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Comment: Re:Advanced? Requires a Jailbreak & manual ins (Score 1) 66

by AmiMoJo (#48045613) Attached to: iOS Trojan Targets Hong Kong Protestors

GCHQ claims to be able to access any iPhone, jailbroken or not. It stands to reason that it is possible, since clearly the jailbreak exploit itself is cable of exploiting a non-jailbroken phone. Other malware could discover and use the same weaknesses.

Remember when you could jailbreak just by visiting a website?

Comment: Re:Let's put things back into perspective (Score 1) 104

by AmiMoJo (#48045581) Attached to: Japan's Shinkansen Bullet Trains Celebrate 50th Anniversary

The step up from 160km/h to 210km/h was a major breakthrough and required the development of several new technologies. It wasn't just a case of fitting a bigger motor and pushing the throttle a bit harder.

One of the biggest problems was oscillation in the suspension, which required a new type of dampener to be developed to prevent the train derailing at high speed. They also had to develop new pantographs to avoid destroying the overhead lines at high speed, and a new completely electronic and automatic signalling system as normal signals pass by too quickly for the driver to reliably see.

Over the 50 years of operation their safety record has been pretty much spotless, in a country that has regular major earthquakes. Punctuality is incredible too. In 2007 the average delay from the advertised schedule was 18 seconds, including delays due to natural disasters.

The current 320km/h is limited by concerns over noise. The trains are rated for about 380km/h, but they need to improve tunnels to prevent the noise created when the train emerges before they can go that fast.

Comment: Re:Antecdotes != Evidence (Score 1) 441

by AmiMoJo (#48045481) Attached to: Will Windows 10 Finally Address OS Decay?

Macs get it just as badly, as does every OS that allows programs to install things that hook into the OS or run in the background. For example, if you install an app that lets the Finder show thumbnails of some image format it previously could not display you have just added extra code that needs to be loaded, and extra RAM use to store it. Your computer got a bit slower. Similarly if you install an app to show some extra data on your desktop, now it is running when you boot your computer (longer boot time) and use resources (RAM, CPU time).

My friend installed Norton on his Mac years ago, it was crippled instantly. He removed it eventually and everything was fine again. There is nothing magical about Mac OS.

Comment: Re:LOL. You expect MS to fix the problem ... (Score 1) 441

by AmiMoJo (#48045449) Attached to: Will Windows 10 Finally Address OS Decay?

The registry is a database. It is designed to store vast numbers of keys in a hierarchy, and a default install of Windows will have tens of thousands of them. Even the most bloated apps will only add a fraction of a percent to that. Performance of the registry really isn't the issue.

Performance problems come from app that hook in to other things, particularly explorer. That is done via the registry, but the registry itself isn't the problem. For example, if you install Adobe Reader it sets up a DLL with a hook that makes Explorer load it in order to provide thumbnail previews of PDF files. This slows the machine down because now Explorer takes longer to load, uses more memory and executes extra code when a PDF file is displayed as a thumbnail.

Comment: Re:Application sandboxing (Score 1) 441

by AmiMoJo (#48045425) Attached to: Will Windows 10 Finally Address OS Decay?

You really can't do anything much about old programs wanting to write to arbitrary parts of the disk, because you'll find a lot of applications that just plain won't work. I guess you could trick the application into thinking it's writing to a certain part of the disk when in reality it's just writing to a subdirectory in it's own private folder, but that would create even more problems, when the user decided to save a file, and couldn't find it later because it saved the file inside some virtual folder that only existed for that one application.

Actually that's exactly what Windows has been doing since Vista. Both the filesystem and registry became virtualized, so apps couldn't shit all over them any more. Apps that attempt to write into virtualized directories are transparently redirected to safe locations.

To be fair it did break some stuff, but not much. The main issue was that it was slow, but they fixed that in Windows 7.

Comment: Re:And still nothing in the US (Score 1) 104

by AmiMoJo (#48045175) Attached to: Japan's Shinkansen Bullet Trains Celebrate 50th Anniversary

They do have luggage areas, just not enough for everyone. They are only in certain cars, usually near the rather spacious toilets. Most people don't have luggage, but I have taken a large suitcase and large carry-on bag on the shinkansen a few times between Osaka and Tokyo.

Comment: Re:And still nothing in the US (Score 1) 104

by AmiMoJo (#48040739) Attached to: Japan's Shinkansen Bullet Trains Celebrate 50th Anniversary

High speed rail is nothing like flying or driving. It's a lot faster on many routes for a start. No going to the airport and going through security, waiting to take off and disembark etc. Much faster and more direct than driving, no traffic jams. It's a lot more comfortable, you can relax, work, eat or whatever.

