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Comment: Re:There's no "THE" reason (Score 1) 931

by Alpha Whisky (#33777504) Attached to: 66% of All Windows Users Still Use Windows XP

Sounds like you want logmein free, works great on Windows 7 and XP. You might want to disable the mirror driver in Windows 7 or Vista if it causes you to lose Aero effects.

If I recall correctly one of the optional updates for XP is the updated client for the more recent RDP server in Windows 7.

Comment: It's not what this ipod touch user wants (Score 1) 178

by Alpha Whisky (#33732060) Attached to: Chinese 'Apple Peel' Turns iPods Into iPhones

I have an ipod touch and this is definitely not what I want. I didn't buy an iphone because all it is is a thicker, heavier ipod touch with worse battery life and a mediocre phone and camera built in. I have a nice, small, light mobile phone with an acceptable camera and it doesn't make me look like a tit holding a metal brick up to my ear to make a call.

No, what this ipod touch user wants is iOS support (or at a pinch an app) to allow me to do what the ipod touch hardware is perfectly capable of, I want to be able to bond my ipod touch through bluetooth to my cheap but very capable phone for mobile internet access on the ipod. That would be the best of both worlds, a phone which works great and a mobile entertainment device which works great. As a bonus you could also still use the ipod while talking on the phone, can the iphone do that?

Comment: Re:GUI Code Only (Score 1) 175

by Alpha Whisky (#29951548) Attached to: Skype For Linux To Be Open-Sourced "In the Nearest Future"

Most SIP clients I've seen support STUN, which allows two NAT'd clients to talk to each other. The basic way that it works is for both clients to send a UDP packet to the STUN server. Their stateful NATs then set up a mapping from the public port to the private port. The server then forwards the address and port to each of the parties and then they can communicate with each other on that port. This needs a server set up on the public Internet, but so does Skype (so you can find the peer to peer network).

You just made fearlezz's point for him, I've highlighted the points where you did it. Yes, Skype needs servers, but the whole point is that Skype provides servers, some penniless foss project isn't going to provide servers which can cope with 18,989,413 clients at the same time (number plucked from Skype right now, the peak is probably higher).

Cellphones

Why Japan Hates the iPhone 884

Posted by kdawson
from the one-man's-cool-is-another-man's-lame dept.
Ponca City, We love you writes "With a high level of technical sophistication, critical customers, and high innovation rate, Japan is the toughest cell phone market in the world. So it's not surprising that although Apple is the third-largest mobile supplier in the world, selling 10 million units in 2008, in Japan the iPhone is selling so poorly it's being offered for free. The country is famous for being ahead of its time when it comes to technology, and the iPhone just doesn't cut it. For example, Japanese handset users are into video and photos — and the iPhone has neither a video camera, multimedia text messaging, nor a TV tuner. Pricing plans in Japan are also very competitive, and the iPhone's $60-and-up monthly plan is too high compared to competitors; a survey lat year showed that among Japanese consumers, 91% didn't want to buy an iPhone. The cellular weapon of choice in Japan would be the Panasonic P905i, a fancy cellphone that doubles as a 3-inch TV and features 3-G, GPS, a 5.1-megapixel camera, and motion sensors for Wii-style games. 'When I show this to visitors from the US, they're amazed,' according to journalist Nobi Hayashi, who adds, 'Carrying around an iPhone in Japan would make you look pretty lame.'"
Censorship

Australian Internet Censorship Plan Torpedoed 308

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the take-that-old-people dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The Australian Government's plan to introduce mandatory internet censorship has been scuttled, following an independent senator's decision to join the Greens and Opposition in blocking any legislation needed to start the scheme. Anti-Gambling Senator Nick Xenophon previously supported the filter because it could also block gambling web sites, but today withdrew support saying 'the more evidence that's come out, the more questions there are on this.' This week surveys found only less than 10% of Australians supported the censorship. Censorship Senator Stephen Conroy has consistently ignored advice from technical experts saying the filters would slow the internet, block legitimate sites, be easily bypassed and fall short of capturing all of the nasty content available online. Conroy expanded the list to block Adult R18+ and X18+ web sites, and this week said it would also block sites depicting drug use, crime, sex, cruelty, violence or 'revolting and abhorrent phenomena' that 'offend against the standards of morality.' Last week an anti-abortion website was added to the blacklist, and Conroy said he was considering expanding the blacklist to 10,000 sites and beyond."

