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Comment: Re:Shows how little you understand about money (Score 1) 103

by AdamWeeden (#37458998) Attached to: <em>DC Universe Online</em> Goes F2P

The credit card companies don't like this of course and in fact the agreement that merchants sign with Visa and MasterCard specifically prohibit them from setting a minimum transaction amount. Theoretically if enough people complained Visa could cut the merchant off.

That used to be the case, but not anymore.

Comment: Re:User feedback is overrated (Score 3, Interesting) 71

by AdamWeeden (#36461932) Attached to: New Technique To Help Develop MMORPG Content?

Another way to reward players is to let them feel that they're really having an impact in changing their world -- that they've modified something that others will experience in a durable manner.

This is one thing that always brings me back to A Tale In The Desert. It's not the prettiest game in the world, and can definitely be awkward at times, but it's unique in it's mutability. For those unfamiliar, every aspect of the game is democratic. Don't like something? Then write a law and attempt to convince others to pass it. For example: a resource that is needed for certain recipes is cactus sap. To get this cactus sap you have to cut the cactus and wait for it to come out after a few minutes. Common courtesy is that, when done, you cut the cactus for the next person to make their time shorter. Someone decided there ought to be a law that when you collect sap, you auto cut the cactus. This saves you clicks (1 click to cut and collect vs. 2) and it means there will always be sap for the next person. Everyone loved the idea, it was passed into law, and the developer implemented it. It's a beautiful system.

Comment: Re:Am I really supposed to care? (Score 1) 292

by AdamWeeden (#36311888) Attached to: DC Reboots Universe

If I want a story, I'll read a book or watch a movie. I can't make myself care about a story crammed into tiny speech bubbles and narrator boxes.

Completely agree. I have given comics a shot numerous times, especially with what is considered by many to be the best of the best: Sandman and Watchmen. Don't get me wrong, it's not that they were horrible; I just think they could have been done so much better (in terms of story) in a true novel form. Since I like the art as well, just throw in some images every few pages, and voila, best of both worlds IMHO. This is not to say that anyone who likes comics is stupid. My tastes are not your tastes. To each their own.

+ - Can You Copyright A Tattoo?-> 2

Submitted by AdamWeeden
AdamWeeden (678591) writes "The great economists over at the Freakonomics blog are asking a very interesting question: can you copyright a tattoo?

Last week, Victor Whitmill, the tattoo artist who inked [Mike] Tyson, filed suit against Warner Brothers, claiming they had infringed his copyright in Tyson'(TM)s tattoo. Which raises an interesting question: Can you copyright a tattoo? And if so, who owns it: the artist, or the person who has it on his skin? And what happens when it appears in a film?

This also poses interesting questions of "How far is too far when it comes to copyright?""
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:You fu$$ing what? (Score 1) 218

by AdamWeeden (#35657212) Attached to: Should Smartphones Be Allowed In Court?

There's the old adage to the effect of "I'd rather X guilty men go free than imprison a single innocent one". Is this lost on people these days?

In my experience, yes. I was having a discussion with someone the other day on the merits and detriments of capital punishment. I brought up this adage and they honestly said they didn't care how many innocent people we sent to jail as long as we caught all the guilty ones.

Real programmers don't bring brown-bag lunches. If the vending machine doesn't sell it, they don't eat it. Vending machines don't sell quiche.

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