Places that are a long way away are suddenly just a short train journey away. It's fantastic for visiting places, fantastic for business. Japan's economy benefits hugely from having high speed rail, even if the cost is high. Japanese companies are willing to look at the long term for ROI.

Comment: Re:And many, many more (Score 1) 833

by AmiMoJo (#48039657) Attached to: David Cameron Says Brits Should Be Taught Imperial Measures

I'd don't know where you live but it's not the UK I recognize.

In the UK we sell most drinks in litres or millilitres, and I would prefer to get milk that way too. Beer is an exception but when in Japan I don't find buying it by the litre at all burdensome.

Ingredients in recipes are mostly metric now, or use both units. I always use metric because like anyone else who went to school in the last 40 years I never bothered to learn Imperial measures.

I measure my height in centimetres, always have done. Clearances for vehicles are given in metric, not least because foreign drivers from the continent wouldn't have a clue otherwise.

I ask what the fuel economy is in l/100km, or more often just read it off the spec sheet attached to the car in the showroom. It's a more useful metric than MPG, and besides which fuel is sold in litres. Wood is sold in metric units, e.g. the last bit I bought was a 1200x600mm sheet of plywood.

The weather reports on TV are in Celsius, and it's becoming less and less common for them to bother reporting Fahrenheit. In fact the only people who do are low quality newspapers, and I never have a clue what they are on about when their front pages scream "90F HEATWAVE!"

Comment: Re:the solution: (Score 1) 499

by AmiMoJo (#48039393) Attached to: The $1,200 DIY Gunsmithing Machine

Do you honestly think that allowing random citizens to buy surface to air missiles is a good idea?

Let's just ignore the difficulty that would cause for commercial aircraft for a moment and concentrate on your suggestion that such weapons are necessary to revolt against tyranny. Unfortunately such things are mostly ineffective against the government's most powerful and destructive weapon - apathy. As long as they keep broadcasting reality TV you are screwed. Maybe an EMP would be more effective.

Realistically though, even if you somehow got hold of a nuke or two it's doubtful that you could take down the government that way. The government is prepared to survive a massive nuclear assault from a foreign country, so your efforts will be like a mosquito bite. Maybe instead of trying to win an arms race with your government you should look for other ways to reign it in.

Comment: Re:the solution: (Score 1) 499

by AmiMoJo (#48039335) Attached to: The $1,200 DIY Gunsmithing Machine

The bans are a terrible compromise between those who want to ban as many guns as possible and those who want to allow them all. You can't judge them as any kind of reasoned argument or attempt at rational gun control, because they are the product of a democracy dominated by extremely heavy lobbying and ignorance.

Since neither side will ever compromise, that's what you are stuck with.

Comment: Re:Simple answer (Score 1) 833

by AmiMoJo (#48035047) Attached to: David Cameron Says Brits Should Be Taught Imperial Measures

100 seems insanely hot. I think I would melt. I've never experienced that temperature outside of a sauna or bath. Seems like a rather arbitrary "hot summer day", based on where you happen to live. Here a hot summer day would be about 80F.

For most human beings temperature is only part of the equation when deciding how to dress or what to do today. Humidity, rainfall and wind are also very important. I can take 30C if it isn't humid, or 0C if it isn't windy.

Comment: Re:No 9? (Score 1) 637

by AmiMoJo (#48034931) Attached to: Microsoft Announces Windows 10

Indeed, 9 does not seem to be a problem in Japan. I used to play a lot of A-Train 9, for example. It's not like 4 where manufacturers will always skip it. My Panasonic TV came out the year after the 3 series, but it's a 5 series because they skipped over 4.

I wonder if it's because of China. 9 seems to be unlucky there too. I think the ku reading is the Chinese reading. There are buildings in Hong Kong with no 4th, 9th or 13th floors.

Comment: Re:Better call it Windows 11 (Score 1) 637

by AmiMoJo (#48034863) Attached to: Microsoft Announces Windows 10

The last one to have a boot up tune as well. After that they switched to a simple sound effect instead of music.

I kinda miss those tunes. They were a nice little celebration that the computer didn't crash on boot. If they stuttered you knew your PC sucked and couldn't multi-task. The only flaw was that there was usually a few more minutes of loading start-up apps after they finished before the OS was really ready to use.

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