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Comment: Re:Advocates and Proponents only? (Score 1) 132

by Albanach (#46775229) Attached to: Industry-Wide Smartphone "Kill Switch" Closer To Reality

Is it really that difficult to come up with a chip of write once memory, so that when the IMEI is programmed it can never be altered? Better still if it could be incorporated into the CPU or a similar part that would be unfeasibly difficult to remove. Is there any good reason that the IMEI can be reprogrammed?

Comment: Re:"Independent" discovery? (Score 5, Interesting) 62

by Albanach (#46751519) Attached to: Heartbleed Disclosure Timeline Revealed

Not necessarily. It may be that the bug was known to others and that Google and Codenomicon were both monitoring channels used by more nefarious types. Both organizations may have independently 'discovered' the bug after each becoming aware that an exploit existed without having full details of the exploit.

Comment: Scrap librarians too? (Score 1) 32

You'd think that all they do is sell papers, when in fact they collect and organize them.

Anyone that does serious research will have used specialist librarians before. Just because the data is out there and available, doesn't mean you're going to find it. Even if you do find it, it doesn't mean your search was efficient.

Of course the bill has a catchy name - Let Me Google That For You Act - but the author(s) don't understand that their proposal is to shut down The Google, not encourage its use.

Comment: Re:Whatever you may think ... (Score 3, Interesting) 445

by Albanach (#46721859) Attached to: Heartbleed Coder: Bug In OpenSSL Was an Honest Mistake

Well pretty much anyone can start a lawsuit. But what damages are they suing for? Reimbursement of the purchase price?

If you're using it, you're agreeing to the license:

  * THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE OpenSSL PROJECT ``AS IS'' AND ANY
  * EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
  * IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
  * PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE OpenSSL PROJECT OR
  * ITS CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,
  * SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT
  * NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES;
  * LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION)
  * HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT,
  * STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE)
  * ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED
  * OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

Now I am not a lawyer, and there are always folk looking for an opportunity to sue, but the license terms surely set them off on a bad start.

Comment: Re:Airbnb profiting on illegal activity (Score 1, Insightful) 319

by Albanach (#46688921) Attached to: SF Evictions Surging From Crackdown On Airbnb Rentals

Doesn't free enterprise also include the freedom to enter contracts. If your contract with your landlord says you cannot sublet, are you arguing that the contract should be unenforceable?

As for the tax, we rely on a number of services that are paid for through taxes. It's fine to object to the bedroom tax, many hotel owners do. It's less fine to opt out of taxation.

Comment: Re:Chromecast? (Score 1) 117

by Albanach (#46677799) Attached to: The Verge: Google Is Working on a TV Box Of Its Own

Are you sure your sister has a chromecast? As others say, you don't need to keep anything open on your phone or tablet.

It would be different if she was casting a tab from a chrome browser on a laptop, or if you in fact have a Miracast dongle, also supported by Google as a way of streaming, but which would need you to keep the app open. Certainly that can be a pain, but again it's not Chromecast - indeed Chromecast seems designed to solve this major problem of Miracast (or Apple's airplay).

Comment: Re:Hmm. (Score 1) 74

by Albanach (#46567253) Attached to: Google Now Arrives In Chrome For Windows and Mac

Google now incorporates things such as your search history and your emails to provided a customized start page.

So if Google knows you live in Atlanta, GA it will show you the weather for Atlanta. If you have a flight booked to San Francisco, you will also see the weather for your destination and confirmation of whether your flight is on time - this happens automatically if the flight confirmation went to your gmail account.

If you search for an address or store on your desktop computer, Google Now on your phone will be aware of this and will offer directions. If you have an appointment at your Dentist in your Google Calendar, your phone will remind you, letting you know what time you need to leave to arrive on time taking into account current traffic conditions.

Comment: Re:Google Now scares the living (Score 2, Insightful) 74

by Albanach (#46567183) Attached to: Google Now Arrives In Chrome For Windows and Mac

It's a fair point, but at least Google gives you the means to turn this off. Also, you're getting something you can place a value on in return, so you can make a reasoned decision as to whether location services are a price worth paying.

All the same data is, however, still available to the government. And there's no off switch there.

Comment: Re:Flight recorder (Score 1) 491

by Albanach (#46566287) Attached to: How Satellite Company Inmarsat Tracked Down MH370

Well, if you're looking for something that measures perhaps a couple of meters at best, and you're in a plane, high up and traveling at a cruising speed of 400 knots, it's pretty easy to miss something.

If you're in a submarine or a surface ship traveling at about 20 knots, with listening gear that requires you only have to be within 10 miles of the black box to hear its pings, I'd imagine that location process is comparatively straightforward and pretty quick if you can start close enough

Comment: Re: Bad summary (Score 2) 206

Tl;dr : You must be batshit crazy to think that was legitimate without a court order. But hey, MS said so. Must be true then. Facepalm

So, you say they can't do it without a court order, but don't seem to address their statement that they cannot get a court order.

So what exactly is your proposal in these circumstances?

+ - TurboTax sells access to your data->

Submitted by rcharbon
rcharbon (123915) writes "I had the apparently naive expectation that I’d retain some small scrap of privacy by using the TurboTax desktop app instead of the web version. However, their failure to keep a certificate revocation list up to date revealed that Intuit installs third-party cookies from Neustar, an ad service that “provides audience insights that increase online advertising relevancy through the power of verified offline consumer data.”"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re: Three thoughts... (Score 1) 436

by Albanach (#46496565) Attached to: Malaysian Flight Disappearance 'Deliberate'

Okay, so the $100 begin doesn't work. REI have a $300 one that uses iridium with global coverage pour to pole. $50 per month for ten minute location updates.

Even considering the lie data capacity of iridium, I think it could handle ten minute location updates from the few thousand jets in the air at any one time.

"The most important thing in a man is not what he knows, but what he is." -- Narciso Yepes

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