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Comment: Re:Garbage In (Score 1) 217

by Actually, I do RTFA (#47416471) Attached to: Avast Buys 20 Used Phones, Recovers 40,000 Deleted Photos

That seems like a non-sequitur. The GGP was saying it's not Android's fault that bundling was abused - I was saying that it was because it was the predictable way, in fact the only predictable way, it would be used. The feature was added to be abused.

That's not saying Android is never to be used, or that there are not better and worse implementations. But it is calling them out that this one feature has no redeeming (to the customer) use.

Comment: Re:Garbage In (Score 0, Flamebait) 217

by Actually, I do RTFA (#47413331) Attached to: Avast Buys 20 Used Phones, Recovers 40,000 Deleted Photos

but it's not Android's fault that someone got greedy.

Yes, it is.

Or rather, it's Google's fault because it let them.

Look, if this was an unforeseen action by a third-party, I would agree with you. But it was obvious that this was going to happen if Google enabled bundling software. They did, so they are just as much at fault as the assholes who do it.

In fact, Google intentionally enabled bundling as a service to those assholes, to encourage them to get Android phones out there.

Comment: Re:real vs pretend (Score 2) 343

by Actually, I do RTFA (#47413229) Attached to: Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies

"The government scares me less because they don't want to maximize the money they get from me."

What country do you live in, I want to move where you live because here in the USA the government thinks all money is theirs unless deemed otherwise.

In the US.

There's a fairly trivial proof that I am correct. See, the government has an army, a police force, the ability to have banks reassign/lock my accounts, and the ability to just print quintiillion dollar bills* and inflate my cash to nothing. They can have everything I own right now if they decide to, and I could not stop them.

But wait, I have stuff!

On the other hand, a publicly held company, given similar power over me, would take everything I have, and then brag about how they were increasing shareholder value. Hell, they may even claim that it was their ethical obligation to leave me with nothing.

And the historical record reflects that.

Comment: Re:real vs pretend (Score 1) 343

by Actually, I do RTFA (#47413205) Attached to: Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies

i>In theory, I have far more control over my government than my insurers.

You can change Insurers, but not really your Government.

So, you're one of those people who believes you can jump straight to a "free market solves all problems" in insurance? A field that both has incredible scale effects leading to a natural oligarchy and, by necessity, is highly regulated? Both of which lead to incredible barriers to entry.

Further, there is little reason for any insurance company to deny themselves this information. First, they seek an advertising, not informational advantage: they all use similar/identical algorithms from the same consultants already. Secondly, in addition to whatever you can gain from serving low-risk individuals who object to monitoring in the pool, would be more than offset by the adverse selection pressure that pushes all high risk candidates into that pool.

Lastly, while I questioned the free market claims, that was a precursor to saying that you are free to emigrate. But unlike a company, where your only choice is to patronize them or not (or there is no choice if you want to drive a car/survive an illness/etc. except for among near identical actors), in the case of a democracy, you can actively work to change things. I'd be hard pressed to find a boycott that worked "well", where I will define "well" as achieving a tangential goal in a timely way through the loss of income to the company. I distinguish this from modifying policies to avoid bad press by a boycott being published, to boost shareholder value by increasing intangible assets, etc. However, I can indeed point to many changes made to a democratic country because some group decided they cared about it.

Comment: Re:real vs pretend (Score 2) 343

by Actually, I do RTFA (#47408697) Attached to: Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies

It's OK when the government actually does this, but it's BAD when slashdot pretends the private sector is doing it.

I tend to agree with your statement, absent the sarcasm.

The government scares me less because they don't want to maximize the money they get from me. In theory, I have far more control over my government than my insurers. Certainly I have more oversight, and there are laws governing what the government can do with my information. Private companies don't have the same restrictions, and even if they did they have limited liability, an army of lawyers, and my only recourse will be to get $1.28 in a class action lawsuit. And if the government wants to trump up charges against me, I cannot believe that would be aided much by knowing more about me. But the private sector wants to ring every penny they can from my wallet.

