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Submission + - Microsoft offer Windows Store devs 80% revenue cut (

An anonymous reader writes: With the launch of the Windows Store alongside Windows 8 next year, Microsoft is changing the revenue split rules slightly. The default will still be a 30% cut (as announced in September) , but developers can increase their 70% cut to 80% if their app turns out to be very popular. Once an app has earned $25,000, Microsoft will automatically reduce their cut from each subsequent sale to 20%.

Microsoft is also undercutting Apple in terms of the how much a developer subscription costs. Companies will have to pay $99 every year, but individual developers get a cheaper $49 option.


Submission + - 40% of Gov Sites Vulnerable to SQL Injection (

Trailrunner7 writes: New research from security firm Veracode found 40% of government Web sites were found to contain SQL injection vulnerabilities on their first scan, compared with 29% of Web sites for financial-sector firms and 30% of software vertical sites. Overall, the prevalence of SQL injection holes declined from the same period six months ago, Veracode found, though that wasn't the case with government sites.

The story was even more grim with cross site scripting vulnerabilities. Seventy five percent of the government Web sites Veracode tested had cross site scripting holes on their first try. Finance sites faired only slightly better: 67% contained at least one cross site scripting hole and 55% of software industry Web sites.


Submission + - Linus joins MS as Chief Architect for new OS

Hugh Pickens writes: "IT Wire reports that Linus Torvalds, the creator of the Linux kernel, has signed up as Chief Software Architect with Microsoft to work on the Redmond Giant’s next-generation operating system. Torvalds will be working with Dave Cutler, the chief architect behind Windows NT who Microsoft similarly poached from Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) and who was behind the VAX/VMS operating system. “I’m excited about the chance to really innovate and make an operating system with Microsoft,” Torvalds says. "I want to see my work in the hands of the majority this time around.” Asked how he could reconcile working with Microsoft after long being a staunch open source advocate Torvalds said he did not see any conflict of interest. “Linux will continue to exist without me, and that’s the beauty of open source. Meanwhile, I hope to push Microsoft from the inside to make a free entry-level version of the new OS we’re creating." No details about the project are yet available, but given Cutler’s recent work on Windows Azure it’s possible it will be a cloud-centric operating system."

Submission + - SPAM: New app could make all software 'open source'

alphadogg writes: Imagine controlling Apple iTunes from inside Microsoft Word without having to switch applications. That could be possible, according to researchers at the University of Washington who are working on a project that could essentially make any proprietary software open source.

"Microsoft and Apple aren't going to open up all their stuff. But they all create programs that put pixels on the screen. And if we can modify those pixels, then we can change the programs' apparent behavior," said James Fogarty, a University of Washington assistant professor of computer science and engineering.

Almost everything seen on a display is made of prefabricated blocks of code, and the tool, called Prefab, [spam URL stripped] looks for those blocks as often as 20 times per second and alters their behavior.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Labour MP Backs Petition To Ban VAT On IT Repairs (

geek4 writes: A green petition designed to boost repair work has received political backing — but will it be enough?

A Labour MP has backed a campaign to lift value-added tax (VAT) from computer and communications repairs, in order to boost re-use and reduce the country’s environmental footprint.


Submission + - NVIDIA doubts ray tracing is the future of games (

SizeWise writes: After Intel's prominent work in ray tracing in the both the desktop and mobile spaces, many gamers might be thinking that the move to ray tracing engines is inevitable. NVIDIA's Chief Scientist, Dr. David Kirk, seems to think otherwise as revealed in an interview on the topic of rasterization and ray tracing. Kirk counters many of Intel's claims of ray tracing's superiority such as the inherent benefit to polygon complexity while pointing out areas where ray tracing engines would falter like basic antialiasing. The interview rounds out discussion on mixing the two rendering technologies and whether NVIDIA hardware can efficiently handle ray tracing calculations as well.

Submission + - Kaspersky 5.0 cannot be upgraded to Kaspersky 7.0?

An anonymous reader writes: Kaspersky have recently released a Kaspersky Antivirus 7.0 (we call it KAV 7). I am an end user who have bought Kaspersky Antvirus 5.0 (we call it KAV 5) in last year. The package includes a two year multi license. According to My KAV 5 license is still Active, so I should be able to upgrade to KAV 7. According to 99 Users who got KAV 5 will need to contact helpdesk for key replacement. So I did. But Kaspersky support told me that it is company policy that KAV5 cannot be upgraded to KAV7. According to 41999.html Users who need to get key replacement should contact the sales team. So I also did, but sales team told me that this is a technical issue and ask me to contact technical team instead. What a joke! I am not alone, I see users are complaining Kaspersky, in their own forum: 45302.html

Submission + - The end for SCO? (

thrykol writes: A federal judge has ruled that The SCO Group Inc. doesn't own the software it claims was misappropriated by developers of the open-source Linux operating system. In a 102-page ruling, U.S. District Court Dale Kimball ruled that Novell Inc., not SCO, owns copyrights covering the Unix operating system. SCO makes a business licensing Unix software for corporate servers.

Intel CPUs are not defective, they just act that way. -- Henry Spencer