK have been sent to jail because of a bug in the accounting software that they use. Post Office admits Horizon computer defect. I've worked on safety critical system in the past, and I am well aware of the potential for software to ruin lives (thankfully AFAIK nobody has been harmed by my software), but how many of us consider the potential for bugs in ordinary software to adversely affect those that use it?

Submission + - Fujitsu's New Data Transfer Protocol 30 Times Faster than TCP (paritynews.com) 1

hypnosec writes: Japan based technology giant, Fujitsu, has announced a new data transfer protocol that is capable of transferring data up to 30 times faster than that of currently used Transmission Control Protocol (TCP). The new technology, which is a proprietary, has been developed through a software-only approach and is based on User Datagram Protocol (UDP) that is used in streaming media. Even though UDP is a stateless protocol, Fujitsu’s technology has been developed such that it can differentiate between dropped packers and those which haven’t managed to reach the intended destination. Fujitsu carried out tests between US and Japan and the results were amazing – a 30 times improvement over TCP communications in data transfer throughput and a reduction in packet delivery latency to a sixth of previous levels.

Submission + - Does US Owe the World an Education at its Expense?

An anonymous reader writes: 'Right now, there are brilliant students from all over the world sitting in classrooms at our top universities,' President Obama explained to the nation Tuesday in his pitch for immigration reform. 'They are earning degrees in the fields of the future, like engineering and computer science...We are giving them the skills to figure that out, but then we are going to turn around and tell them to start the business and create those jobs in China, or India, or Mexico, or someplace else. That is not how you grow new industries in America. That is how you give new industries to our competitors. That is why we need comprehensive immigration reform." If the President truly fears that international students will use skills learned at U.S. colleges and universities to the detriment of the United States if they return home (isn't a rising tide supposed to lift all boats?) — an argument NYC Mayor Bloomberg advanced in 2011 ('we are investing millions of dollars [actually billions] to educate these students at our leading universities, and then giving the economic dividends back to our competitors – for free') — then wouldn't another option be not providing them with the skills in the first place?

Submission + - Why Oracle won't issue Java for iOS anytime soon (codenameone.com)

digiti writes: "They say that today all companies are software companies. In less than 5 years all companies will be mobile companies. So why isn't Oracle "getting it", why aren't they on the iPhone, on Android and even Windows Phone?
This post tries to answer that from the perspective of a former insider that talks about the DNA difference between Sun and Oracle with details that weren't discussed previously. Will Oracle suddenly flip on mobile like they did on cloud computing?"


Submission + - Using Big Data to Tame Cancer (informationweek.com)

CowboyRobot writes: "According to the U.K.'s Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), Big data could turn cancer into a "manageable" disease. A new facility, the Tumor Profiling Unit, has been set up with $4.7 million (£3 million) of public donations to explore vast datasets of cancer samples to better understand how these cells can adapt to become resistant to treatment. What's still missing is an expansive DNA database to better identify which genes are responsible for which cancers. Such a database could lead to new treatment techniques. For example if we know that two types of cancer share the same genetic cause, a drug used for one may also be used for the other."

Submission + - Researcher Finds 40-50 Million Devices Hackable Due To UPnP Bugs (forbes.com)

Sparrowvsrevolution writes: H.D. Moore of Rapid7 has discovered a set of security flaws in three different implementations of the set of common (and notoriously troublesome) networking protocols known as Universal Plug and Play, or UPnP. For nearly the last six months, he's been scanning the Internet for devices made vulnerable by those UPnP bugs, and has discovered somewhere between 40 and 50 million routers, printers, servers and other devices susceptible to some sort of hacker compromise via the public Internet. At least some routers from every major vendor are vulnerable. And 23 million of the devices could be completely taken over and used as Linux machines capable of attacking the rest of a victim's internal network.

Moore recommends that users disable UPnP on their networking gear and other devices immediately, and that ISPs even go so far as to push new firmware to consumers' home routers.


Submission + - Graphene and brain research to get around one billion euro in funding - each (gizmag.com)

cylonlover writes: The European Commission has announced two Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) Flagships that could each receive funding of a staggering one billion euro (US$1.3 billion) over a period of ten years. The “Graphene Flagship” and the “Human Brain Project” are large-scale, science-driven research initiatives designed to “fuel revolutionary discoveries” and provide major benefits for European society – hopefully creating new jobs and providing economic growth along the way.

The Graphene Flagship aims to get graphene out of the lab and into real world products and applications, while the Human Brain Project will attempt to gain a better understanding of our least understood organ so as to develop new treatments for brain diseases, build new computing technologies inspired by the architecture of the brain, and provide insights into what makes us human.


Submission + - Crypto collisions crash major hashes (scmagazine.com.au)

mask.of.sanity writes: Flaws have been found in cryptographic systems underpinning host of web applications including those offered by Google, Microsoft, Yahoo and those based on Java among scores of others.

The attacks target weaknesses in the hash algorithms that permit multiple hash collisions to take place.
Ruby On Rails, Mozilla and others have moved to a new hash built by the researchers who found the hole. Java has not.


Submission + - Putting biotech threats in context (sagepub.com)

Lasrick writes: Great anecdote: " In 1998, President Bill Clinton read a novel about biological warfare that deeply disturbed him. In fact, the story reportedly kept him up all night. It’s one of the reasons that Clinton became personally invested in protecting the United States from bioterrorism threats." Article goes on to describe the two trajectories of bioweapons threats, and puts them both in perspective. A must-read for anyone, like Bill Clinton, who's ever spent a sleepless night after reading one of the many bioterrorism novels

One picture is worth 128K words.