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Comment: Re:Police sponsoring piracy now? (Score 1) 159

by 91degrees (#47556925) Attached to: London Police Placing Anti-Piracy Warning Ads On Illegal Sites
I get the impression that this is a voluntary agreement with the advertisers. They don't want to sponsor anything that might arnish their valuable brands. It's not all that clear though. Seems there are 5 parties here including the police (the advertisers, the website, the banner ad wholesaler and "sunblock") but I don't know exactly who's in the group making this agreement and who gets paid.

Comment: Re:What?!? (Score 1) 894

If this is all there is to it, then the company screwed up big time. They could have ignored the tweet. They could have apologised and said they were going to look into it. Instead, somehow between receiving the tweet, and going through the various layers, someone decided that threatening to call the police was a good idea. While this may have been a decision made by the PR person, that seems unlikely.

Of course the other possibility is that there's something that wasn't mentioned that changes things a lot.

Comment: Re:Is there an SWA Twitter police? (Score 1) 894

Companies do follow their twitter feed, for mentions of their company and direct tags. I once got retweeted by Schipol airport because I mentioned how awesome it was that they had a library. A friend tweeted that she was being intimidated at a store car park and the store responded directly.

Comment: Re:Seems fairly popular (Score 1) 115

by 91degrees (#47514047) Attached to: UK Users Overwhelmingly Spurn Broadband Filters

The problem is the amount of power it gives censors

It doesn't. It's voluntary and privately run. The government has no control over it. Cleanfeed is a much bigger concern, but nobody actually seems to care about that.

Also social pressure gets applied so that anybody who does not wish to be told what they may or may not view by the government is considered "deviant"

This clearly isn't happening.

I still think there's a strong possibility that this was intended to satisfy the vocal minority who wanted some sort of ISP level filtering, under the pretence of being a means to satisfy the vocal minority that wanted some sort of ISP level filtering. Anything else increasingly seems like tin-foil hat stuff.

Comment: Seems fairly popular (Score 1) 115

by 91degrees (#47513611) Attached to: UK Users Overwhelmingly Spurn Broadband Filters
4% of Virgin's customers is a pretty hefty number of people. We must be talking 10's or hundreds of thousands.

So those who want filters have filters. Those who don't want filters don't have filters.

I seriously don't see a problem here. Far too many slashdotters are so scared of any form of filtering that they object even to entirely voluntary filters, that are demonstrably nowhere near as hard to switch off as they originally claimed.

Comment: Re:Illigal or not? (Score 1) 143

by 91degrees (#47507143) Attached to: For Now, UK Online Pirates Will Get 4 Warnings -- And That's It
Being sued in Britain is less of a worry than the US though. They would have to actually prove damages rather than just prove infringement. Unless they somehow manage to argue that a person is responsible for any and all copies and descendents of the original, this will be a fairly modest amount.

If someone ended up having to pay £200 or so for illegally distributing a £10 movie to 20 people I'm not going to have a lot of sympathy for them.

Comment: Re:lost the human touch? (Score 1) 102

by 91degrees (#47498667) Attached to: "Intelligent" Avatars Poised To Manage Airline Check-In
You're right. There's absolutely no need for humans at the baggage drop, except perhaps one person offering assistance if people have problems.

Flew from Gatwick to Tromsà with Norweigian in December. It was fantastic! Self check-in machine printed off a sticker for my luggage. Placed it in an automated bag drop, and the only queueing I had to do was at the security theatre.

KLM has something similar. BA at Heathrow still has manned desks but the kiosks print out the sticker so it is just a case of dropping the bags/

What this country needs is a good five cent microcomputer.

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