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Comment: Physical access? (Score 0) 272

by AK Dave (#36851700) Attached to: Apple Laptops Vulnerable To Battery Firmware Hack

Doesn't this exploit require physical access to the actual battery?

On top of that, according to the actual article, any potential malware installed on the battery itself would then need a separate vulnerability in the OS itself in order to do anything. In other words, malware on the battery isn't going to exploit the OS by itself. It isn't going to hijack the bootloader.

But it all goes back to the original problem: the bad guy has to gain physical access to your battery. Which means getting hold of the Macbook, tearing it down, and then what the heck just installing some code on the battery?

Somehow, I'm really not threatened by this.

Comment: Reminiscing about Borders (Score 0) 443

by AK Dave (#36815456) Attached to: Borders Books, Dead At 40

I really liked Borders. At least, I did at first. I was excited when they opened a "big box" bookstore in my town, but that was a good 15-20 years ago. They were a "big thing" back then. We'd had a couple of small Waldenbooks mall stores, but the Borders standalone store was so much bigger and seemed to have such a wider selection of, well, everything. They had magazines I had seen occasionally when I'd visit a big book store elsewhere, with the convenience of being "right here". It was clean, but the store wasn't that convenient. It was awkwardly located and I had to plan my trips well or the lot was too much hassle. As it was located, it was easier to hit the mall first and Borders last, so it was easier to burn any spendable money before I made it to Borders.

Best Buy opened right across the street, attached to the mall, and easier to access. Street traffic got crazy congested nearby, making Borders all the more in-accessible. Plus, even Best Buy was beating Borders on prices for music.

There was a golden time for Borders when all the Waldenbooks locations closed up and the small bookstores in town, except for one big used bookstore, closed up. Then came Barnes & Noble with an even bigger store, a better location, more parking, and a much better selection. Then came Amazon. Then the used bookstore moved, expanded, and parking became so much easier. Borders quickly became the LAST place that I would go to find a book, and then the place that I would NEVER go.

I like to browse books, so Amazon isn't my favorite - even though I do have a Kindle. I like to browse B&N to see what is new. I like to browse used books too. Then its a choice: do I want a hardback on my bookshelf, do I want an e-book on my Kindle, or do I want both. If I want to read it NOW and "collect" it later on the shelf, I'll buy it on the Kindle and then shop for it as a used hardback later. Thats cheaper and more convenient than buying it as a hardback. If I want the hardback, do I get it from Amazon or B&N? Who has the better deal?

Borders seemed to go downhill over the last decade. B&N had better customer service and a friendlier atmosphere. The shelves at Borders seemed poorly stocked by buyers who didn't seem to care about what they were putting out. I could pick a random technical subject, and it would be hit or miss at Borders: either a wide selection of craptastic books, or nothing at all. B&N might have what I was looking for, but if not then at least the shelves would suggest that they MIGHT have had it. Either one could order it for me, but if I'm going to wait for a book I may as well order it from Amazon.

The only good thing about Borders is the way their magazine section was organized with big long wooden magazine racks in parallel rows making it easier to browse without buying. B&N, in contrast, organized all of their magazines along a big wall in a well-lit zone making it easier to find a magazine, but less convenient to casually browse it.

Internet Explorer

Major IE8 Flaw Makes "Safe" Sites Unsafe 83

Posted by kdawson
from the keep-your-scripts-to-yourself dept.
After this weekend's report of a dangerous flaw in IE (which Microsoft confirmed today), intrudere points out an exclusive report in The Register on a new hole in IE8 that could allow an attacker to pull off cross-site scripting attacks on Web sites that ought, by rights, to be safe from XSS. This is according to two anonymous sources, who told El Reg that Microsoft had been notified of the vulnerability a few months ago.
Space

New Theory of Gravity Decouples Space & Time 575

Posted by kdawson
from the paging-hal-clement dept.
eldavojohn writes "Petr Horava, a physicist at the University of California in Berkeley, has a new theory about gravity and spacetime. At high energies, it actually snips any ties between space and time, yet at low energies devolves to equivalence with the theory of General Relativity, which binds them together. The theory is gaining popularity with physicists because it fits some observations better than Einstein's or Newton's solutions. It better predicts the movement of the planets (in an idealized case) and has a potential to create the illusion of dark matter. Another physicist calculated that under Horava Gravity, our universe would experience not a Big Bang but a Big Bounce — and the new theory reproduces the ripples from such an event in a way that matches measurements of the cosmic microwave background."
Idle

Police Arrest Man For Refusing To Tweet 550

Posted by samzenpus
from the when-they-say-tweet-you-better-tweet dept.
RichZellich writes "Police arrested a senior vice president from Island Def Jam Records, saying he hindered their crowd-control efforts by not cooperating. The crowd at a mall where Justin Bieber was appearing got out of control, and police wanted the man to send a tweet asking for calm; he refused and they arrested him on a felony assault charge 'for putting people in danger.'"

Comment: Re:Lie about windows to get posted on slashdot (Score 1) 570

by AK Dave (#29829299) Attached to: Some Users Say Win7 Wants To Remove iTunes, Google Toolbar
I hate Windows as much as the next registered Linux user, and even I have to admit that this report is stupid. Gee, duh, it wants you to remove some software that has probably been demonstrated to interfere with the upgrade. Then you can add it back later. Is this any different than me rolling back to default video and a vanilla xorg prior to doing a big Ubuntu dist-upgrade next week? Not at all! It galls me to do this, but I have to give Microsoft credit (GAH! I DID IT!) for identifying software that might interfere with its upgrader and asking for that stuff to be removed for the upgrade. If I wanted to don my tin hat, I'd feel pretty silly complaining how MS is "targetting rival software" for removal so that WMP and Bing could take over after a Win7 upgrade. But I can't even joke about that with a straight face because it feels so silly.

One of the most overlooked advantages to computers is... If they do foul up, there's no law against whacking them around a little. -- Joe Martin

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