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Submission + - Community-sourced news site, soylentnews.org, goes live 18

umafuckit writes: soylentnews.org is the new way of taking the pulse of the nerd community. Soylentnews is a grassroots-based platform with the content feeds are powered by readers like you. The objective is to highlight news stories of general importance to everyone, but especially nerds. News about technology, art, science and politics: it's all there. Soylentnews is the new kid on the block and will adapt quickly to satisfy our community's needs and and push boundaries like never before. This is a real community site: no changes in format without a general consensus from the community. Stop by and see what you think of the freshly-launched site.

Submission + - NSA Still Funded to Spy On US Phone Records,Vote Fails 3

turp182 writes: The Amash Amendment (#100) to HR 2397 (DOD appropriations bill) failed to pass the House of Representatives (this link will change tomorrow, it is the current day activity of the House) at 6:54PM EST today, meaning it will not be added to the appropriations bill. The amendment would have specifically defunded the bulk collection of American phone records.

Roll call may not be available until tomorrow.

Subjective: Let freedom be reigned.

Submission + - Snowden Video Part 2 (guardian.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: 'In the second part of an exclusive interview with Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, former NSA contractor Edward Snowden contemplates the reaction from the US government to his revelations of top-secret documents regarding its spying operations on domestic and foreign internet traffic, email and phone use.' Theguardian

Submission + - Sent to jail because of a software bug.

toshikodo writes: The BBC is reporting a claim that some sub-postoffice workers in the UK have been sent to jail because of a bug in the accounting software that they use. Post Office admits Horizon computer defect. I've worked on safety critical system in the past, and I am well aware of the potential for software to ruin lives (thankfully AFAIK nobody has been harmed by my software), but how many of us consider the potential for bugs in ordinary software to adversely affect those that use it?

Submission + - Why do Protesters in Cairo Use Laser Pointers (bbc.co.uk) 1

Ahmed Shaban writes: Why do protesters in Cairo use laser pointers? At the beginning they were used to light up snipers on rooftops but later it just became fashionable to use them, and such things spread very fast among the youth of Cairo, who can find the high power laser pointers for sale on the sidewalks. The article contains amazing photos of what a choppers lit up by green laser pointers.

Submission + - Can the Slashdot effect save Ed Snowden? 1

NewtonsLaw writes: I read that Iceland has refused asylum and citizenship to whistleblower Ed Snowden.

In response to this, I wrote a very polite, email to the office of the Icelandic Prime Minister Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson (details on this webpage) expressing my disappointment at the decision and my sympathy for a once-proud nation that seems to have lost its nerve when faced with the might of the USA.

If anyone else wants to do the same then perhaps it's not too late to alert the Icelandic government to the fact that they could win millions of new friends from all over the world if they were to show their courage and bravery by helping Snowden, as they have with others in the past.

Of course any such communication needs to be polite, concise and focused on showing Iceland that the internet community supports Ed Snowden and those who are prepared to help him.

Maybe the Slashdot community can help. Why not spend a few quick minutes firing off an email so we can find out for sure.

Submission + - Ericsson Patents OpenMoney for the Good of Society (letstalkbitcoin.com)

An anonymous reader writes: From the article

Ericsson’s patent application published by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), 20130166398 on June 27th is for a “System And Method For Implementing A Context Based Payment System.” Two weeks prior to this filing, Ericsson announced “Open Money” and released this corresponding video by the same name. Jan Hallberg, Head of Marketing, Ericsson M-Commerce stated “It is our vision that one day everyone with access to a mobile phone will be able to spend, send and receive money as easily as sending a text via SMS.” Ericsson’s Homepage recently had a splash screen dedicated to Open Money and stated “When money is open, the way we send, spend and receive money will change forever."

