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Comment oooh GMO is to oscary u guys! (Score 1) 432

> There only real risk is that maybe by some huge stroke of bad luck, some other plant (a weed, say) picks up glyphosate resistance from these genes

Well, I'm glad we have you to think through every single possible chemical, biological interaction between a genetically modified plant and the rest of the environment, which we humans understand and can model perfectly. Complex coupled system dynamics ... easy for jeffmeden! Of course we can predict all the consequences of our actions, especially when applied on an industrial / global scale in a short few years. Why worry that there may be something that we haven't thought of which will manifest itself in a generation or two. After all, it's only the world's food supply and our life support system (the environment) that we're talking about here. If by some astronomically unlikely chance we've made a mistake we can just hit the reset button and try again. There is a reset button on the Earth, right?

Comment Re:ISS @ 250 miles, why 36,000 km? (Score 1) 488

Because 36,000km is where geostationary orbit is ... the elevator is tied to the surface of the earth, and so makes one rotation per day. You *could* get off at 360km, but you'd be moving waaay below orbital speed and would fall straight (actually elliptically) back to earth. No chance of docking with the ISS, which makes an orbit approx every 90 minutes IIRC.


How To Make a Good Gaming Sequel 150

Kantor48 writes "In today's world of unimproved gaming sequels and saturated franchises, Arthur Kabrick looks at the best and worst sequels in recent history, and compares the changes they've made to the formulae of their franchises. By doing this, he comes up with a list of lessons that any game developer creating a sequel should follow, if at all possible, to ensure that the new game is a step up, rather than a step sideways or, as in some cases, a step down. The criteria include ensuring the game does not spend too much time in development, updating technology, and trying not to change the development team, as well as being wary of changing the basic formula so much that fans of the franchise are alienated."

More Evidence For Steam Games On Linux 256

SheeEttin writes "Back in November 2008, Phoronix reported that Linux libraries appeared in the Left 4 Dead demo, and then in March, Valve announced that Steam and the Source engine were coming to Mac OS X. Now, Phoronix reports that launcher scripts included with the (closed beta) Mac version of Steam include explicit support for launching a Linux version."

Police Called Over 11-Year-Old's Science Project 687

garg0yle writes "Police in San Diego were called to investigate an 11-year-old's science project, consisting of 'a motion detector made out of an empty Gatorade bottle and some electronics,' after the vice-principal came to the conclusion that it was a bomb. Charges aren't being laid against the youth, but it's being recommended that he and his family 'get counseling.' Apparently, the student violated school policies — I'm assuming these are policies against having any kind of independent thought?"

2009, Year of the Linux Delusion 696

gadgetopia writes "An article has come out claiming (yet again) that 2009 will be the year of Linux, and bases this prediction on the fact that low-power ARM processors will be in netbooks which won't have enough power to run Windows, but then says these new netbooks will be geared to 'web only' applications which suits Linux perfectly. And, oh yeah, Palm might save Linux, too." The article goes on to skewer the year of Linux thing that seems to show up on pretty much every tech news site throughout December and January as lazy editors round out their year with softball trolling stories and "Year End Lists." We should compile a year-end list about this :)

UK Government Says More Spying Needed 297

An anonymous reader writes "Our wonderful government here in the UK has decided we're not being surveilled enough, and agreed to spend £12 billion on a programme to monitor every Briton's phone calls, e-mails, and internet usage. According to various sources, upwards of £1 billion has already been spent on the uber-database. Rationale? Terrorism, of course (no prizes for guessing). Needless to say, not everyone is as happy as Larry over this: Michael Parker pointed out how us Brits are being 'stalked.' I'm just looking forward to when the data gets lost."

Uncertain fortune is thoroughly mastered by the equity of the calculation. - Blaise Pascal