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Comment: Re:Same as booting a shoplifter out of a store... (Score 1) 106

by 0xygen (#38187762) Attached to: UK ISP Disconnecting Filesharers

That analogy seems rather stretched... It seems more like Mr A ISP going into the store with a big bag, grabbing a pile of stuff, walking out without paying, ducking into an alley, giving it to an anonymous individual, then when the store refuses to allow Mr A ISP on their property, he says "But I did not steal the goods, I'm just a carrier, you cannot punish me, I was an innocent party getting paid to do it!".

Comment: Re:Programming (Score 1) 799

by 0xygen (#30575958) Attached to: How To Teach a 12-Year-Old To Program?

The abstraction does not help the individual to learn how the machine works though.
To breed a new generation of actual technically interested kids who understand the lower levels of the machine and how the high level OOP abstractions actually execute on the hardware, I honestly believe you have to start at the other end.

I feel all of my knowledge of creating efficient solutions to problems stems from having learned BASIC, got dragged into assembler through that, back up into C, onto C++ and OOP, then into Java and dynamic languages like Lua.

Doing it the other way around seems to feel somewhat backwards to me, although I would certainly take the point that today's optimizing compilers are incredible, and the ability of high-level languages to create very efficient code in a relatively small amount of code are incredible. Maybe my desire to understand what goes on underneath leads me to program in particular ways that are not always suitable to high level and functional languages?

Comment: Re:Wait... (Score 1) 80

by 0xygen (#30434196) Attached to: PayPal Offers $150,000 In Developer Challenge

Of course it makes a difference. You are potentially allowing the site to take as much as they like from your account, whereas by instead logging into the PayPal page, the merchant never has to even know what method you use to authenticate with PayPal and will only provide the amount of funds shown on the payment confirmation page to the merchant.

With the second method, there is no requirement to trust the merchant with anything more than the value of the single transaction, your name and your delivery address

The Internet

+ - SPAM: Internet's First Registered Domain Name Sold

Submitted by
MojoKid
MojoKid writes "Believe it or not, it wasn't iternet.com or dot.com that was purchased when the Internet was "born." Instead, it was the somewhat off-the-wall name of symbolics.com. The Symbolics company was the first to use an internet domain name to guide Internet viewers to its line of Lisp machines, which were single-user computers optimized to run the Lisp programming language. XF.com Investments, which is a Missouri-based Internet investments firm, has managed to secure the domain name from its original owner for an undisclosed sum and XF's CEO was quick to proclaim his excitement over the acquisition. It's hard to say why this domain name was the first purchased back on March 15, 1985, but for obvious reasons it holds a special place in history. There has been one original owner for nearly 25 years. Over that time, we've seen the Internet grow to the tune of 180,000,000+ registered domains, and thousands more are being added each and every day."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:pwned (Score 1) 595

by 0xygen (#29063871) Attached to: Local Privilege Escalation On All Linux Kernels

Did I miss the joke?

Windows Servers are likely to be operated by server operators, who on average have (a little) more of a clue than Joe Bloggs.
Joe boots up Vista, turns off UAC, logs on as an administrator and installs Bonzi Buddy and anything IE asks him to.

It really does not say anything about the operating systems though... considering Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 are pretty much the same thing under the hood, the only real difference is default permissions and running services.

Part of the very nature of Linux and BSD often being more secure is that the operators understand the system and the best practises on how to configure the system.

Comment: Re:The main reason games don't have obscene conten (Score 1) 229

by 0xygen (#28644363) Attached to: Video Games, the First Amendment, and Obscenity

I'm not sure I see where you jump from the permission to do whatever is necessary to circumvent the protection on a DMCA work to reproducing the a DMCA protection mechanism on a new work. These (sadly) still seem to be very different things in my mind. I'm a European though, so maybe I just don't get it.

I'm not even sure that the EUCD has circumvention provisions yet! :-( I hope someone can enlighten me...

Comment: Re:The main reason games don't have obscene conten (Score 1) 229

by 0xygen (#28644297) Attached to: Video Games, the First Amendment, and Obscenity

I seem to recall that a large part of the Accolade problem was that including the necessary magic copyright signature in the ROM caused a "Licensed by Sega" screen to appear, which was known to be untrue in this circumstance, so Accolade decided to follow it with a "This product is NOT licensed or endorsed by Sega" screen to undo the effects of the misleading information.

Comment: Re:The player is the biggest problem with destruct (Score 1) 170

by 0xygen (#28502441) Attached to: The State of Video Game Physics

I think you're a lot closer to how the future will go with regards to sandbox gaming.

There should be a lot of cosmetic and insignificant damage, for example the trees in Crysis, but there needs to be a level between destroying the lean-to huts with a single grenade and not being able to even dent the bigger caravan-type military huts.

Hopefully as system ram sizes begin to skyrocket, these issues will disappear. I remember a time where racing games left only a 10 foot tyre track from your car, and now they're permanent for all cars.

You knew the job was dangerous when you took it, Fred. -- Superchicken

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