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Comment: Re:She has a case (Score 1) 893

by Alekzander (#8344779) Attached to: RIAA Countersued Under Racketeering Laws
You know what? I'm going to agree with you. It is not possible to 'own' information. Neither then, is it possible to 'own' physical property. Like information, it can be in your possession, but is there really any higher power that says, "This is yours"? No, there is not. There is only an understanding among men, which each individual agrees upon. Or sometimes, they will disagree about it or ignore it wholly.

I would like to point out, however, that if information cannot be owned, then it is by nature in the public domain. If it is not possible for an individual to 'own' information, then it is by definition unowned. It cannot be owned by anyone.

Unfortunately unless we are willing to relegate all information into non-existence and not allow anyone to see it, then the information must be considered open for all to see. Withholding all information from everyone is an impossibility, so if information cannot be privately held, then it must be publicly available. If information is publicly available as a rule, then music and television and other 'free' forms of information that you've talked about are indeed in the public domain.

Also, then, because of their lack of physical nature, passwords, financial statements, and a whole host of other sensitive information that most of us would prefer to keep private is then suddenly available to the public by its very nature.

It is information, and therefore, it must be free and unowned.

If another person asks me the PIN number to my credit card, I must give it to him. It is, after all, not mine. I cannot claim ownership of it. Were the courts to agree with this law of free information, I would be legally compelled to give him every piece of information about myself and my life that he wishes. It's a slippery slope that we're on here, if all this is true.

As a side note on the factory concept, you've assumed that we've paid for the owner. To keep the metaphor accurate to what I've been trying to say, we've never paid the factory owner a dime. You haven't paid the music maker, have you? You still have his stuff, however.

Computers are unreliable, but humans are even more unreliable. Any system which depends on human reliability is unreliable. -- Gilb

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