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Feed Techdirt: Universal Music Execs Finally Recognizing That It Needs To Make Its Money On Com (techdirt.com)

The press and various tech blogs have had something of a field day with the news of Vivendi's CEO, Jean-Bernard Levy, calling Apple's iTunes' contract "indecent." Vivendi, of course, owns Universal Music, a company that has been rather aggressive in trying to squeeze money out of just about everyone while searching for new business models. However, reader Cannen writes in to point out that, while the "indecent" quote is getting all the headlines, there's a much more interesting quote buried further down in the article. Levy then is talking about Universal Music's plans to make money, and there are a few very interesting quotes:

Fleshing out UMG's strategy, Levy said it planned to focus on better exploiting the "monetization of an artist's image" which included branded clothes and TV shows. "This is what we hope will revive our business," Levy said. "People indulge in piracy but spend a lot of money on many other things that are linked to an artist." Levy forecast that "in the not so distant future", traditional music products such as DVDs and CDs would make up less than 50 percent of music publishing revenues.
That sounds shockingly similar to what some of us have been advocating for about a decade -- which had record industry insiders telling us we didn't understand their business at all. Of course, it's not all the way there. What's missing is the realization that if you stop thinking of it as "piracy" and start thinking of it as "promotion" then you want people to share the content, recognizing that it will spread further, creating more fans with more interest in buying all those other things linked to the artist. Of course, if any of the record labels want to get a better idea of how to do this, they should contact us. We could have helped them avoid much of the mess of the past ten years. There's still time to make sure that the next ten aren't even worse.

Submission + - Bioshock cracked

An anonymous reader writes: In less than a week after the official release first fully-working cracks for popular Bioshock game are circulating in torrent communities. Most effective of cracks completely removes any need for any serial number, registration, or even the presence of the internet connection.

One can't help but ponder did the money poured into the protection scheme, support for the said protection scheme, and backslash caused by inconveniencing users accomplish any of the goals they were aiming for. I myself will be enjoying this title the way God intended — without anyone watching over me, and without my game calling home every 10 seconds.
Wireless Networking

Submission + - "Free" wireless broadband sparks "free (pressesc.com)

Enormous Coward writes: "A company that wants to offer "free" filtered Internet over unused TV spectrum band has hit back at criticism that its service is "free as in beer" but not "free as in speech". M2Z Networks (M2Z) today announced that in just the past 15 working days over 1,000 individuals from forty-nine states have written to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) supporting M2Z's pending application. Public Interest Spectrum Coalition (PISC) opposes the application on the grounds that, although M2Z's application could provide significant benefits to the American people, "the proposed license conditions do not adequately ensure that M2Z would operate under open device rules or network neutrality rules of sufficient stringency to confer the full benefits of innovation and free expression to the public.""

Submission + - The Really Fair Scheduler (kerneltrap.org)

derrida writes: "During the many threads discussing Ingo Molnar's recently merged Completely Fair Scheduler, Roman Zippel has repeatedly questioned the complexity of the new process scheduler. In a recent posting to the Linux Kernel mailing list he offered a simpler scheduler named the 'Really Fair Scheduler' saying, "as I already tried to explain previously CFS has a considerable algorithmic and computational complexity. This patch should now make it clearer, why I could so easily skip over Ingo's long explanation of all the tricks CFS uses to keep the computational overhead low — I simply don't need them.""

Submission + - Theo de Raadt Explains License Modification (undeadly.org)

Ray Lai writes: "Theo de Raadt explains the legal ramifications of changing code licenses:

It is illegal to modify a license unless you are the owner/author, because it is a legal document. If there are multiple owners/authors, they must all agree. A person who receives the file under two licenses can use the file in either way.... but if they distribute the file (modified or unmodified!), they must distribute it with the existing license intact, because the licenses we all use have statements which say that the license may not be removed.

Every cloud has a silver lining; you should have sold it, and bought titanium.