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Comment: Re:But to really propel Russia Today to the fore.. (Score 2) 254

by AdmiralXyz (#44557867) Attached to: Russia Today: Vladimir Putin's Weapon In 'The War of Images'

You will rarely if ever hear one of those outlets cast a critical eye towards liberal policies. They are are just as biased left as fox is biased right.

You might try looking at the networks' coverage of Snowden to see how wrong this is. "Liberal" MSNBC and NPR (can't speak for the others) have actually been mostly neutral, sometimes supportive, toward him; Fox is the one insisting he's a traitor or bringing on Washington talking heads who do.

But no, don't do anything drastic like examine your beliefs. Just keep it up with the "both sides are equally bad" meme, but actually requires no critical thought whatsoever.

Bitcoin

Bitcoin Exchange Mt. Gox Halts USD Withdrawals 173

Posted by Soulskill
from the keep-your-eye-on-the-other-shoe dept.
hypnosec writes "World's largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, has halted U.S. dollar withdrawals of customer funds in the U.S., citing a need for system improvements. According to Mt. Gox, the exchange has experienced a huge number of requests for deposits as well as withdrawals from both established markets and new markets, following which its bank hasn't been able to process transactions on time. This led to difficulties for its overseas clients, especially those in the U.S. The exchange said that the deposits in USD, transfers to Mt. Gox, and deposits and withdrawals in other currencies will remain unaffected during this period. Mt. Gox will be resuming the USD withdrawals for its U.S. clients once the improvement of its systems is complete." Wired suggests the slowness may be due in part to reluctance from banks to get entwined with Bitcoin for a number of reasons. "The problem is that U.S. banks are afraid that doing business with Bitcoin companies might draw the attention of U.S. or state regulators ... This reluctance may be fed by the sense that Bitcoin poses a threat to the banking industry. Anyone can transfer Bitcoins anywhere for free and that could put a dent in some banking transaction processing fees."

Comment: Re:If the policy makers astually traded (Score 1) 476

by AdmiralXyz (#44040065) Attached to: Have We Hit Peak HFT?

Person A: The government ought to regulate [X], because [reason].
Person B: You idiot, do you also want the government to regulate [something completely unrelated to X where [reason] does not apply]?

Is there a name for this specific argument? It's straw-manning I guess, but I see it often enough that it deserves to have its own name.

Comment: Re:Last Sentence (Score 1) 322

It brings encryption keys to pretty much the same status as locked safes. The government can't just order you to open it on a whim, but they can if they have reasonable prior evidence that there is illegal material contained within. To illustrate:

Scenario 1: As a citizen, I step off the plane after getting back from a foreign country. Not knowing who I am, ICE goons randomly pull me aside and order me to give up the encryption key to my laptop. They have NO reasonable suspicion that doing so will yield illicit material or evidence of wrongdoing, so the Fifth Amendment applies.

Scenario 2: I'm a corporate officer cooking my books, and I brag to my friend that the feds will never catch me because all the incriminating evidence is encrypted. Unfortunately my friend has agreed to cooperate in a plea deal, and relays the details of this conversation. Now the government has reasonable suspicion (actually, at this point I think it's probable cause) that my encryption key is concealing material evidence, and they can probably force me to reveal it.

/. probably won't be happy with that last sentence, but IMO as long as judges interpret "reasonable suspicion" correctly (which is usually the case), it's probably the right call. The government always has been able to force you to open your safe deposit box if they have a warrant, after all. This is nothing new.
Television

Futurama Cancelled (Again) 390

Posted by samzenpus
from the bye-bye-bender dept.
eldavojohn writes "Bad news everybody. According to Entertainment Weekly, Futurama has been cancelled (again). The renewal of Futurama back onto television was met with great fanfare but sadly it appears that Futurama's luck has run out for a second time. The second half of season 7 will air from June 19th to September 4th and that will be it."

Comment: Re:WTF? (Score 5, Insightful) 416

by AdmiralXyz (#43488535) Attached to: FBI Releases Boston Bombing Suspect Images/Videos
No, idiot, they're asking people who were in Boston on Monday taking pictures with their smartphones to look through their photos again. Chances are lots of people inadvertently got photos of the guys, and some of those might be clear enough for identification (as opposed to the crummy security cam footage).
Privacy

+ - Twitter-shaming can cost you your job - whether you're giving or receiving->

Submitted by
tsamsoniw
tsamsoniw writes "Hoping to strike a blow against sexism in the tech industry, developer and tech evangelist Adria Richards took to Twitter to complain about two male developers swapping purportedly offensive jokes at PyCon. The decision has set into motion a chain of events that illustrate the impact a tweet or two can make in this age of social networking: One the developers and Richards have since lost their jobs, and even the chair of PyCon has been harassed for his minor role in the incident."
Link to Original Source
Education

Raspberry Pi's Eben Upton: "Programming Will Make You a Better Doctor" 79

Posted by samzenpus
from the learning-the-bits dept.
cylonlover writes "After a handful of days of furtive suggestion, spring made its presence felt in London today, where the second Technology Frontiers conference got underway. The Economist-organized event sees leading technologists and cultural figures take to the podium in front of some 250 ideas-thirsty business persons. Among them was Raspberry Pi Foundation founder Eben Upton, who extolled the benefits of learning to program for all professions. He went into some detail as to the inception of the Raspberry Pi and the need for more computer programmers."
Blackberry

RIM's BB10 Campaign Requires Some Serious Work 171

Posted by Soulskill
from the market-share-is-for-closers dept.
adeelarshad82 writes "With the BlackBerry 10 launch just around the corner, there is a lot of pressure on RIM's CEO to provide a 'Steve Jobs Moment.' However, given BlackBerry's 1.1% percent market share compared to the combined 92% share between rivals Android and iOS, it's a long road back. To add to the struggle, no other first-generation smartphone leader has been able to pull off this kind of rebirth. Palm and Symbian are dead and Microsoft is struggling. But, as one mobile analyst explains, RIM has a chance to carve out its own market with tomorrow's launch of BlackBerry 10 given that they get a few things right. They need to heavily promote their devices to CEOs, heavily promote the top apps to users, and most of all, they need to be able to explain why people should give it a look."
Microsoft

Does Microsoft Have the Best App Store For Open Source Developers? 339

Posted by timothy
from the so-how-does-that-beat-android? dept.
WebMink writes "Microsoft seems to have been in combat against the GNU GPL throughout the history of free and open source software. But that may be changing. They have recently updated the terms of use for software developers in their Windows Phone app store to allow any OSI-approved open source license — even the GPL. They include extraordinarily broad language that gives the open source license priority over their own license terms, saying: 'If your Application or In-App Product includes FOSS, your license terms may conflict with the limitations set forth in Section 3 of the Standard Application License Terms, but only to the extent required by the FOSS that you use.' Could it be that the most open source friendly app stores will be the ones run my Microsoft?"
Google

Schmidt On Why Tax Avoidance is Good, Robot Workers, and Google Fiber 780

Posted by samzenpus
from the thats-a-lot-for-one-day dept.
Bruce66423 writes "Eric Schmidt said that a £2.5 billion tax avoidance 'is called capitalism' and seems totally unrepentant. He added, 'I am very proud of the structure that we set up. We did it based on the incentives that the governments offered us to operate.' One must admit to being impressed by his honesty." Schmidt also says that if you want a job in the future you'll have to learn to "outrace the robots," and that Google Fiber is the most interesting project they have going.

"Your attitude determines your attitude." -- Zig Ziglar, self-improvement doofus

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