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Comment: Re:Pay to upgrade their experience to what? (Score 1) 135

by Almahtar (#43382801) Attached to: Dell Offers Ubuntu Option With Alienware Gaming Desktop
You say that as if paid games are somehow better than pirated ones. I've bought plenty of paid games sometimes multiple times each. Each time I end up downloading and playing a cracked version because it wouldn't tell me I couldn't play it if my 'net screwed up or if their DRM scheme somehow screwed up.

The cracked versions are an upgrade, and this coming from a paying customer.

Getting games to work correctly is hard enough without introducing new ways they can fail on purpose that can also fail on accident.

Comment: Re:No 64-bit? (Score 1) 313

by Almahtar (#42919313) Attached to: Valve Officially Launches Steam For Linux
PAE, muthafugga. 32-bit Linux hasn't been limited to 4 gigs of ram for a long time. If you're rocking a processor that's Pentium Pro or newer (I know, pretty hard to find something so powerful nowadays) you're limited to a puny 64 gigs.

Unless you're running Windows: "According to Geoff Chappell, Microsoft limits 32-bit versions of Windows to 4 GB as a matter of its licensing policy" -- from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_Address_Extension

Comment: Re:Whole quote (Score 1) 290

by Almahtar (#41320531) Attached to: Zuckerberg: Betting On HTML5 Was Facebook's Biggest Mistake
Yep! Another fun one: I wasn't happy at all when it decided to update my profile with my phone number, when I'd been making sure to keep my phone number far away from my profile for years. It didn't ask. Thanks, Facebook, for sharing my private information with who knows how many people without asking or warning me. Fuck that app.
DRM

Ubisoft Ditches Always-Online DRM Requirement From PC Games 218

Posted by Soulskill
from the they-can-be-taught dept.
RogueyWon writes "In an interview with gaming site Rock, Paper, Shotgun, Ubisoft has announced that it will no longer use always-online DRM for its PC games. The much-maligned DRM required players to be online and connected to its servers at all times, even when playing single-player content. This represents a reversal of Ubisoft's long-standing insistence that such DRM was essential if the company were to be profitable in the PC gaming market." The full interview has a number of interesting statements. Ubisoft representatives said the decision was made in June of last year. This was right around the time the internet was in an uproar over the DRM in Driver: San Francisco, which Ubisoft quickly scaled back. Ubisoft stopped short of telling RPS they regretted the always-online DRM, or that it only bothers legitimate customers. (However, in a different interview at Gamasutra, Ubisoft's Chris Early said, "The truth of it, they're more inconvenient to our paying customers, so in listening to our players, we removed them.") They maintain that piracy is a financial problem, and acknowledged that the lack of evidence from them and other publishers has only hurt their argument.

Comment: Re:The best part... (Score 1) 441

by Almahtar (#39936351) Attached to: Ubuntu Will Soon Ship On 5% of New PCs
Your post also solves a symptom and not the problem - that most people don't know enough to care about their OS. "Does it facebook?" is the average user's concern.
That's a good thing and a bad thing. It's nice that they usually don't have to care but it does suck that they're oblivious to the fact that they even have options.

Comment: Re:Who can blame them? (Score 1) 649

by Almahtar (#39319333) Attached to: <em>Battleheart</em> Developer Drops Android As 'Unsustainable'
A (literally) mom'n'pop shop is concerned about a few thousand, yes. It's a percentage of their income and it matters - a 2 person shop will definitely miss a couple thousand. Additionally, no they can not get dev hardware with an e-mail. If that was true every 14 year old girl that wants the latest phone could whip up an e-mail pretending to be a successful dev. The only companies that get free dev hardware are large ones. Little shops (less than 20 devs) pay for every transistor.

Who except Apple cares about the behavior of little shops? Uhhh... little shops do...

Comment: Re:A Contract Is What? (Score 1) 467

by Almahtar (#39013795) Attached to: Dealing With an Overly-Restrictive Intellectual Property Policy?
I've worked for a few places that gave me their invention assignment agreements in .doc format. They wanted me to print it, sign it, give it back.
If I'd felt the terms were not reasonable I would have just edited it, signed it, and handed it in without a word. Problem solved.
In my case the terms were reasonable enough so I left them unmodified.
EU

EU Extends Music Copyright to 70 Years 536

Posted by samzenpus
from the what's-another-twenty-years? dept.
MrSteveSD writes "The copyright on sound recordings by the Beatles, Rolling Stones and other famous bands was due to expire in the next few years. However, the EU Council has now scuttled any such hopes. The copyright term has been extended from 50 to 70 years with aging rockers expressing their delight."

IF I HAD A MINE SHAFT, I don't think I would just abandon it. There's got to be a better way. -- Jack Handley, The New Mexican, 1988.

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