Comment: Re:But should it be that way? (Score 1) 496

by Alpha Whisky (#26980425) Attached to: The Hard Upgrade Path From XP To Vista To Win 7

100Mb!? Really? I don't know what anti-virus you use but I've never seen one use over 10-20Mb.

Right now windows task manager is reporting:
McShield.exe 91,764K
EngineServer.exe 83,660K

And the best of it is, it's the SonicWALL Enforced Client. If this bloated piece of shit doesn't have a little chat with the company firewall to say that everything is tickety boo, all requests for port 80 outside the LAN get redirected to a "you need to install the bloated crap" page. Nice.

Comment: Re:File access (Score 1) 1127

by Alpha Whisky (#26884159) Attached to: Draconian DRM Revealed In Windows 7

Also, I've been running Windows 7 since it was released to beta now and I haven't noticed any problem with the sound quality even whilst running multiple applications - including media player. Are you sure that you don't just have a crappy soundcard/speaker connections?

Did you read the summary? Have you tried a sound recording while playing back? Disclaimer, I haven't tried it either, but then I'm only running the beta in virtualbox.

The Courts

17,000 Downloads Does Not Equal 17,000 Lost Sales 398

Posted by timothy
from the channeling-captain-obvious dept.
Andrew_Rens writes "Ars Technica has a story on a ruling by a US District Judge who rejects claims by the RIAA that the number of infringing downloads amounts to proof of the same number of lost sales. The judge ruled that 'although it is true that someone who copies a digital version of a sound recording has little incentive to purchase the recording through legitimate means, it does not necessarily follow that the downloader would have made a legitimate purchase if the recording had not been available for free.' The ruling concerns the use of the criminal courts to recover alleged losses for downloading through a process known as restitution. The judgement does not directly change how damages are calculated in civil cases."
Sci-Fi

Actor Matt Smith Will Be 11th Doctor Who 330

Posted by kdawson
from the inheritor-of-the-scarf dept.
Jerry Smith was among a large number of readers letting us know that the 11th Doctor Who has been named. It's Matt Smith, 26, who will be the youngest actor to play the time-traveling Doctor. The head of drama at BBC Wales said this about Smith's audition: "It was abundantly clear that he had that 'Doctor-ness' about him. You are either the Doctor or you are not."
Windows

British Royal Navy Submarines Now Run Windows 725

Posted by samzenpus
from the deep-blue-screen dept.
meist3r writes "On his Government blog, Microsoft's Ian McKenzie announced today that the Royal Navy was ahead of schedule for switching their nuclear submarines to a customized Microsoft Windows solution dubbed 'Submarine Command System Next Generation (SMCS NG)' which apparently consists of Windows 2000 network servers and XP workstations. In the article, it is claimed that this decision will save UK taxpayers £22m over the next ten years. The installation of the new system apparently took just 18 days on the HMS Vigilant. According to the BAE Systems press release from 2005, the overall cost of the rollout was £24.5m for all eleven nuclear submarines of the Vanguard, Trafalgar and Swiftsure classes. Talk about staying with the sinking ship."
Businesses

How Do I Manage Seasoned Programmers? 551

Posted by kdawson
from the just-don't-say-mmm-kay dept.
An anonymous reader writes "I have a technology background and worked as a programmer for a few years before slipping over to the dark side. I am now on the business side and have been given responsibility for a small team of Java programmers. While the technology aspect of what my team works on doesn't scare me, I need ideas to make sure the team stays motivated while reporting to me, a business-oriented guy. Perhaps I should mention I am in my early 30s while the majority of the team constitute an older, wiser generation. What advice should I follow to avoid turning into yet another Bill Lumbergh?"
The Almighty Buck

Used Game Market Affecting Price, Quality of New Titles 384

Posted by Soulskill
from the either-that-or-it-doesn't dept.
Gamasutra is running a feature discussing the used game market with various developers and analysts. The point has been raised by many members of the industry that used game sales are hurting developers and publishers even more lately, when they're already beleaguered by rising piracy rates and a struggling economy. Atari executives recently commented that used game sales are "extremely painful," while GameStop's CEO unsurprisingly came out in support of resales. We've recently discussed a few of the ways game designers are considering to limit used game sales. David Braben, chairman of UK-based developer Frontier Development had this to say: "Five years ago, a great game would have sold for a longer period of time than for a bad game — which was essentially our incentive to make great games. But no longer. Now publishers and developers just see revenue the initial few weeks regardless of the game's quality and then gamers start buying used copies which generates money that goes into GameStop's pocket, nobody else's."

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