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Comment: Two takes on this (Score 1) 157

by 3dr (#48014899) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Software Issue Tracking Transparency - Good Or Bad?

First of all, I'm of the mindset that it's probably best to not list every issue fixed, and especially not list every bug reported publicly. Many bugs reports are bogus, and it's certainly possible for a large number of "reported issues" to detract from the true quality of the current version. For a new product I would never make this information public. But that's neither here nor there since in the OP's situation, they are public. So, let's go with that.

What I would do is based on a Freakonomics episode where a company (furniture company, or appliance company, whatever it doesn't matter) inadvertantly stopped advertising in some of their major-market newspapers. While it was an intern's mistake that this happened, what they found was that there was no impact (i.e. no reduction) of sales in those markets. So while a logical person would say, "Let's scrap advertising in those markets forever and keep the cash," the people in charge instead said "but we *have* to advertise." Preserving expectations/status-quo won out over rational thinking, and the difference was millions of dollars.

I would put a challenge to the marketing and sales departments. If they think public disclosure is hindering sales, let them prove it. Pull the publicly-visible bug tracking for a period of time and if the marketing and sales people are right, sales will go up compared to similar periods in previous years. If, however, customers are unhappy with the "secrecy", take that into account as a ding against the approach. But I'd be firm -- if you pull the bug info, the sales better increase.

Of course, before you issue a heavy-handed challenge to M&S, maybe just ask your existing customers about it. "We are considering pulling our publicly-visible bug tracking/reporting but have no plans to change our update cycle, just the reporting. How does this impact your business, and how does it impact your decision to use Product X?" Use that as a basis to continue current practice, or start the M&S challenge.

I also acknowledge I am anothing but a keyboard jockey in this horse race. :)

Comment: Re:They are wrong... (Score 1) 310

by 3dr (#48010463) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Swift Or Objective-C As New iOS Developer's 1st Language?

Although they plan to have translators to move old code forward, do you really trust automated translators enough to run them on huge chunks of production code?

Yes, certainly. It's called running the automated translator and NOT blindly checking in the generated code. There's no concern here.

Comment: Re:That guy is going to need a lawyer real fast (Score 1) 307

by 3dr (#47180133) Attached to: GM Names and Fires Engineers Involved In Faulty Ignition Switch

True. It's a shame, really, since his PRIDE is what apparently kept him from sucking it up and fixing it. His pride killed these people. And no design reviews of the switch for torque and electrical capacity? The managers have a role in this, too.

But in this whole scenario, I think the one thing that surprises me is how they are designing yet another ignition switch. How many switch variants do there need to be across a manufacturer's models? I'd divide it across RFID-enabled keys vs. plain-Jane metal keys.

Privacy

US Plunges To 46th In World Press Freedom Index 357

Posted by samzenpus
from the out-of-the-medals dept.
schwit1 writes "Reporters Without Borders puts out their Press Freedom Index every year, and the 2014 ranking came out today. It was not a good showing for the U.S. Specifically, the U.S. registered one of the steepest falls of all nations, down 13 slots to the #46 position, just above Haiti and just below Romania."

Comment: Re:Here is why... (Score 1) 261

by 3dr (#45704917) Attached to: Streaming and Cord-Cutting Take a Toll On the Pay-TV Industry
Yep, we don't watch live TV anymore since it's a better use of my time to wait for the recording, then FFwd over the copious commercials. That's like a 40% productivity increase! That and the fact that "cable" companies keep bumping up the total costs. TWC was careful to not change the specific service cost, but they would routinely increase the various bullshit fees appended to the bill. "1848 Reparations Bill Utility Access Fee, $5.00" "CEO New Car Assurance Fee, $1.29"

Comment: Re:recent? (Score 1) 165

by 3dr (#45623657) Attached to: Why Reactive Programming For Databases Is Awesome
Exactly. So far RP in the article sounds a lot like data-flow engines (spreadsheets, various visualization tools, DB triggers, even make builds). It has spanned decades and fields, too. Many artificial intelligence systems used this type of reactive engine; for example, the CLIPS engine "reacted" by matching conditions to a subset of currently-asserted facts to trigger actions (which can then cascade by asserting new facts and causing other patterns to match). The common aspect to all these applications of a data-flow engine is that a Result has Dependencies, and those Dependencies may be "atomic" (like a file timestamp in make), or a Result from an earlier conclusion. At any point in time, the entire scenario can be paused, and each pending Result has a list of Dependencies that may or may not be satisfied at that point. Spreadsheet calculation 101.

In any formula, constants (especially those obtained from handbooks) are to be treated as variables.

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