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Will the NSA Controversy Drive People to Use Privacy Software? (slashdot.org) 1

Nerval's Lobster writes: As the U.S. government continues to pursue former NSA contractor Edward Snowden for leaking some of the country’s most sensitive intelligence secrets, the debate over federal surveillance seems to have abated somewhat—despite Snowden’s stated wish for his revelations to spark transformative and wide-ranging debate, it doesn’t seem as if anyone’s taking to the streets to protest the NSA’s reported monitoring of Americans’ emails and phone-call metadata. Even so, will the recent revelations about the NSA lead to a spike in demand for sophisticated privacy software, leading to a glut of new apps that vaporize or encrypt data? While there are quite a number of tools already on the market (SpiderOak, Silent Circle, and many more), is their presence enough to get people interested enough to install them? Or do you think the majority of people simply don't care? Despite some polling data that suggests people are concerned about their privacy, software for securing it is just not an exciting topic for most folks, who will rush to download the latest iteration of Instagram or Plants vs. Zombies, but who often throw up their hands and profess ignorance when asked about how they lock down their data.
Your Rights Online

Submission + - First File Sharer Fined By New Zealand's Copyright Tribunal (itnews.com.au)

aesoteric writes: "The first New Zealander has been found guilty by the country's Copyright Tribunal under an anti-file sharing law and ordered to pay a total of NZ$616.57 ($514) for downloading two songs, one of them twice. Controversially, rights holders who brought the action said that merely having BitTorrent software installed on a computer demonstrates flagrancy on the part of the file sharer. A further eleven alleged file sharers await their hearings before the tribunal."

Submission + - South Korea launching satellite, with live streaming video (kbs.co.kr) 2

thenextstevejobs writes: "South Korea will make another attempt at launching a satellite into orbit after two previous failed attempts. The launch will occur at January 30 4PM KST. A live HD video feed is available here. Click the white link that says ''. This launch comes shortly after North Korea's successful rocket launch last month."

Submission + - Why Oracle won't issue Java for iOS anytime soon (codenameone.com)

digiti writes: "They say that today all companies are software companies. In less than 5 years all companies will be mobile companies. So why isn't Oracle "getting it", why aren't they on the iPhone, on Android and even Windows Phone?
This post tries to answer that from the perspective of a former insider that talks about the DNA difference between Sun and Oracle with details that weren't discussed previously. Will Oracle suddenly flip on mobile like they did on cloud computing?"


Submission + - Graphene and brain research to get around one billion euro in funding - each (gizmag.com)

cylonlover writes: The European Commission has announced two Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) Flagships that could each receive funding of a staggering one billion euro (US$1.3 billion) over a period of ten years. The “Graphene Flagship” and the “Human Brain Project” are large-scale, science-driven research initiatives designed to “fuel revolutionary discoveries” and provide major benefits for European society – hopefully creating new jobs and providing economic growth along the way.

The Graphene Flagship aims to get graphene out of the lab and into real world products and applications, while the Human Brain Project will attempt to gain a better understanding of our least understood organ so as to develop new treatments for brain diseases, build new computing technologies inspired by the architecture of the brain, and provide insights into what makes us human.


Submission + - Whonix: Building an anonymous operating system (computerworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: "Whonix is an attempt to build an open source operating system that puts a premium on privacy. It's based on Debian and Tor, but uses a novel virtual dual machine setup to sandbox applications so that even if there is an IP leak (either intentional or unintentional) a user's 'real' IP address should still be safe (with all the caveats that using Tor implies). I caught up with its creator Adrelanos to talk about how the project works and his future plans for the OS."

Submission + - Turning SF's Bay Bridge into a Giant LED Display (xconomy.com)

waderoush writes: "It may be the biggest art hack ever: a project to install 25,000 individually addressable LED lights on the western span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. New York-based 'light sculptor' Leo Villareal was in San Francisco last week to test the vast 'Bay Lights' art installation, which will officially debut on March 5 and last for two years; Xconomy has photos and video of Villareal running the light show from his laptop. To optimize his algorithms and figure out which patterns would be most interesting or arresting, Villareal needed to experiment on the bridge itself, says Bay Lights director Ben Davis, who has raised $5.8 million for the project so far. 'This has never been done before in history — literally debugging software 500 feet in the air, in front of a million people,' says Davis."

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