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+ - Once Slashdot beta has been foisted upon me, what site should I use instead? 2

Submitted by somenickname
somenickname (1270442) writes "As a long time Slashdot reader, I'm wondering what website to transition to once the beta goes live. The new beta interface seems very well suited to tablets/phones but, it ignores the fact that the user base is, as one would expect, nerds sitting in front of very large LCD monitors and wasting their employers time. It's entirely possible that the browser ID information gathered by the site has indicated that they get far more hits on mobile devices where the new interface is reasonable but, I feel that no one has analyzed the browser ID (and screen resolution) against comments modded +5. I think you will find that most +5 comments are coming from devices (real fucking computers) that the new interface does not support well. Without an interface that invites the kind of users that post +5 comments, Slashdot is just a ho-hum news aggregation site that allows comments. So, my question is, once the beta is the default, where should Slashdot users go to?"

+ - Slashdot beta sucks 9

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Maybe some of the slashdot team should start listening to its users, most of which hate the new user interface. Thanks for ruining something that wasn't broken."

Comment: Re:Yes, Great... (Score 1) 238

by 5c11 (#36688996) Attached to: Scientists Put an End To Smelly Socks
Among beer snobs, I think Lindeman's is usually sort of considered to be bottom rung (with the exception of their Cuvee Rene, which is fairly highly regarded). That said, Lindeman's isn't bad... I certainly would never turn down a glass.

My personal favorite is Cantillion Classic Gueze which is an unfruited blended lambic. It's very sour though... I often compare to drinking a glass of sharp cheese. Cantillion's fruited lambics are all really good as well.

If you like sours, Flanders Red Ales are also quite good... I would recommend Rodenbach, New Belgium's La Folie (seasonal release under their Lips of Faith label), or Duchesse De Bourgogne if you can find any of them.

Comment: Re:Realistically, though... (Score 1) 297

by 5c11 (#32449892) Attached to: The Race To Beer With 50% Alcohol By Volume

There's no need to remove fusel alcohols or methanol because they aren't there to begin with.

While it's true that there shouldn't be any methanol, yeast can and do sometimes form fusel alcohols during the process of fermentation. It's usually caused by underpitching the yeast or fermenting your beer too hot.

It's noticeable as a "hot" alcohol flavor in beers (and especially in young meads) and can give some people a wicked headache. On the plus side, fusels in beer will eventually break down into shorter chain alcohols, which is why high gravity beers and meads often need to be aged for awhile to mellow out.

(Took the BJCP course, but never took the test).

Comment: Re:So many games (Score 1) 325

by 5c11 (#31601864) Attached to: The Unsung Heroes of PC Gaming History

Maniac Mansion, an original graphical horror adventure game

I can let most of those inaccuracies slide but, um, what? Maniac Mansion is a comedy game. By Lucasfilm Games (who really only did comedies back in that era). I can think of only two reasons you would say it was a horror game:

(1) You're getting it confused with Hugo's House of Horrors or
(2) you're the guy who write movie descriptions for Netflix.

Comment: Re:Adult Gaming? Hah! (Score 1) 343

by 5c11 (#27926543) Attached to: On the Advent of Controversial Video Games
Ah... I didn't say it was a counter-argument at all, merely a possibly flawed example.

If much of the violence in the Brothers Grimm is "artificial", if you will - added in by some early-19th century Germans* who didn't want children reading about sex - and not actually part of the original folktales, it doesn't entirely mesh with the whole argument that violent media is a natural part of human culture. I'm not saying that that isn't the case, in fact it obviously is, I'm saying that the violence in Grimm could possibly be seen as more of a reflection of 19th century German mores than any universal truth and that his other examples (mythology, etc) were a bit better. I'm also saying that, as someone with a lit degree, it's not that often that I can come up with anything interesting to say on slashdot. :)

Oh, and the sisters chopping off their toes bit is brilliant, I have no idea why anyone would ever cut that out, authentic or not.

* The whole "children love violence" thing was seemingly big in 19th century Germany (for more fun, check out Der Struwwelpeter some time).

Comment: Re:Adult Gaming? Hah! (Score 1) 343

by 5c11 (#27915203) Attached to: On the Advent of Controversial Video Games

Go check out an original version of Grimm's Fairy Tales. I can guarantee you it won't be the Disneyfied stuff you're force feeding your kid. [...] Other cultures understood that violence was a part of being human.

Not necessarily the best of your examples... from what I remember out of my Folklore class, the Brothers Grimm actually added in a lot of that violence to replace all the sex they took out. Violence was deemed much more acceptable for children. Earlier versions of Kinder- und Hausmärchen are much racier.

Not as much depth as my Folklore prof. went into, but there's at least brief mention of it here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grimm's_Fairy_Tales

Comment: Re:Dymaxion House -- one *does* exist (Score 1) 203

by 5c11 (#23908457) Attached to: The Life and Times of Buckminster Fuller
If you continue reading the article, a little way down page 2 it says:

In 1945, Fuller attempted to mass-produce the Dymaxion House, entering into a joint effort with Beech Aircraft, which was based in Wichita. Two examples of the house were built before that project, too, collapsed. (The only surviving prototype, known as the Wichita House, looks like a cross between an onion dome and a flying saucer; it is now on display at the Henry Ford Museum, in Dearborn, Michigan.)

It is impossible to travel faster than light, and certainly not desirable, as one's hat keeps blowing off. -- Woody Allen

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