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Comment: Re:How is this a FB problem? (Score 2) 100

by AffidavitDonda (#36680482) Attached to: Germany Considers Banning Wild Facebook Parties
Yes, 5,000 would be a problem. The police wouldn't be prepared for that. They would have to call in reinforcements from other towns first. Even 500 people drunk enough could become dangerous if the situation gets out of control.
The bill in this case would be the taxpayers burden in Germany. That's what we pay taxes for (one reason), the police protecting our health and property. They could try to get some money back from the illegal party goers. At least those who don't follow police orders to leave the place. The police can give this kind of order. In case of public danger they can tell you to leave a certain area.

But the main point here is, that the call for a new law is just utter nonsense. We have enough laws to cope with such situations. There where illegal parties long before facebook and nobody asked for new laws. If such events didn't run out of control, nobody cared. If they did, most likely somebody called the police and they handled the situation depending on actual events and based on existing laws.

Comment: Re:How is this a FB problem? (Score 1) 100

by AffidavitDonda (#36680068) Attached to: Germany Considers Banning Wild Facebook Parties
Actually you have the option to allow somebody to enter your private property or to send him away (and call the police if he doesn't go). Even if you invited him. The few events I remember where parties really went mad was, when parents let have the kids the house (or where away for other reasons) and the kids simply lost control. Anyway: As pointed out by Asic Eng, around this time of the year we have to cope with less popular politicians using the opportunity to get media attention.

+ - Fermi Lab May Have Not Discovered New Particle->

Submitted by Dainutehvs
Dainutehvs (936606) writes "Do You remember article in slashdot "Fermi Lab May Have Discovered New Particle or Force" and quite a few slashdotters being skeptical aout it. They might be right. Another team has analysed data from the collider and come to the exact opposite conclusion about whether it hints at a new particle. Read more in NewScientist's website http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20564"
Link to Original Source

+ - How journalists data-mined the Wikileaks docs->

Submitted by meckdevil
meckdevil (1713054) writes "Associated Press developer-journalist extraordinaire Jonathan Stray gives a brilliant explanation of the use of data-mining strategies to winnow and wring journalistic sense out of massive numbers of documents, using the Iraq and Afghanistan war logs released by Wikileaks as a case in point. The concepts for focusing on certain groups of documents and ignoring others are hardly new; they underlie the algorithms used by the major Web search engines. Their use in a journalistic context is on a cutting edge, though, and it raises a fascinating quandary: By choosing the parameters under which documents will be considered similar enough to pay attention to, journalist-programmers actually choose the frame in which a story will be told. This type of data mining holds great potential for investigative revelation — and great potential for journalistic abuse."
Link to Original Source
Apple

+ - Apple Store Employee Attempts To Form Union->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Cory Moll, a part-time employee at an Apple store in San Francisco, is attempting unionize Apple store employees. The Apple Retail Workers Union is an attempt to fight for better wages and benefits and to address what he says are unfair practices in the company's glass-and-steel retail showrooms. "The core issues are definitely involve compensation, pay, benefits," said Mr. Moll, who has received little public support from employees so far, though he said he has emails expressing support. An Apple representative confirmed Mr. Moll is an employee, but declined to comment on the union effort."
Link to Original Source

+ - researchers find wood-digesting enzyme in bacteria->

Submitted by AffidavitDonda
AffidavitDonda (1736752) writes "University of Warwick researchers have identified an enzyme in bacteria which could be used to make biofuel production more efficient by making sustainable sources of biofuels, such as woody plants and the inedible parts of crops, more economically viable.

The researchers identified the gene for breaking down lignin in a soil-living bacterium called Rhodococcus jostii. Although such enzymes have been found before in fungi, this is the first time that they have been identified in bacteria. The bacterium’s genome has already been sequenced which means that it could be modified more easily to produce large amounts of the required enzyme. In addition, bacteria are quick and easy to grow, so this research raises the prospect of producing enzymes which can break down lignin on an industrial scale.

By making woody plants and the inedible by-products of crops economically viable the eventual hope is to be able to produce biofuels that don’t compete with food production."

