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Comment: Re:Where are these photos? (Score 1) 206

by AmiMoJo (#47802379) Attached to: Reported iCloud Hack Leaks Hundreds of Private Celebrity Photos

Actually Apple do claim that iCloud is very secure: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT...

Apple have long claimed to offer platforms free from malware and protected from hacking too. iOS even protects your kids from inappropriate content. Apple make big claims about security all the time.

Comment: Re:Where are these photos? (Score 1) 206

by AmiMoJo (#47802355) Attached to: Reported iCloud Hack Leaks Hundreds of Private Celebrity Photos

If someone put their money in a reputable bank and it was stolen, would you blame them? The photos were in password protected accounts from a reputable company that claimed to be secure. There were no "your photos may be hacked" warnings. While it may seem obvious to people like us that the risk is there, most people don't think that way and can't really be blamed for not doing so. How is a password for iCloud any different from the password for your online banking or PIN number for the average person?

They evaluated the risks with the information they had, and Apple failed them. If Apple were a bank they would be entirely liable for any financial loss, no question.

Comment: Re:Where are these photos? (Score 1) 206

by AmiMoJo (#47802219) Attached to: Reported iCloud Hack Leaks Hundreds of Private Celebrity Photos

What it comes down to is, if you don't want naked pictures of yourself to end up for all the world to see, don't take naked pictures of yourself.

Many of the photos appear to be taken by other people. In any case, people should be free to explore their sexuality with photos if they want, without the risk that they will be broadcast to the world. It's bad enough that paparazzi use telephoto lenses to take pictures of people in their own private areas.

Poor security is not a given, it's just the norm. Don't accept it. If more companies were facing lawsuits with truly punitive damages they might make more of an effort.

Comment: Re:Some outrage motivated by image control/PR/mone (Score 1) 206

by AmiMoJo (#47802087) Attached to: Reported iCloud Hack Leaks Hundreds of Private Celebrity Photos

I imagine many of them want to be seen as serious actresses and realize that doing excessive, unwarranted nudity early in their careers would sabotage that. Maybe later when they are established they can feel more relaxed about it, but when young doing topless/nude screens is pretty much the mark of a talentless only-there-for-her-looks b-list star. There are exceptions of course, but they are just that - exceptions.

Comment: Re:If you care about data security, don't use Appl (Score 1) 206

by AmiMoJo (#47801339) Attached to: Reported iCloud Hack Leaks Hundreds of Private Celebrity Photos

While true that Apple is by no means the worst at security, they are one of the most image concious companies in the world and if there is a celebrity backlash due to these leaks it could really harm them. Doesn't help their iPhone 6 launch in the next week or two either.

Security

Reported iCloud Hack Leaks Hundreds of Private Celebrity Photos 206

Posted by samzenpus
from the gates-are-open dept.
swinferno writes with news about the leak of hundreds of private celebrity photos over the weekend. Hundreds of revealing pictures of female celebrities were leaked overnight after being stolen from their private collections. Hunger Games actress Jennifer Lawrence, Kirsten Dunst, and pop star Ariana Grande were among the celebrities apparently shown in the pictures, which were posted on infamous web forum 4chan. It's unclear how the images were obtained, but anonymous 4chan users said that they were taken from celebrities' iCloud accounts. The accounts are designed to allow iPhone, iPad, and Mac users to synchronize images, settings, calendar information, and other data between devices, but the service has been criticized for being unreliable and confusing. Earlier this year, Jennifer Lawrence herself complained about the service in an interview with MTV.

Comment: Re:Bad timing, Apple (Score 2) 153

by AmiMoJo (#47799561) Attached to: Apple Said To Team With Visa, MasterCard On iPhone Wallet

It appears to be confirmed now: http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/...

Worryingly some of the affected claim that the images which were leaked had been deleted years ago. If you want your iCloud account deleted rather than just made inactive you have to call Apple and get a tech to call you back.

Comment: Re:If the Grand Ayatollah's against it.... (Score 1) 438

by AmiMoJo (#47799513) Attached to: Grand Ayatollah Says High Speed Internet Is "Against Moral Standards"

Pffft. Strip Poker was available for the C64 and ZX Spectrum. In both cases the image was black and white (not greyscale, just black OR white) and on the Spectrum the graphics were a crude line drawing. The C64 managed to have some badly digitized images.

