Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Russian Programmer's are Brilliant! (Score 1) 157

by AftanGustur (#47783121) Attached to: Software Error Caused Soyuz/Galileo Failure

I've been hearing all this about the much vaunted chops of these Russian coders, but frankly I don't ever see it.

There is also the possibility that the project was sabotaged by an external actor.

Maybe it is a coincidence but the one who profits the most from this failure is the same as has been working hard during the last 10 years to get rid of the Galileo program and is also the same nation as is known for being the most technically capable in electronic warfare/hacking.

Comment: Beta comment from an old-timer (Score 5, Insightful) 77

by The Qube (#46192881) Attached to: Silk Road's Ross Ulbricht's Next Court Date Set For November

Obviously, I've been around the Internet and around here for a long time: started reading Chips & Dips and continued reading on a daily basis since then (overall, I don't think I missed a single story ever). I even (unknowingly) helped Rob with a Perl problem on comp.lang.perl when he was coding the original Slashdot (received a "Don't Fear the Penguins" T-Shirt when they made it into the big league - I still treasure it).

A couple of years ago, I switched to doing most of my reading on smartphones and tablets. One of the first apps I downloaded for my iPhone was the Slashdot app (I think it was branded by the then owners and included other sister sites) - it sucked though.

Anyway, I continued reading Slashdot daily through the RSS feeds and hardly ever logged on to the website itself. It wasn't just about the stories themselves - I got a lot of news and editorials from other tech sites as well (AllThingsDigital/Re-code, GigaOM sites etc). I loved reading the comments (trolls, shills etc included) and the RSS reader neatly provided the top 5 comments for each story which also enabled me then to drill through into parents, responses etc. Though I've always been more of a lurker, it is those comments that have made it a community that I've felt a part of for the past 17 years. I didn't mind crappy summaries, duplicate stories and other editorial failures - they were a part of Slashdot. About the only thing that I found annoying was the rampant islamophobia/xenophobia that developed over the past 10 years, supported by 1-2 editors, but it was mostly easy to ignore.

I've tried to support Slashdot whichever way I could. I clicked on ads on Slashdot when I wanted to buy something from those regular advertisers (Rackspace, ThinkGeek etc). I didn't even find Slashvertisments annoying as a lot of those introduced me to products and companies that I didn't know about - a good example was a video for Scottevest hoodies, which I've been buying regularly since.

I read some rumblings about Beta in the comments recently and didn't fail to notice :-) a torrent of them over the past week or two, so I decided to check out the Beta site.

The beta site is fundamentally broken! I appreciate where the defensive story yesterday came from and I know that a lot of actual technical bugs with the new site can and will be fixed. The problem though is that the idea behind the new site itself is broken, so whatever is being built is being built on wrong foundations (and feel free to replace "foundations" with "intentions", depending on your level of paranoia about Dice's ownership/plans). The commenting functionality very much feels like an add-on (and it is reflected in the UI design as well) - at which point you may as well just run a Wordpress blog with comments or a commercial web discussion plug-in. The commenting functionality needs to be the foundation that the rest of the Slashdot is built on, not the other way around.

Based on my own experience, I know how these things go and I know that these (and others') comments will be ignored because a lot of effort would have gone into the current Beta site already. Something reasonably functional will eventually emerge, after many iterations and after a lot of effort, but by that time, a lot of users will have been needlessly turned away.

Death by a thousand cuts is sad :-(

Comment: How "open" in OpenStreetmap? (Score 1) 162

by AftanGustur (#45963653) Attached to: Why the World Needs OpenStreetMap
I have seen so many projects that started as "community data gathering" projects and then went commercial and stopped providing free access when some business wanted to buy them.

So just how "Open" is "OpenStreetMap"?

Can I download the data and set up my own server in case OpenStreetmap closes it's free access?

Comment: The PC market has driven development (Score 2) 393

by AftanGustur (#45583803) Attached to: IDC: PC Shipments Decline Worse Than Forecasted, No Recovery Expected
This is sad news. the PC market has so far been the one who has driven development and innovation.

Want a bigger disk? Buy a bigger disk and put it in your PC!
Want more memory? Buy more memory and put it in your PC!
Want a faster CPU? Buy a faster CPU and put it in your PC!
Want a faster GPU to play games? Buy a faster graphics card and put it in your PC!

The rest of the market, phones, tablets and consoles is all "consumer packaged components" which are not replaceable or upgradeable.

The whole AMD/Intel war would not have happenbed without the PC.

Comment: The evolution of IT (Score 1) 465

by AftanGustur (#45553205) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Why Are Tech Job Requirements So Specific?
For the last 5-8 years there has been an ever increasing pressure on companies to "do more with less", "document operations" and "create procedures", i.e. to "streamline" all the "cost" centers of the organisation. IT is generally viewed as a "cost center" That is: costs money and does not create any output for the company.

This has led to a mindset where the whole of IT has been defined in terms of "projects" with inputs and outputs and companies want to "buy talent instead of careers" meaning that the company wants your work but not you as a person.

This has then led to companies running most things on "temporary staff" like consultants and contractors.

The effect this has had on IT is that knowledge about the infrastructure, systems, their quirks and how everything works together is not retained in the company and IT operations down to the little details are defined by non-IT people who think in terms of "procedures" "inputs" and "outputs".

So when you see something like "System administrator wanted, has to know XYZ operating system version 10,04 LTR, and the systems HPBS and VLSN" you can be sure that this requirement was written by a non-it person who thinks in terms of "inputs" to a problem.

Comment: Re:Willful or knowing violations (Score 5, Interesting) 165

by AftanGustur (#45253903) Attached to: NSA Chief Keith Alexander Takes His PRISM Pitch To YouTube

So, just involuntary and ignorant violations, then.

I see what you did here and more people should be doing this, listen to what words he uses and then think, "why is he using these words and could he be trying to sidestep the truth with the use of selected words."

Because that's that he is doing!

"The Amiga is the only personal computer where you can run a multitasking operating system and get realtime performance, out of the box." -- Peter da Silva

Working...