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Comment: Re:Survival (Score 1) 264

by AmiMoJo (#48026137) Attached to: Energy Utilities Trying To Stifle Growth of Solar Power

Tesla claims 3000 cycles for their batteries. That gives a theoretical life for the car of 900,000 miles (300 miles, 3000 charges) and they have tested up to 750,000 miles with about 85% capacity remaining, so it looks reasonable.

Of course, that assumes you do full cycles every time. You can get significantly more life with only 10 or 20% over capacity.

Comment: Re:If government wants to get involved... (Score 1) 264

by AmiMoJo (#48026105) Attached to: Energy Utilities Trying To Stifle Growth of Solar Power

They should instead allow the true cost of solar and other power sources be reflected in the price

Electricity is a basic utility for most people. They can't live a reasonable life without things like electric lighting and refrigeration. More over the economy would suffer greatly if the true cost of electricity was reflected in the price that industry pays.

That's why almost all sources of electricity are heavily subsidised. The question is which ones do we want to encourage, and the answer isn't coal.

Comment: Re:net metering != solar and 10% needs new physics (Score 1) 264

by AmiMoJo (#48026091) Attached to: Energy Utilities Trying To Stifle Growth of Solar Power

The UK has had this kind of thing for many years. The electricity company provides special outlets that it can switch on and off remotely. They switch on when energy is cheap at night. People connect water heaters to them, and then keep the water in an insulated tank for use during the day. Some people connect other stuff to them as well, like EV chargers.

Comment: Re:Fine. Legislate for externalities. (Score 1) 264

by AmiMoJo (#48026067) Attached to: Energy Utilities Trying To Stifle Growth of Solar Power

That sounds simple in theory. In reality? You're just blowing smoke - because online storage in the capacities required simply doesn't exist.

Energy companies have a choice. They can sit in their arses and wait to die, or they can try to find solutions to these problems. If I were them I'd be calling up Elon Musk today and asking to discus ways of building grid scale batteries. 50MW batteries have been deployed in Japan for a few years now, so the technology is coming and they can either benefit from it themselves or miss out and find that individuals have installed them at home already.

Batteries are not the only solution. There are options. They are not easy, do-nothing options, but that's the way of the world. Evolve or die.

Comment: Re:Fine. Legislate for externalities. (Score 1) 264

by AmiMoJo (#48026055) Attached to: Energy Utilities Trying To Stifle Growth of Solar Power

Nobody is quashing an emerging industry. What they're saying is that they don't want to have to buy electricity from everybody.

What they are saying is that they want to keep generating dirty, polluting electricity because it is profitable and easy for them. Unfortunately that has costs for society and the rest of the economy, so we are going to have to transition away from it.

Comment: Re:I still don't get this. (Score 2) 299

by AmiMoJo (#48010647) Attached to: Consumer Reports: New iPhones Not As Bendy As Believed

That's how Steve Jobs always presented new iPhones. Faster, thinner, longer battery life, one or two major new features. The major new features no one else has part seem to have gone, and while faster the 6 is in most common operations about the same as a Nexus 5. Battery life is about the same. So they cling to being slightly thinner.

I had a funny thought. The only other product I can think of that is obsessed with getting thinner is condoms.

Comment: Re:Yes, reality is a defense (Score 2) 299

by AmiMoJo (#48010357) Attached to: Consumer Reports: New iPhones Not As Bendy As Believed

Last I heard they were admitting to nine reports of bending, but the reality is we don't have a true figure at this time. It was the same with the antenna problems. They denied many people had them but eventually fixed it anyway with a free bumper.

I imagine somewhere in Apple's labs they are testing strengthened cases

Comment: Re:30-46% less force is required to deform?! (Score 1) 299

by AmiMoJo (#48010333) Attached to: Consumer Reports: New iPhones Not As Bendy As Believed

The problem seems to be twofold. Firstly it's weaker than average for a high end phone, and people probably associate metal with being stronger than plastic so expect more from it. It's also a big change from the pervious model.

Secondly phones made of other materials return to their original shape much more easily. Of you look at most of the images of iPhones that were bent in people's pockets the bend is slight. Other phones recover from that, the iPhone 6 remains bent.

Comment: Re:Really? (Score 4, Insightful) 465

by AmiMoJo (#48009057) Attached to: Utilities Should Worry; Rooftop Solar Could Soon Cut Their Profit

that legal system for selling electricity was jury-rigged

That phrase... I do not think it means what you think it means.

Germany is in the middle of the transition. There are still 10 years to go. Things can get a bit extreme at times, but it's basically working really well. Short term price increases (still not the most expensive in Europe) and increased CO2 in exchange for being nuclear free, down heavily on coal and gas, and up massively on renewables by 2024. It also makes Germany the world leader in renewables, so German companies are getting all that business overseas too.

Luckyo, you seem to have either not understood or ignored my reply last time, or maybe you just feel butthurt that your cool nuclear tech is being pushed out in favour of hippy windmills and solar panels. I'm sorry you feel that way.

Comment: Re:Not so.... (Score 2) 465

by AmiMoJo (#48009041) Attached to: Utilities Should Worry; Rooftop Solar Could Soon Cut Their Profit

Actually, the cost of subsidizing solar and wind has doubled the cost of power in Germany

Sure, although even now it isn't the most expensive in Europe. The cost will be high for a while, and Germans seem to accept that. Change costs money, but the end result is worth it.

And Germany's power industry is increasing the amount of energy generated with coal.

It's reducing the amount of coal burnt: http://energytransition.de/201...

Comment: Re:cut utility profits from 8% to 41% (Score 2) 465

by AmiMoJo (#48008323) Attached to: Utilities Should Worry; Rooftop Solar Could Soon Cut Their Profit

Subsidy of solar tends to pay for itself. In the end we all have to pay for new capacity, be out through energy bills or taxes. Solar more than pays for itself, reduces pollution and tends to encourage the owner to be more efficient.

Also, often the subsidy is actually a loan.

16.5 feet in the Twilight Zone = 1 Rod Serling

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