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Comment Re:And by emergency they mean (Score 1) 48

You got it. There has been hardly any wage increases. Shortages always lead to higher prices. If there are no higher prices, the shortage is a lie.

Whats the rate of growth for salaries? A good rule of thumb is that there isn't' a shortage until nominal prices have doubled.

Comment Re:What's Good for Microsoft is Good for K-12 Scho (Score 1) 48

"We need talent [], we need it now, and we simply cannot find enough."

What they mean is:

We need talent [at a wage we are willing to pay], we need it now [but not so much that we are willing to train people, and spend the time and effort developing corporate training of people with aptitude], and we simply cannot find enough [who are willing to move to our area, fund their own skills development, accept a mediocre wage, put in longer than normal hours, have a lower than average quality of living, and do things which are pretty unimportant].

The reality is that there are plenty of people with talent, they are just working in areas of the country where the economics are better, where they don't have to live like paupers, and they don't have to deal with megalomaniacal personalities like the people running Facebook, Microsoft, and Google.

These are just not good places to work. They are not paying enough to entice otherwise talented people to upset their lives, move to an overpriced bubble driven real estate market, and try to put up with these quacks untested, new age, assine management techniques.

The word is out out about these tech giants.

Microsoft - guess what - you have a toxic culture where co-workers have incentive to back stab and dethrone managers, in order to "make the cut" each year? Why would I move out to a very pricey area and give up superior pay, superior work-life balance, and superior education opportunities for my kids, just so I can be stabbed in the back, shuffled around, re-org'ed, and eventually laid off because I don't have whatever latest skill you want and you aren't willing to invest in workforce development? All for 90k a year starting salary? Pass.

Facebook - why would I want to move to one of the most insanely expensive places in the country to work, ride a bus to work each day, be locked up inside your campus for "free lunches", be part of data mining, spamming, and exploiting users personal habits, relationships, and preferences for money. It's not revolutionary, it's not hip, it's not cool. All for about 95k a year starting salary? Pass.

Google - why would I want to work for the new evil empire, single handily expanding a dark shadow of data collection and kowtowing to authoritarian powers worldwide in order to sell shitty text ads to users, all the while locking out competition and blocking users from knowing whats really going on? Why answer to two silver-spoon billionaires who have delusions of importance for a starting salary of under 100k a year, while moving to yet another bubble driven real estate empire and being forced once again to ride a shitty bus to campus? So I can redirect funds from one or two profitable lines of business into trying to find the next hot thing which won't do anything important or lasting for mankind? Pass.

The problem is not a lack of a talent. It's a lack of talent who wants to work for these shitty companies, doing insignificant projects that will probably never see the light of day, while paying too much to live and having to answer to people who are convinced they are doing something special.

Comment I hope that ruling stands up (Score 2) 127

There are too many times rights holders throw out a complaint, even when it's a clear case of fair use. Then they put the burden of proof on the publisher to prove it's really fair use. It's abusive and unfair and about time RIAA and that ilk got their pee-pee whacked for papering the landscape with infringement threats.

Comment Re:Get used to it, this is the future (Score 3, Insightful) 279

You really think it was designed to increase inequality? Seriously? That is for to laugh. It was designed to make money without regard to equality, inequality, sustainability, or anything else. It was designed to make money. This digital divide you talk about isn't intentional at all. It's worse than that because if it was intentional then it could be stopped in a fairly straightforward manner. Instead it's like an annoying little gnat that keeps flying in the face of these companies and surfacing at awkward times like a random fart floating around in the middle of a cocktail party. They address it with a program or an offer, give away some stuff every once in a while, and hope everyone quits noticing it and resumes throwing money at them. It's just a side effect and the companies making all this cool stuff really would prefer that every single person in existence could afford their stuff. They just aren't interested in doing anything to make that happen. Not their problem.

Comment I have the evidence (Score 1) 696

I have a video camera on the front fork of my bike and have clear evidence of who's at fault. I have clips of city buses crowding the bike lane, the mirror whizzing by inches from my helmet. Other great shots of cars cutting me off on right turns, including one truck that ran me onto the sidewalk with his trailer, ironically next to a sign that said Right Turns Yield To Bikes In Bike Lane. Even left turns, people who can clearly see me coming, cutting it so close I've had to slide to a stop.

Mixed in with the idiots are a far larger pool of considerate people. People who insist on waiting for me, even when they have the right of way, cars that cover for me on turns and those who change lanes to give me more space. The considerate and aware people far outnumber the idiots but the problem is it only takes one idiot to kill you.

In my experience the worst offenders are women. Of the top 10 close calls I've had, 7 were female drivers. Ironically the closest call I've ever had was a police car, typing on his computer and not paying attention. He ran me into the curb and just kept going.

I've also seen my share of bike riders doing the incredibly stupid. Cutting across turn lanes when the arrow is with the cars, riding the wrong way down sidewalks, ignoring right of way at intersections and at night with no lights. So I understand the frustration the other way.