Bottom line, hell yes the

Comment: Re:A win for freedom (Score 1) 1308

The larger companies tend to be paternalistic.

The larger companies tend to make giant all-employees deals. That's why they didn't let you opt out. It would ruin their bulk-discount terms. It also benefits their employees because they get insurance much cheaper .

That said, I've always had the option of cash instead of benefits.

Comment: Re:REST + pure HTML5/JS frontend (Score 1) 532

Google Analytics lets the websites you use...

And Google do the same. Don't get me wrong, we use Google Analytics on our site as well. But I still don't get the benefit to me.

Ads pay for the websites

That may be true. But if so, companies need to start running QA on the ads they serve. I don't like animation, sounds or drive-by installers.

. If no-one used Google Analytics or viewed ads, they would have fewer sites to use, and the sites they could use wouldn't be improved based on their users' habits. They would have confusing navigation, and the users' flow between pages of interest would be convoluted, making the sites harder to use.

I would contend they would have better navigation - at least for me. So many people who think like me turned off any extraneous connection to Google - including Analytics - years ago, so that the people now "voting" are not representative of me or my use habits. Hence, among other things, the new /. Beta.

Nor would my singular action produce enough of an effect to warrant the cost to me of Google developing a more complete profile.

If you want to go back to the internet of the late 90s, fine - but to be ignorant of the benefits is just being lazy.

Still, haven't heard any benefits for me to participate.

But yeah, speed aside, I'm not sure why people hate on the early 00's internet. It had great things like a separation of form and function.

But the things you're thinking about definately came later.

Comment: Re:REST + pure HTML5/JS frontend (Score 1) 532

I'm confused. Your suggestion to "what web language should I use" is to tell him to choose any JS framework (without helping him) because it's uncool for the server to actually do server work? Expecting my computer to do the work you should be doing... well, that's a non-starter.

Bottom line, I don't trust JS blindly, and don't understand why other people do. But then again, I never get why people let google-analytics track them, or ads display either.

Comment: Re:Surgeon General's warning. (Score 1) 532

by Actually, I do RTFA (#47356291) Attached to: NYC Loses Appeal To Ban Large Sugary Drinks

Ultimately, smoking restrictions came about due to the extreme discourtesy of some smokers.

Added that. But of course, we have anti-beating laws because of the extreme discourtesy of some stronger people; anti-embezzling laws because of the extreme discourtesy of some accountants; etc.

Comment: Re:Detroit calls Google arrogant? (Score 1) 236

by Actually, I do RTFA (#47356167) Attached to: Google, Detroit Split On Autonomous Cars

let me just ask if you can name another company that went from nothing to hundreds of millions of daily users in little more than a decade.

Well, first, I'd contend that its an unfair challenge. Absolute numbers ignores population growth. And "daily users" as well as rapid spread both ignore the advantages that software have in unit cost and usage patterns. But even given that, it's kinda trivial to find enough companies that meet your challenge that I have to cull them to get around Slashdot's lameness filter.

  • What's App
  • Twitter
  • Instagram
  • Snapchat
  • Facebook
  • Mozilla
  • Opera

Break included for lameness filter.

  • Macromedia
  • Microsoft
  • Dell
  • Apple
  • Amazon

Break included for lameness filter.

  • Wikipedia
  • Reddit
  • Skype

And that's just new companies. If we count what happens once a company decides to start a new division or pivot to a new space... well..

Comment: Re:Let them drink! (Score 1) 532

by Actually, I do RTFA (#47355939) Attached to: NYC Loses Appeal To Ban Large Sugary Drinks

burden on the system is an excuse. They see smoking as detrimental to their health, so they want to tax people to discourage them from engaging in the activity.

Good, I'm glad its an incentivization because if it was some lame ass attempt to remove the concept of pooled risk, that would suck.

That is, I think discouraging people from smoking, for their own benefit, treating them as valuable, that works. But trying to recoup costs doesn't make sense for a government to try to do.

Never underestimate the bandwidth of a station wagon full of tapes. -- Dr. Warren Jackson, Director, UTCS

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