Link to Original Source
IBM

+ - IBM builds first graphene integrated circuit->

Submitted by AffidavitDonda
AffidavitDonda (1736752) writes "IBM researchers have built the first integrated circuit (IC) based on a graphene transistor.

The circuit, built on a wafer of silicon carbide, consists of field-effect transistors (FETs) made of graphene. The IC also includes metallic structures, such as on-chip inductors and the transistors' sources and drains.

The circuit the team built is a broadband radio-frequency mixer, a fundamental component of radios that processes signals by finding the difference between two high-frequency wavelengths."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:So slashdotters (Score 1) 293

by AffidavitDonda (#36019752) Attached to: An IP Address Does Not Point To a Person, Judge Rules

Maybe that's right. But police, once they have the address, has more option than blindly raiding the house. They could scan the network and see from where it's used and maybe even intercept the packages.

That would mean one more step for the police. And anyway, the main question was, if it's making police work impossible, what it doesn't, since police with evidence that a certain IP was clearly used for criminal activity would get the address and other data necessary to carry on their work.

Comment: Re:So slashdotters (Score 1) 293

by AffidavitDonda (#36016590) Attached to: An IP Address Does Not Point To a Person, Judge Rules

I don't think this ruling applies to normal police work.

from the order:

"the imprimatur of this court will not be used toadvance a “fishing expedition by means of a perversion of the purpose and intent” of classactions."

The police can still get the address of the suspect and than do some their job by observation to collect evidence. I think if they can proof, that the suspect is at home every time the IP was used for some criminal activity, this would be enough.

+ - Judge rules: ISP does not point to person->

Submitted by AffidavitDonda
AffidavitDonda (1736752) writes "A possible landmark ruling in one of the mass-BitTorrent lawsuits in the U.S. may spell the end of the “pay-up-or-else-schemes” that have targeted over 100,000 Internet users in the last year. District Court Judge Harold Baker has denied a copyright holder the right to subpoena the ISPs of alleged copyright infringers.

Among other things Judge Baker cited a recent child porn case where the U.S. authorities raided the wrong people, because the real offenders were piggybacking on their Wi-Fi connections. Using this example, the judge claims that several of the defendants in VPR’s case may have nothing to do with the alleged offense either.

From the judges order:

"IP subscribers are not necessarily copyright infringers."

"Where an IP address might actually identify an individual subscriber and address the correlation is still far from perfect, as illustrated in the MSNBC article. The infringer might be the subscriber, someone in the subscriber’s household, a visitorwith her laptop, a neighbor, or someone parked on the street at any given moment."

"The imprimatur of this court will not be used to advance a “fishing expedition" by means of a perversion of the purpose and intent” of class actions.""

Link to Original Source

+ - Judge rules: ISP is not a person-> 3

Submitted by AffidavitDonda
AffidavitDonda (1736752) writes "A possible landmark ruling in one of the mass-BitTorrent lawsuits in the U.S. may spell the end of the “pay-up-or-else-schemes” that have targeted over 100,000 Internet users in the last year. District Court Judge Harold Baker has denied a copyright holder the right to subpoena the ISPs of alleged copyright infringers, because an IP-address does not equal a person.

Among other things Judge Baker cited a recent child porn case where the U.S. authorities raided the wrong people, because the real offenders were piggybacking on their Wi-Fi connections. Using this example, the judge claims that several of the defendants in VPR’s case may have nothing to do with the alleged offense either."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:kind of like religion (Score 3, Insightful) 869

by AffidavitDonda (#36008974) Attached to: The Internet's New Alternate Reality

While "explaining the unexplained" may be a reason for some people to believe in god, in my opinion that is a minority. Most deeply religious people don't care about the "unexplained" and wouldn't even come up with any of the questions that where driving science and modern society for centuries.

Most religious people simply seek a omnipotent protecting father figure that shields them against plain everyday peril and distress. Something where they can take refuge in cases of illness or poverty. And something that gives them the hope, that they may see again those who they have lost in some "paradise" after death.

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