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Comment: Re:Garbage In (Score 1) 208

by hacker (#47417145) Attached to: Avast Buys 20 Used Phones, Recovers 40,000 Deleted Photos

Unfortunately, not supported by AT&T, Verizon or T-Mobile here in the US.

Sorry, 0.facebook.com is only supported by select mobile carriers and is not available from your mobile carrier.
If you are contacting your mobile carrier, mention that your IP address 99.16.210.3 is not supported.
Go to m.facebook.com (Standard data charges may apply) Report a Problem.

Comment: Re:Garbage In (Score 1) 208

by hacker (#47417131) Attached to: Avast Buys 20 Used Phones, Recovers 40,000 Deleted Photos

You may have uninstalled the app, but did you also freeze the in-ROM Facebook SNS service? Not likely, and it will bridge (eg: phone home) to other apps that integrate with and talk to Facebook.

Get Titanium Backup and freeze SNS, or use Root App Delete (for rooted Android phones) and get rid of that bugger. It eats data, leaks your location every 60s, and does all sorts of things you don't need or want it doing.

Comment: Re:TSA logic (Score 1) 656

by hacker (#47401355) Attached to: TSA Prohibits Taking Discharged Electronic Devices Onto Planes

And what if that outlet, with the "TSA-approved Cable(tm)" is doing more than just powering on your device?

This is why USB Condoms exist (no, this is not a joke)

http://int3.cc/collections/fro...

"Have you ever plugged your phone into a strange USB port because you really needed a charge and thought: "Gee who could be stealing my data?". We all have needs and sometimes you just need to charge your phone. "Any port in a storm." as the saying goes. Well now you can be a bit safer. "USB Condoms" prevent accidental data exchange when your device is plugged in to another device with a USB cable. USB Condoms achieve this by cutting off the data pins in the USB cable and allowing only the power pins to connect through.Thus, these "USB Condoms" prevent attacks like "juice jacking".

Comment: Migration AWAY from the iCloud (Score 1) 214

by hacker (#47352873) Attached to: Apple Kills Aperture, Says New Photos App Will Replace It

Despite Apple and other corporate plans to move everything and everyone to "The Cloud", the masses are doing quite the opposite, moving everything away from the cloud and hosted resources.

There's already a growing exodus to use personally-controlled storage, cloud and other environments, or heavily encrypted storage platforms to hold their data, making apps that expect "iCloud(tm)" and other in-the-clear, branded solutions from being all but useless.

So as long as these "replacement" versions work primarily, and with full functionality without feature-reduction 100% locally and by default, then they'll be fine. If they require the iCloud/cloud to function, they're going to suffer from diminished adoption.

The same is happening with digital currency v. analog/paper currency, resulting from increased eroding confidence in the system (eg: Target failures, identity theft, and hundreds of other examples in the news, nearly weekly).

If these features aren't being demanded by users (and there's plenty of evidence they're not), then why the big push to store everything you have and own, off-premises?

Comment: Re:Mostly Illegal (Score 1) 184

by hacker (#47297519) Attached to: EFF To Unveil Open Wireless Router For Open Wireless Movement

On my side, every single packet across the wireless side of the router, goes through a local Squid instance. Not only can I inspect the logs, but I have Squid filtering out tens of thousands of sites, domains, ad spamming pages and other things, so if there were any abuses coming, I could just block those too, or turn on other block index files and filter off even more.

Easey peasey.
 

Comment: Does it just kill the CELL portion? Or brick it? (Score 1) 137

by hacker (#47275927) Attached to: Google and Microsoft Plan Kill Switches On Smartphones

Here's the real Occum's Razor here:

Does the "kill switch" remotely disable the mobile/cellular capabilities of the phone? Or does it completely disable the device, thus bricking it?

These are smartphones, and they're used by many people for more than just a phone. I'd even argue that the function used the least on these devices, is the actual phone itself.

I rarely see someone having an actual voice conversation on a phone these, days, but people spend hours and hours doing everything else with them.

So if there's a civil uprising, martial law, and the .gov decides to shunt an entire city (Boston Bombers anyone? Greece? Turkey last year?, we've seen this many times already), then they also render these devices inert for much more than just communications devices.

- My ex-wife can no longer monitor her blood sugar (Type 1 diabetic, 100% digitally monitored via iPhone)
- Digital locks on your home no longer are able to be unlocked (keyless entry with NFS, etc.)
- Credit card information, details, photos, videos, other data is now unavailable

The chilling effect of this alone, should cause hundreds of thousands of people to step up and march on their congressperson's front door.

The potential abuses of this are so far reaching, far superseding the cost of replacing a phone handset that happens to get stolen.

I'd rather see the funding go into a user-driven device locating capability, with remote wipe/reporting on the other end instead of a remote kill switch controlled by corporations and the .gov.

Very scary stuff happening here. Verrrrry scary.

"The greatest warriors are the ones who fight for peace." -- Holly Near

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