I take this as proof that there is almost no limit to what teenage boys can wank over.

Comment: Re:Broadcom... (Score 1) 164

by AmiMoJo (#47799461) Attached to: Update: Raspberry Pi-Compatible Development Board Cancelled

I mean, a computer aimed at education, and then you cannot publish the full datasheet?

Considering that all the computers in use at the time the RPi was introduced were proprietary and didn't come with a datasheet it doesn't sound that crazy. The RPi is designed to get children interesting in programming and a bit of electronics, not teach them about low level CPU architecture or how to interface with a hardware UART. That's advanced stuff and there are platforms that cater to it. The Pi is there to get you started cheaply and doing some interesting and useful stuff.

Most of the kids who learned to program the original BBC Micro didn't understand how it worked, they just write code in BASIC.

Comment: Re:Broadcom won't release documentation ever (Score 1) 164

by AmiMoJo (#47799425) Attached to: Update: Raspberry Pi-Compatible Development Board Cancelled

That's because they target different markets. Texas parts do more in hardware, and thus much of their operation is "secret" as in to figure it out you would have to reverse engineer at the transistor level. They also cost more.

Broadcom parts target the very low cost end of the market by doing things in software to save silicon. They are also a bit more cutting edge so there are more trade secrets in there to start with. Software is very easy to analyze and anyone writing their own drivers will need documentation for the secret stuff.

You pay your money, you make your choice. More open but more expensive, or cheaper but with binary blob drivers and NDAs on everything.

Comment: Re:Since nuclear is "too cheap to meter"... (Score 1) 218

by AmiMoJo (#47799381) Attached to: Feds Want Nuclear Waste Train, But Don't Know Where It Would Go

I'm merely going with a source that was closest to the original speaker and is thus most qualified (although potentially biased, as you note)

Actually members of the subject's family are not usually considered qualified to judge their actions due to their obvious and extreme bias. To dismiss it as "potentially" is extremely generous. In academic circles or any court of law a close family member's testimony would count for little, especially when other less biased people have made compelling and convincing arguments contrary to their's.

Comment: Re:And if they hade a place to store the waste. (Score 1) 218

by AmiMoJo (#47799359) Attached to: Feds Want Nuclear Waste Train, But Don't Know Where It Would Go

The most stable rock plate in Canada, known as the canadian shield is 4,5 bn years old to 540 millions years old and is stable since then.

This kind of hubris is what caused many of the problems Japan is facing at the moment. Geologists "knew" that certain areas were geologically stable, right up until they were checked again with more modern equipment and faults were found right underneath nuclear power plants. It's not that no-one looked before, it's just that the tools didn't exist and the understanding of geology at the time didn't see any problems.

Japan is extreme in terms of geological activity, but when you are looking to store dangerous waste of extremely long periods of time even relatively stable areas are difficult to rely on.

Comment: Re:And if they hade a place to store the waste. (Score 1) 218

by AmiMoJo (#47799337) Attached to: Feds Want Nuclear Waste Train, But Don't Know Where It Would Go

Decades of propaganda have lots of people afraid and opposed to atomic* or nuclear* in general. In the wake of Fukushima we have already seen major western nations shutter their nuclear generating.

Presumably you are talking about European countries, and specifically Germany. That isn't a fair characterization of the situation there.

Before Fukushima many of Germany's coal plants were due to be closed and replaced with more modern, cleaner ones anyway. Nuclear plants were thought to have another few decades of life extensions in them. However, there was already a strong movement towards clean energy, and towards reducing Germany's dependence on imported coal and gas, and against the high cost of nuclear. Fukushima was just a catalyst that sped up the time-table for re-building the grid.

Germany is aiming to complete the transition by around 2025, so still has a decade to go. At the moment there are minus 6 new coal plants being build - in other words even with the new plants due to the old ones closing (as planned before Fukushima) there will be six fewer. The new ones are unlikely to ever make any money. Nuclear didn't pan out, it was too expensive and never achieved the level of safety that proponents said it would, so no more chances I'm afraid.

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