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Comment: Re:... Profit (Score 1) 528

by AmiAthena (#45023133) Attached to: California Outlaws 'Revenge Porn'
I absolutely see your point, but it almost sounds like you'd be OK with letting the other 92% off with no consequences, just in case. (Not saying you said that at all, just that it could be inferred.) I have very mixed feelings about laws and false convictions, because it's *very* hard to know where to draw the line. Obviously, I'm against false convictions, but the debate arises at some point because we can't accept that every offense can't be absolutely factually verified, so we can't be sure what does and doesn't merit ruining the accused's life... but we also can't just decide that any offense that could be falsified gets a free pass. There's no one all-purpose, ironclad answer.

Comment: Re:Intent is the key word... (Score 1) 528

by AmiAthena (#45023039) Attached to: California Outlaws 'Revenge Porn'
Unless the photos in question have been uploaded to a site specifically and explicitly existing for the purpose of revenge-shaming your ex. There are plenty of cases that would be very hard to nail down, but there are also a fair amount where it would be pretty hard to wiggle out of admitting that you were doing exactly what the URL says.
Robotics

Robot Composed of "Catoms" Can Assume Any Form 168

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the come-with-me-if-you-want-to-live dept.
philetus writes "An article in New Scientist describes a robotic system composed of swarms of electromagnetic modules capable of assuming almost any form that is being developed by the Claytronics Group at Carnegie Mellon. 'The grand goal is to create swarms of microscopic robots capable of morphing into virtually any form by clinging together. Seth Goldstein, who leads the research project at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, in the US, admits this is still a distant prospect. However, his team is using simulations to develop control strategies for futuristic shape-shifting, or "claytronic", robots, which they are testing on small groups of more primitive, pocket-sized machines.'"
Role Playing (Games)

World of Warcraft Gold Limit Reached, It's 2^31 479

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the and-i-thought-my-life-was-void dept.
Mitch writes "Blizzard apparently used signed integers for their World of Warcraft gold values as some people have recently hit the limit of 2^31. "Apparently that amount is 214,748 gold, 36 silver, 48 copper. After you reach that lofty sum, you'll no longer be able to receive money from any source in the game. While some responses to the original posts claim that this exact limit had previously been theorized to exist, there have been no reports of anyone in the game actually achieving this amount via legal means." I guess Blizzard didn't expect anyone to ever get close to that much gold in game."
Toys

How To Turn a Mini Maglite Into a Laser 605

Posted by samzenpus
from the a-thousand-tiny-burn-marks dept.
Lucas123 writes "Using the laser from a DVD burner, this instructional video shows you how to create a hand-held laser that is powerful enough to light a match and pop a balloon. There's some soldering involved and the Maglite's bulb housing needs to be drilled out to fit the new laser diode, but with some basic skill, most people could do this. Just plain cool." Update: 07/09 12:23 GMT by KD : Warning, the device that results from following these instructions will blind you if you look into it.
The Internet

Wikipedia Corrects Encyclopedia Britannica 381

Posted by kdawson
from the just-plain-wrong dept.
javipas writes "Despite all the controversy about Wikipedia's work model, no one can argue the potential of a project that has so effectively demonstrated the usefulness of the 'wisdom of crowds' concept. And that wisdom has detected a large number of mistakes in one of the most revered founts of human knowledge, the Encyclopedias Britannica. Among the wrong information collected on this page are the name at birth of Bill Clinton and the definition of the NP problems in mathematics."
Democrats

+ - Mike Gravel: "I would legalize marijuana."

Submitted by had3l
had3l (814482) writes "In an interview on C-SPAN, democratic candidate Mike Gravel stated that he would change the drug policy and legalize marijuana: "Marijuana is a simple one, we legalize it, and you should be able to buy it at a liquor store, just like you buy alcohol". Other candidates have stood up against the present "War on Drugs", but he is the first one to mention legalization."
Sun Microsystems

+ - "Open Office made me switch to Mac"

Submitted by Gary
Gary (666) writes "Australian software developer news site Builder AU are reporting on National ICT Australia's Professor Gernot Heiser blunt words for the OpenOffice community at OpenCeBIT this week — "If you want to be successful in open source it can't just be a 'me too' product. Anything that's not the best technology will not work ... enterprise is willing to pay for the best. OpenOffice is not the best ..." Has the OpenOffice.org community been resting on their laurels?"
Censorship

+ - Illegal Hex Code in Indelible Tattoo Ink

Submitted by SPQR_Julian
SPQR_Julian (967179) writes ""So... how do you DMCA a tattoo off of a person?" Body Modification E-magazine(BME) is fairly well the premier authority and source of information for modified people. So when the owner Shannon Larratt put out the call to see if anyone had (or would get) the HD-DVD code tattooed on their skin, it was only a matter of time before someone did. Now the question is, what will the MPAA do in response?"
Windows

+ - Windows Uptime Maximum 3 Months

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Ever see the Windows vs Linux uptime graphs? I think NetCraft has some really good ones comparing Apache and IIS web-servers. Well they're the most inaccurate measurement of uptime available to mankind and should be completely ignored when comparing uptime propensity of a particular operation system. The reason? Microsoft forces you to reboot your server after applying security updates. So if we say Microsoft releases a critical update 4 times a year, we can conclude that the average uptime of a Microsoft server is 3 months. Pretty quick and easy math. No graphs needed here. What do you think should be a proper measurement of uptime? Is Microsoft guilty of falsely advertising their products as reliable? Could that be grounds for misrepresentation?"

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