When it comes to bikes and pedestrians on roads, especially in big cities, the people designing bike lanes and intersections are people driving to work. In most cases the problem is literally dictating the solution. The other problem are the righteously entitled who scoff at bike riders because they're not paying road taxes. They're the most deliberate when it comes to ceding the very minimum amount of space when moving over. Those are the only ones I'd really like to drag of their car and beat to a pulp.

Comment I tried the same thing (Score 1) 146

By way of disclosure, I tried in 2009/2010 and wasn't able to do it at any reasonable cost. Our compromise was living in a campground and getting cable service. That worked surprisingly well.

While most campgrounds have wifi, not all campground wifi is reliable enough to run a business. During the season it will bog down during peak demand, some of the smaller campgrounds have time outs and bandwidth limiters.

Out in the twigs even wireless wasn't reliable enough to make work.

Comment I can tell from the comments (Score 5, Interesting) 382

I can tell from the comments most of you don't live near the ocean. Down here in South Florida it's already making an impact. There are storm drains that flow water during high tide up and down the coast and boat docks underwater. Miami is worse. Hallendale Beach has five of their seven fresh water pumps closed because of salt water intrusion.

The real problem that no one is talking about is what happens when Miami gets nailed by a Cat 4 or 5 hurricane? We're going to have boats washing up on I-95. Do we spend the money to rebuild Miami just to have it flood 40 years later? Or when it gets nailed by another hurricane?

Comment Re:Custom firmware (Score 2) 373

That's not that feasible: they use the consumer-area electronics a lot now to allow configuration of the more critical systems, and to read data from them.

It's not feasible to lock my front door, because my house was built with a non-stop conveyor belt running from the mailbox to the kitchen.

The entire point of this ask-slashdot is to identify cars that DON'T integrate entertainment systems and wireless access with the safety critical electronics. Cars that DON'T do the dumb&dangerous stuff you just listed.

Data flow *from* the primary systems *to* entertainment&wireless systems is marginally acceptable, if it's a physically enforced one-way data flow using optocouplers or something.

I seriously want each car manufacture to have one employee on staff, who's sole job is say "YOU'RE FIRED" every time any idiot engineer wants to permit ANY data flow from entertainment-or-wireless systems into safety-critical systems. I don't care how limited the APIs are, I don't caret how encrypted it is, I don't care how cryptographically-secure the certificates are. If there's data flow into critical safety systems, it's effectively certain that it's going to be vulnerable. You don't connect safety-critical systems to wireless input, period.


Comment Re:Why hasn't anybody forked Firefox already? (Score 2) 294

I haven't used it much yet, but Pale Moon may be what you're looking for. It's a fork of Firefox. The development design choices favor privacy, user-control, and improving speed&stability by dumping rarely-wanted code. Examples: They removed the Parental Controls code, they're excluding the new Firefox DRM support, they dumped support code for obsolete CPUs, they dumped some of the code for handicap-accessibility, and they currently removing phone-home code for crash reports and other potentially privacy-violating telemetry.

I haven't seen specific mention of it, but I'm certain there's no way in hell they will implement Mozilla's new policy of *prohibiting* you from loading any extension that hasn't been reviewed&approved&signed by Mozilla.


Comment Re:Tired... (Score 2) 294

In the next release or two, Firefox is going to start blocking you from loading any extension that hasn't been approved and signed by them. People have been SCREAMING on their message boards for a way to disable/override this, but they flat out refuse. The only way to get around it is to install a non-standard browser executable.


Comment Re: Way to sensationalize! (Score 1) 202

I love Apple stuff and have been a customer of theirs for years but starting with the iPad and continuing with the iWatch I just haven't been able to get behind buying it. I think they're both cool devices. They look like they might be fun to play around with and may even be sort of useful in a way but I look at the price tags and see what you get for that and I just can't make myself let go of that money. I'm an iMac, Macbook, and iPhone user and didn't mind spending the money on those but I think Apple just pretty much sold me everything they had that I want. The tablet and the watch just don't seem like good buys to me.

Comment MIT professor Ju Li (Score 1) 35

The new findings, which use aluminum as the key material for the lithium-ion battery's negative electrode, or anode, are reported in the journal Nature Communications, in a paper by MIT professor Ju Li and six others.

In related news, MIT professor Ju Na has some exiting discoveries in Sodium technology.


Comment They're going to lose this one (Score 2) 120

UC San Diego alleges that Aisen and at least eight colleagues (who have joined Aisen at USC) changed computer passwords to retain their custody and root control of the ADCS system, essentially locking out UCSD from administrative control of the Alzheimer’s study.

Courts have traditionally taken a dim view of that strategy. Hostage taking is almost never the answer, regardless of the nature of the dispute. Had he taken a copy of the database, that would have been more palatable. Something is always hinky when one person sets themselves up as the lone guardian of data purity.

"Open the pod bay doors, HAL." -- Dave Bowman, 2001